Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s July 2017 Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s  Stewardship at the Summit (SAS) volunteer program.

ADIP, SAS and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Stewardship at the summit volunteer Heather removes invasive Himalayan ginger near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo/David Boyle

Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required for groups under six people, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for details. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: July 1, 7, 15, 21 and 29 at 9 a.m.
  • Where: Meet project leaders at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

37th Annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival & BioBlitz at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park! Everyone is invited to engage in authentic Hawaiian cultural practices and learn how Hawaiians live closely to the land as its stewards. Enjoy hula and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. This year’s festival will again include a “BioBlitz,” a chance to join scientists and cultural practitioners and discover the biodiversity that thrives in the park.

  • When: Sat., July 8; Cultural Festival is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; BioBlitz activites from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Military Camp, about 1 ½ miles from the park entrance

What We Can Do Now to Data Recorded Way Back When. Now in its second century of operation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) has fully embraced digital data recording and analysis. As technologies evolve, the challenge is to apply contemporary digital analysis techniques to historic paper seismic records. Join USGS HVO Geophysicist Paul Okubo as he describes a current look into seismograms from HVO’s first 100 years. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: Tues., July 11 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei Making Demo. Join local cultural practitioner Pua O’Mahoney and learn to make traditional Hawaiian lei with natural materials that include leaves, flowers, and more. The beautiful and versatile Hawaiian lei is used for adornments, blessings, rituals, gifts and as an expression of love and celebration. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: Wed., July 12 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Nā Wai Chamber Choir Performs. Revel in music that honors the traditions, sacred places, mythology, and legacies of Hawaiʻi Island. Based in Honolulu, Nā Wai Chamber Choir is a professional women’s vocal ensemble that celebrates the works of women, preserves and propagates Native Hawaiian music both past and present, and champions innovative repertoire for treble voices. Dr. Jace Kaholokula Saplan leads the choir on their Moku o Keawe tour.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: Tues., July 18 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hālau Nā Pua o Uluhaimālama Performance. Hālau Nā Pua o Uluhaimālama, from Hawai‘i Island, is a hula dance troupe that perpetuates the culture and arts of hula.

They are led by Kumu Hula Emery Aceret, a student of the revered Kumu Hula Ray Fonseca, and they have participated in many notable hula competitions. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: Wed., July 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Vespers at Hānaiakamālama. Vespers at Hānaiakamālama is an amazing one-woman show on the life of Queen Emma. University of Hawai‘i-Hilo Performing Arts Graduate Denyse Woo-Ockerman brings the audience into Queen Emma’s home as she contemplates her eventual life, rich in family history and the weight of unexpected tragedy. Married to King Kamehameha IV, Alexander Liholiho, Emma reveals her resilience as they attempt to build, side-by-side, a better life for all Hawaiians, during a time of great change in the islands. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.

  • When: Tues., July 25 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

‘Ohe Kāpala Demonstration. Learn to create designs from traditional patterns using bamboo stamps (‘ohe kāpala). Originally used to decorate clothing with symbolic meaning, we now use ‘ohe kāpala to tell stories on a wide variety of modern materials. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., July 26 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

8 More Mumps Cases Reported on Oahu – Number of Cases Now at 104

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed eight (8) additional cases this week of Oahu residents with the mumps, pushing the total number of cases this year to 104.

Three new cases were confirmed on Tuesday, June 13, and involved two (2) adults and one (1) child. None of the cases required hospitalization and all three are recovering. An additional five (5) cases were confirmed today, involving one (1) adult and four (4) children, none of whom required hospitalization.

DOH expects the current mumps outbreak to continue and the investigation of new cases is ongoing. Mumps is highly contagious and is spread through coughing, sneezing and sharing cups and utensils. Symptoms include swollen or tender salivary glands, low fever, tiredness and muscle aches. People who think they have mumps should contact their health care provider and remain at home.  The MMR vaccine provides the best protection against the disease. Two doses of the vaccine are 88 percent effective at protecting against mumps and one dose is 78 percent effective. Being fully vaccinated can help protect loved ones, family members, friends, classmates and coworkers.

The MMR vaccine is available at local pharmacies across the state. To locate a vaccinating pharmacy nearest you, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/vaccinesimmunizations/vaccine-locators/ or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

Additional information about mumps and the ongoing investigation can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/department-of-health-investigating-mumps-cases/.

Army Soldier Surfing Dies in Hawaii When Fishing Boat Runs Over Him

An accident this morning at Waianae Small Boat Harbor involving a fishing boat and a man on a surfboard resulted in the death of the man. According to the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE), sometime between 7 to 7:30, a man staying at the nearby Waianae Rest Camp was on a surfboard just outside the harbor. A 21-foot recreational powerboat exiting the harbor ran over the man. He is in the Army stationed at Fort Shafter.

