Hawaii Department of Health Reminds Food Establishments of Law Prohibiting Use of Latex Gloves

Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) food safety inspectors will begin stepping up enforcement of a State law that bans the use of latex gloves by Hawaii’s food service industry.

Act 180, which took effect Jan. 1, 2017, prohibits the use of latex gloves by personnel working in food establishments. DOH has asked the Hawaii Restaurant Association, Hawaii Food Manufacturers Association, the Hawaii Food Industry Association and the Hawaii Lodging and Tourism Associations to remind their members about the latex glove prohibition.

“Enforcing the prohibition will be a routine part of our food safety inspections,” said Peter Oshiro, head of the state’s food safety program. “Our inspectors and field staff will be checking food establishments to ensure that workers are not using latex gloves, and educating management and staff about the new law.”

Non-compliance with the law may result in fines of up to $10,000 for each offense. Violations of the ban will not affect a food establishment’s placard status.

The original measure, SB911 SD2 HD2 CD1, was co-introduced in 2015 by State Sen. Rosalyn Baker and former senator Suzanne Chun-Oakland and signed into law by Gov. David Ige in July 2016. The purpose of the bill is to prevent the occurrence of severe and potentially life threatening allergic reactions such as impaired breathing and anaphylaxis by those who are sensitive to latex. An estimated three million people in the U.S. are allergic to latex, according to the American Latex Allergy Association.

DOH requires all food-handlers who come into contact with ready-to-eat food products to use gloves to prevent the occurrence of food illnesses. Non-latex and nitrile gloves are readily available and currently used by employees in both the food service and health care industries.

DOH’s Sanitation Branch protects and promotes the health of Hawaii’s residents and visitors through education of food industry workers and regulation of food establishments statewide. The branch conducts routine health inspections of food establishments where food products are prepared, manufactured, distributed or sold.

The branch also investigates the sources of foodborne illnesses and potential adulteration and is charged with mitigating foodborne outbreaks and/or the prevention of future occurrences. Health inspectors work with business owners, food service workers and the food industry to ensure food preparation practices and sanitary conditions.

For more information on the department’s food safety program, go to: http://health.hawaii.gov/san/.

Coast Guard Assists Disabled, Adrift Vessel Off Maui

The Coast Guard successfully assisted the crew of the 25-foot pleasure craft Nohuli, safely towing the vessel back to shore after it became disabled and adrift approximately 17 miles north of Kahului, Maui, Sunday.

A 29-foot Response Boat-Small boatcew from Coast Guard Station Maui launched to assist the vessel due to a health condition of one of the passengers, impending sunset and lack of available commercial assistance.

Once onscene, the RB-S crew safely brought the three passengers aboard and placed the Nohuli into a stern tow. The passengers and Nohuli were transported back to Kahului Harbor. No injuries were reported.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a call from Maui 911 dispatch just before noon Sunday and were conferenced in with the operator of the Nohuli. The operator reported that all three people were wearing lifejackets, had plenty of food and water, were in no immediate danger and had an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon however, one member was diabetic. Attempts to coordinate commercial or good Samaritan assistance were unsuccessful prompting the Coast Guard response.

“We can’t stress enough the importance of having proper equipment and being prepared when out to sea”, said Lt. Victoria Lacefield-Rodriguez, a command duty officer at Sector Honolulu. “The Nohuli crew’s actions are a perfect example of being prepared. This tow was executed perfectly and without further incident by Station Maui, but in the event conditions worsened or something went wrong, having that EPIRB, extra provisions and any necessary medications put this crew in a position to be self sufficient until help arrived.”

Hawaii Police Department Backpack Drive For Children Who Can’t Afford Them

The Hawaiʻi Police Department is proud to participate again in a backpack drive for children who cannot afford to buy them. As in previous years, all police stations around the island will double as drop-off points for persons interested in helping children in need. Backpacks may be dropped off between now and (August 30).

Backpacks have been identified as the most requested non-food item for charities in Hawaiʻi. The donated backpacks will be distributed to children at women’s shelters, homeless shelters and transitional housing facilities around the Big Island.

This is the ninth consecutive year the Police Department has worked in partnership with HOPE Services Hawaiʻi (formerly known as the Office of Social Ministry), and Camp Agape Big Island.

Regulators Accept Hawaiian Electric Companies’ Plan to Reach 100% Renewable Energy

The Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has accepted the Hawaiian Electric Companies’ plan charting the near-term actions that will lead to 100 percent of Hawaii’s power generation needs coming from renewable resources to meet 100 percent of Hawaii’s power generation needs by 2045.

The Power Supply Improvement Plan Update accepted by the PUC on July 14 describes the work by Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric and Hawaii Electric Light that will form the foundation to meet or exceed the state’s renewable energy milestones, the most ambitious in the country.

In its decision, the commission commended the companies’ analysis of options to meet Hawaii’s future needs for electricity, the openness of the planning process and the “high-quality stakeholder input” that together resulted in “a set of plans that provides useful context for making informed decisions regarding the near-term path forward.”

“After review, commission has reasonable assurance that many of the actions identified … are credible, supported by sound judgment and analysis, informed by stakeholder input and consistent with state energy policy and prior commission orders,” the commission stated.

The plan describes several key goals, including acquisition of nearly 400 megawatts of new renewable energy resources by 2021. The commission urged the companies to move quickly on a “transparent, timely and successful procurement process” to work with project developers and capture federal investment tax credits before they expire.

“We appreciate the commission’s acceptance of our plan and its guidance for moving forward,” said Alan Oshima, Hawaiian Electric president and CEO. “As the commission noted, thoughtful input from the participants was a key to developing a successful plan and we will continue to work with everyone in our community as we implement it.”

The companies followed an open, collaborative process to develop the plan, participating in multiple stakeholder workshops and technical conferences to share information and ideas. Planners used industry-leading tools and techniques to analyze multiple scenarios to balance the desires for reliability, affordability and sustainability.

Among the participants in planning were the state Consumer Advocate; County of Hawaii; County of Maui; Ulupono Initiative; Blue Planet Foundation; Hawaii Gas; Paniolo Power on Hawaii Island and the state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism.

Additional independent technical analysis was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Hawaii Natural Energy Institute and Electric Power Research Institute.

The plan emphasizes work that is in progress or planned over the next five years on each of the five islands served by Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric and Hawaii Electric Light.

The companies exceeded the state’s 2015 renewable energy target and forecast they will exceed the state’s renewable energy milestones in 2020, 2030 and 2040 by attaining a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) of:

  • 48 percent by the end of 2020; the mandated goal is 30 percent
  • At least 72 percent by the end of 2030; the mandated goal is 40 percent
  • At least 100 percent by the end of 2040; the mandated goal is 70 percent. This would be five years ahead of the 2045 deadline to reach the goal of 100 percent renewable energy.

By 2020, Hawaii Island is forecast to reach an RPS of 80 percent; Maui 63 percent; Lanai 59 percent and Oahu, 40 percent. On Molokai, Maui Electric is working with the community on options for reaching 100 percent RPS by 2020.

To maintain reliability of electric service, the plan calls for adding energy storage and other grid technologies to accompany new renewable resources.

The plan includes continued growth of private rooftop solar and describes the work to expand and upgrade grid infrastructure and to use the newest generations of inverters, control systems and energy storage to help reliably integrate an estimated total of 165,000 private systems by 2030, more than twice today’s total of 79,000.

The Hawaiian Electric Companies already have the highest percentage of customers using rooftop solar of any utility in the U.S. The national average is one percent while the percentage in the Hawaiian Electric Companies service territories is 17 percent.