The man was brought back to shore by the vessel with assistance from a commercial tour boat.

Honolulu Police (HPD) and Fire and DOCARE responded. HPD is taking the lead in the investigation, with assistance from DOCARE.

DLNR extends its deepest sympathy to the man’s family.

Big Island Chocolate Festival Awards $17,500 to Four Local Beneficiaries

Proceeds totaling $17,500 from the 2017 Big Island Chocolate Festival (BICF) were awarded to four local organizations at the event’s recent volunteer appreciation celebration.

Displaying their beneficiary checks with Kona Cacao Association President Farsheed Bonakdar (center) are from left: Ashley Pendergast of Waimea Country School’s Na Keiki Aloha ‘Aina program, Heidi Noche and Dana Mattos of Kona Dance & Performing Arts, Patti Kimball and Nem Lau of Kona Kohala Chefs Association’s high school culinary program and Kayla Strom and Ambi Diggins of Kona Pacific Public Charter School.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), the BICF is an annual, two-day event offering agricultural and culinary learning experiences and competitions, plus a gala celebration of chocolate. The mission of KCA is to promote the local cacao industry by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. KCA membership is open to anyone wanting to help create a recognizable brand for Hawai‘i Island chocolate.

Mahalo to 2017 BICF event sponsors: Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, Guittard Chocolate Company, Prova, Valrohna USA, Cacao Barry, Barry Callebaut, ChoiceMART, Kona Auto Center, Dolphin Journeys, Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Amoretti, Cocoa Outlet, Kona Brewing Company, Young’s Market, Waialua Estate Coffee & Chocolate, XPress Reprographics, The Spoon Shop, Island Asphalt Maintenance, DHX, Island Air, Republica Del Cacao, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, Pivotal Shift Consulting Group, Hawaii Coffee Connection, First American Title and TheWave@92FM.  #BIChocoFest, #ChocolateGold

For more information, visit http://konacacaoassociation.com and www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Kailua Bay Water Quality Returns to Normal Bacteria Levels

This is a Civil Defense Sewage Spill Update Message for Thursday, June 15 at 3:00 pm. The Department of Health has determined that Kailua Bay water quality has returned to normal bacteria levels and Kailua Bay is opened at this time to water activities.

The Department of Environmental Management reports that repairs to the ruptured main at Alii Drive and Palani Road are completed with final pavement work to come at a later date.

This will be the final message for this incident.  Thank you for your patience.  Have a safe day. This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense.

“Family Fourth” at Waikoloa Beach Resort – July 4th

From the big splash of a thousand yellow ducks to the fantastic fireworks finale with music by the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific, the Family Fourth is a great way to celebrate the red, white and blue. Waikoloa Beach Resort’s free, all-day event features nonstop entertainment, balloon art, carnival games and treats for all ages, from 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., at Kings’ Shops, Queens’ MarketPlace and Waikoloa Bowl.

Family Fourth begins at 10:30 a.m. with opening oli (chant) and traditional hula kahiko at Kings’ Shops, followed by Hawaiian music from Komakakino. Leading up to the big race at 3 p.m., great entertainment by Micah De Aguiar with Kuleana, and Lito Arkangel. And afterward, one of Hawaii’s favorite singer-songwriters, John Cruz. (See schedule below). Special promotions will be offered from select merchants throughout the Shops.

The 26th Annual Rubber Duckie Race, is a major fundraiser for the United Cerebral Palsy Association of Hawaii (UCPA). Thousands of rubber duckies are adopted by people from near and far, who gather around Kings’ Lake to watch their ducks take the plunge, and cheer them on to the finish line. Winners reward their owners with valuable prizes. To adopt a duck, call Kings’ Shops office, at 886-8811. All proceeds benefit UCPA of Hawai‘i.

At Queens’ MarketPlace, salsa lovers from around the island bring their dancing shoes to join the Salsa Latinos at the Coronation Pavilion at 12 noon. At the same time, attendees can enjoy a fun selection of Carnival Games with prizes, amazing balloon-twist art by Balloon Monsoon, and cotton candy and popcorn stands. Tomi Isobe Blues Band, DamStr8, Lorenzo’s Army and the Larry Dupio Blues Band fill the day with music.

Doors open to Waikoloa Bowl at 4:30 p.m., for an exciting concert by Tomi Isobe Blues Band and the powerful sound of the United States Air Force Band of the Pacific, followed by a fireworks extravaganza.

From their station at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, the Band travels across the Islands, to Japan and throughout the Pacific region to perform hundreds of musical concerts each year. For Family Fourth, the Band will be playing a variety of pop, rock and R&B hits, as well as patriotic music for the fireworks extravaganza that lights up the sky at Waikoloa Bowl.