Feral Goat, Sheep, and Pig Hunt and Ungulate Control Program Announced for the Pu’u Wa’awa’a Forest Reserve

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) announces the opening of the hunting season in the Pu’u Wa’awa’a Forest Reserve (PWW) Youth and Disabled Hunt and Makai Sections pursuant to Title 13, Chapter 123, “Rules Regulating Game Mammal Hunting.”

DLNR-DOFAW also announces a special Ungulate Control Program for the PWW Mauka section pursuant to Title 13, Chapter 123, “Rules Regulating Game Mammal Hunting,” §13-123-9.

The SPECIAL YOUTH AND DISABLED HUNT will be open in the Safety Zone above the Pu’u Lani subdivision on weekends and State Holidays for the month of August 2017. Only youth (children who are 15 years of age or younger) and disabled hunters may hunt in this area.

Only one adult licensed hunter may accompany each youth hunter and one licensed, non-hunting assistant may accompany each disabled hunter. The bag limit for this hunt is three (3) nontypical rams and one (1) typical ram per hunter per day. This is also the season limit (See Table 1). Deboning and skinning is allowed. Skull with attached horns must remain intact and genitals must remain attached to the carcass.

The MAKAI ARCHERY (below Mamalahoa Highway) season will take place during the first four consecutive weekends in August, and during any State holidays that occur during that time (i.e. August 18, 2017; Statehood Day). The bag limit for this hunt is one (1) pig, one (1) nontypical ram, and three (3) goats per hunter per day. This is also the season limit. Deboning and skinning is allowed. The tail and genitalia of harvested animals must remain attached for species and sex identification purposes.

The MAKAI MUZZLELOADER season will take place during the three weekends following the archery season, and during any State holidays that occur during that time (i.e. September 4, 2017; Labor Day). The bag limit for this hunt is one (1) pig, one (1) non-typical ram, and three (3) goats per hunter per day. This is also the season limit. Deboning and skinning is allowed. The tail and genitalia of harvested animals must remain attached for species and sex identification purposes.

The PWW MAUKA UNGULATE CONTROL PROGRAM (above Mamalahoa Highway), will be a non-typical ram and feral goat hunt, and will take place concurrently with the Makai Muzzleloader season (during the three consecutive weekends following the Makai Archery season, including State holidays). The bag limit will be one (1) non-typical ram and two (2) goats (either sex) per hunter per day. During this program, the whole carcasses (entrails can be cleaned, but with attached genitalia on carcass) need to be inspected at checkout. For safety purposes, a maximum of 30 permittees will be allowed per day. Hunters interested in participating on the PWW MAUKA UNGULATE CONTROL PROGRAM will be issued permits at the hunter check station on a first-come, first-served basis.

Hunters will need to purchase 2018 goat and ram tags to legally hunt these species in these areas. Tags may be purchased from any Hawaii Island Division of Forestry and Wildlife office and at the PWW Hunter Check Station during the hunt. Exact change of $10/tag (resident hunters) and $25/tag (non-resident hunters) is required when purchasing tags at the hunter check station.

The harvest tags will be non-transferable and non-refundable and must be placed through the hind leg of the animal immediately after each kill, and remain tagged until the hunter checks out of the hunting area and arrives home or to their final destination.

Hunters are to check in at the Pu’u Wa’awa’a check station beginning at 5 a.m. the day of the hunt and must be checked-out 7:45p.m. There is NO CAMPING allowed in the hunting area on any night before or during the hunt.

Further information may be obtained by contacting the DOFAW Office in Kamuela at (808) 887- 6063.

Free Orchid Show This Sunday

The 35th annual Kona Daifukuji Orchid Club (KDOC) show and sale is 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, July 23 at the Daifukuji Soto Mission Hall. The free event offers attendees a complimentary orchid boutonniere corsage—while they last.  This year’s theme, “Orchids in Your Hawaiian Garden,” offers educational displays on how to add beauty and fragrance to your outdoor space, plus a guided tour through the on-site Orchid Grotto. The grotto demonstrates how to beautify a problematic space that can be enjoyed from both inside and out. The anniversary show also offers a historical-themed exhibit, “Orchid Reflections, Past and Present.”

Enjoy an elaborate and colorful display of live blooming cattleya, cymbidium, dendrobium, phalaenopsis, miltonia, vanda and more. Cameras are welcome.

Got growing questions? Veteran members staff a Question and Answer Booth where attendees can get expert advice on caring for orchids. The club boasts long-time members who have been growing orchids at different Kona elevations and in Ocean View.

The event offers an outdoor sale of high-quality orchid species and hybrids grown by club members and select Big Isle commercial growers. Club members will sell home-baked goods and drinks and membership info will be available.

The Kona Daifukuji Orchid Club is West Hawai‘i’s oldest orchidaceae organization with a mission to learn and foster orchid culture and promote fellowship among orchid collectors. The club meets the second Wednesday of every month at the Daifukuji Soto Mission Hall on Hwy. 11 at mile marker 114, just north of Kainaliu. Get club updates at www.facebook.com/orchidsinparadise.

Azure, Winner of Division 7, Transpac Hero Assisting Distressed Team at Sea Costing Them 7 Hours in Race

At 11:39pm last night the winner of Division 7, Azure crossed Diamond Head Finish line, finally.  Azure will be remembered in this Transpac as Incredible Heroe’s. They went out of their way to help a fellow team, Medusa, costing them 7 hours out of the race, to assist, the first calling of sailors at sea, regardless of a race or not.

Team Azure

During the past 12 hours we welcomed the only Russian boat to ever enter and race in Transpac, Weddel, skippered by  Avanasy Isaev, in his Grand Mistral Italian Made One Design boat; a Lord from England who sailed ALL THE WAY through the Panama Canal from Great Britan to Long Beach, to race in Transpac, and many “kids” with their dads, boys and girls alike, as young as 12 years old.

With all Hawaii affiliated boats having crossed the finish line at Diamond Head safely we now give our final 4 boats the traditional ALOHA WELCOME, during the next 24-30 hours in the Ala Wai Small Boat Harbor at Hawaii Yacht club, including  our “Tail End Charlie”, the final boat to cross the finish line, projected to arrive late Monday night, early Tuesday morning, Kastor Pollux.  Yes, Transpac is a very prestigious race, started in the late 1800’s by King Kalakaua, but nothing says race orgainzers don’t have tons of fun and throw the best parties for sailors the world knows, in fact our Welcome Parties greeting sailors from across the globe are legendary. And this has been done the same way for over 100 years.

Read more about it here:

We are about 800 miles away from Honolulu and all is well on board. We are still in first place for our division so far. Today the sun finally came out and Tony saw his favorite albatross to start the day. Our next challenge will be to determine our gibe mark to head for Hawaii. You do not want to wait too early or too late, so we are doing a bunch of calculations to determine the correct time.

We received a distress call from the Santa Cruise 52 Medusa at about 11:30am this morning. They reported their fuel was contaminated with water, they were out of power, and were requesting assistance. We measured the fuel we had and offered 5 gallons, and we converged for the transfer at about 4:30 pm – I am sure the yellow brick must show us stopped for some time. Transferring fuel in the middle of the pacific in 18 knots of wind with big swells is not easy. Then we had to figure out how to get the fuel out of our tank. Luckily Medusa had and electric transfer pump and some empty containers. They put everything in a big drybag with a fender attached and sailed by to toss in on Azure. We successfully transferred at least 5 gallons of diesel, in milk containers, OJ containers, and spent motor oil containers. We were able to set everything afloat and they were able to swing by and pick it up. Medusa radioed us later to say every thing was ok, the engine was running and batteries were charging.

The clouds out here in the middle of the ocean are really nice. You can see under them forever, so they make for great sunsets and create some unusual shapes. Jim cracked me up this morning looking at one strange cloud – “Angry Birds” he yelled.

Queen Lili‘uokalani Keiki Hula Competition Celebrates 42 Years: Children’s Event Honors Culture, Music, Dance

The Kalihi-Pālama Culture & Arts Society proudly presents the 42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Keiki Hula Competition this Thursday through Saturday, July 20-22, at the Neal S. Blaisdell Center Arena.  This competition was established in 1976 to provide a venue for children ages 5-12 to showcase their achievements in ancient and modern hula.   Four hundred youngsters will represent twenty-two hālau from O’ahu, Maui, Kaua’i, Hawai‘i Island, and Japan.

40th Annual Queen Lili’uokalani 2015 Keiki Hula Competition. Photo: James Kimo Garrett

Over its history, thousands of keiki have participated in this prestigious event. Former Miss Keiki Hula winners include Kumu Hula and 1995 Miss Aloha Hula Kailihiwa Vaughan, 2015 Miss Aloha Hula Jasmin Dunlap, and Kumu Hula and 1999 Miss Aloha Hula Keola Dalire, who brings her hālau to this year’s competition backed by Grammy winner Kalani Pe‘a. Former Master Keiki Hula winners include Kumu Hula Brandon Paredes and Kau‘i Kamana‘o, both of whom bring their hālau regularly to the competition. Former Master Keiki Hula winners also include fashion designers Manaola Yap (Manaola Hawai‘i) and Chaz Kamau‘u (Hula Tease).

“Keiki Hula exemplifies the best of Hawai‘i. It’s a combination of culture, community, and children,” explains Kalihi-Pālama Culture & Arts Society President, Trisha Kehaulani Watson. “Nothing is more inspiring than watching children dance hula. This event gives keiki the opportunity to showcase their hard work and passion. We have seen over our many years how this opportunity positively shapes children’s lives and helps to set in families a lifelong appreciation of hula and the arts. It’s a beautiful experience.”

This event is supported by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the Hawai’i Tourism Authority, the State Foundation on Culture & the Arts, and numerous community partners.  For more information, email info@kpcahawaii.com or visit our website at www.keikihula.org.

The schedule of the competition is as follows:

  • Thursday, July 20, 6:00 p.m. – Miss & Master Keiki Hula competition
  • Friday, July 21, 6:00 p.m. – Group-Hula Kahiko competition
  • Saturday, July 22, 1:00 p.m. – Group-Hula ‘Auana competition

Reserved seats are $14.50 for adults and $12.50 for children 4-12 yrs.  Tickets are on sale now at the Blaisdell Center box office, by calling Ticketmaster at 1(800)745-3000 or via the internet at www.ticketmaster.com.

The participating hālau are:

  • Aloha ‘O Pu’uwailani Halau
  • Halau Kekuaokala’au’ala’iliahi
  • Halau Hula Helele’i Pua ‘O Waipi’o
  • Halau Keolakapuaokalani
  • Halau Hula ‘O Hokulani
  • Halau ‘O Kaululaua’e
  • Halau Hula O Keola-Ali’iokekai
  • Halau ‘O Napuala’ikauika’iu
  • Halau Hula ‘O Napunaheleonapua
  • Hula Halau ‘O Kamuela
  • Halau Hula O Puka’ikapuaokalani
  • Hula Hui O Kapunahala O Nu’uanu YMCA
  • Hula Halau ‘O Leilani
  • Halau Na Lei Kaumaka O Uka
  • Halau Hula Olana
  • Ka La ‘Onohi Mai O Ha’eha’e
  • Halau o Ka Hanu Lehua
  • Ka Pa Nani ‘O Lilinoe
  • Halau Ka Lei Mokihana O Leina’ala
  • Keolalaulani Halau Olapa O Laka
  • Halau Kala’akeakauikawekiu
  • Leialoha Hula Studio

This year’s event will include some of Hawaii’s top Hawaiian musicians, including Keauhou, Waipuna, Kuana Torres, Na Palapalai, Natalie Ai Kamauu, Hoku Zuttermeister, Chad Takatsugi and many more.

 

Costco Violates Hawaii HI-5 Rule – Ordered to Pay Fine

Costco Wholesale Corporation has paid a fine of $4,799.40 for violating State deposit beverage container (DBC) requirements.On April 24, 2017, the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) sent a Request for Information letter to Costco requesting that the company submit sales information for auditing purposes. Despite more than 15 emails and telephone calls, Costco remained non-cooperative in providing the requested information in violation of the DBC Program audit authority specified in Hawaii Revised Statutes §342G-121.

DOH issued a Notice of Violation and Order (NOVO) against the company on June 13, 2017. Costco paid an administrative fine of $4,799.40 on July 12, 2017. Costco also provided the requested sales information and submitted a letter summarizing its procedure for generating sales data, satisfying the compliance requirements set forth in the NOVO.

Darren Park, manager of the department’s Deposit Beverage Container Program, said it is important for wholesalers and distributors to comply with requests from the DOH which administers the “HI-5” recycling program.

“The program relies on self-reported data, so the department conducts audits and inspection activities to ensure accuracy and completeness of information submitted, which helps to prevent fraud and financial harm to the State,” Park said. “Overall, the recycling program reduces litter at our parks and beaches and has kept billions of bottles and cans out of our garbage.”

More than 600 million deposit beverage containers are recycled annually at certified redemption centers that otherwise would be landfilled or end up littering Hawaii’s environment. Since 2005, Hawaii’s residents have recycled nearly 8 billion deposit beverage containers through the DBC Program.

Augie T “Laugh Da Island Way” Statewide Comedy Tour

Favorite local comedian Augie T is proud to announce the “Laugh Da Island Way” statewide comedy tour this September, presented by Island Air and Primo.

In Kona, “Laugh Da Island Way” comes to ʻUmeke’s Pāʻina Room on September 1. Augie T will be joined by opening act Kanoa Kukaua from Maui. Show begins at 8 p.m., tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door from ʻUmeke’s or AugieT.com.

In Hilo, join Augie T at the Afook Chinen Civic Auditorium on September 2 with opening act Kanoa Kukaua. Tickets are $10 general admission, or $20 VIP seating including an Augie T gift. Show begins at 8 p.m., tickets are available at KTA Super Stores locations in Hilo, as well as AugieT.com.

On September 8, “Laugh Da Island Way” comes to Hawaiʻi Theatre on Oʻahu where Augie T will be filming for his ninth DVD and TV special. The opening act will be Shawn Garnett of Hawaiʻi Five-O fame. Show begins at 8 p.m., tickets are available at the Hawaiʻi Theatre box office for $30. For this show only, special $5 tickets are available for Oʻahu residents who bring proof of low income to the box office. Acceptable proof includes a Section 8 housing voucher or acceptance letter, a public housing rental agreement or tenant ID, SNAP letter of acceptance, or a Quest/Medicaid card.

The Maui show will be on September 15 at the historic ʻĪao Theatre in Wailuku. Opening for Augie T will be Shawn Garnett. Show begins at 8 p.m., tickets are $20 at AugieT.com.

The tour closes on Kauaʻi on September 16, at the Kauaʻi Veterans Center. Opening for Augie T will be Shawn Garnett. Tickets are $20 in advance at AugieT.com, $25 at the door.

All shows in the “Laugh Da Island Way” tour are benefits for B.R.A.V.E Hawai‘i in an effort to bring an anti-bullying message to school-aged youth. Over 3,000 students on O‘ahu and Hawai‘i Island have experienced B.R.A.V.E. presentations, and the organization will be coming to middle schools on Hawai‘i Island this year with your support. Find out more about B.R.A.V.E. Hawai‘i at BRAVEhawaii.org.