Beach mats or chairs are welcome for open lawn seating in Waikoloa Bowl. Coolers and alcoholic beverages are not permitted. This is a non-smoking event. Waikoloa Beach Resort would like to thank the Hawaii County Fire Department for co-sponsoring the community fireworks display. For more information visit www.WaikoloaBeachResort.com or call Queens’ MarketPlace office at 886-8822.

July 4 Schedule of Events:

Kings’ Shops

  • 10:30 a.m.  Opening chant and hula kahiko
  • 11 a.m.  Komakakino with Hālau
  • 12 p.m.  Micah De Aguiar with Kuleana
  • 1:30 p.m.  Watermelon Eating Contest
  • 2 p.m.  Lito Arkangel
  • 3 p.m.  26th Annual Rubber Duckie Race for UCPA of Hawai‘i
  • 3:30 p.m.  John Cruz
  • 4:30 p.m.  Duck Calling and Duck Waddling Contests
  • 5:30 p.m.  Award Ceremony at Center Stage

Queens’ MarketPlace, Coronation Pavilion

  • 12 p.m.  Salsa Latinos
  • 12-5 p.m.  Cotton candy, popcorn, balloon art by Balloon Monsoon, Carnival games throughout Queens’ MarketPlace
  • 2 p.m.  Tomi Isobe Blues Band
  • 3 p.m.  DamStr8
  • 4 p.m.  Lorenzo’s Army
  • 5 p.m.  Larry Dupio Blues Band
  • 8:30 p.m.  Music by Full Circle at the Coronation Pavilion, to wind down the night

Waikoloa Bowl

  • 4:30 p.m.  Entrances open to Waikoloa Bowl
  • 5 p.m.  Music by Tomi Isobe Blues Band
  • 6:30 p.m.  United States Air Force Band of the Pacific
  • 8 p.m.  FIREWORKS SHOW

For more information visit www.QueensMarketPlace.net or call 886-8822.

Lawsuit Launched to Stop Hawaii’s Airport, Harbor Lights From Killing Rare Seabirds

Conservation groups today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the Hawaii Department of Transportation for failing to prevent bright lighting at state-operated airports and harbors on Kauai, Maui and Lānai from causing injuries and death to three species of critically imperiled seabirds.

The Newell’s shearwater is a threatened species, and Hawaiian petrels and band-rumped storm petrels in Hawaii are endangered species. According to today’s notice from Hui Ho‘omalu i Ka ‘Āina, Conservation Council for Hawai‘i and the Center for Biological Diversity, represented by nonprofit law firm Earthjustice, the department’s failure to protect these native seabirds from harmful operations at its facilities violates the federal Endangered Species Act.

“Since ancient times, Hawaiian fishermen have looked to the ‘a‘o (Newell’s shearwater) to help them find fish,” said Kauai fisherman Jeff Chandler of Hui Ho‘omalu i Ka ‘Āina, which works to protect cultural and natural resources. “They’re an important part of our culture, and the Department of Transportation needs to take seriously its kuleana (responsibility) to protect them.”

The seabirds circle the bright lights at the department’s facilities until they fall to the ground from exhaustion or crash into nearby buildings. Bright lights have contributed significantly to the catastrophic 94 percent decline in the population of threatened Newell’s shearwaters on Kauai since the 1990s. They have also harmed endangered Hawaiian petrels, whose numbers on Kauai have plummeted by 78 percent in the same period.

“Fixing the lights so these magnificent seabirds on the brink of extinction aren’t killed is completely feasible,” said Brian Segee, an attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Instead, the department is doing everything in its power to avoid protecting these highly imperiled native Hawaiian birds. It’s worse than irresponsible — it’s unethical and illegal.”

Last October the department abruptly broke off discussions with federal and state wildlife agencies regarding its participation in an island-wide habitat conservation plan to minimize and mitigate harm to the rare seabirds on Kauai.

“By withdrawing from talks on Kauai, the department left the county of Kauai and private entities holding the bag to address harm from the airports and harbors, even though the department’s facilities are among the largest sources of illegal death and injury on the island,” said Marjorie Ziegler of Conservation Council for Hawai‘i. “The department needs to fulfill its duty under Hawaii’s constitution to conserve and protect our natural heritage, not stick its head in the sand and do nothing.”

The groups seek to compel the department to comply with its obligations under the Endangered Species Act to minimize and mitigate harm to the imperiled seabirds by securing incidental take permit coverage of its activities on all three islands. The Act requires that citizens provide 60 days’ advance notice before filing a lawsuit to address illegal activities.

“Time is running out for these rare and culturally important seabirds,” said David Henkin, an Earthjustice attorney representing the groups. “If the Hawaii Department of Transportation continues to shirk its obligations under the Endangered Species Act, we’ll see them in court.”

Click to read full letter

Parker School Receives Seven-Year Accreditation

Parker School is pleased to announce that it has received a seven-year accreditation term from the Western Association of Colleges and Schools (WASC) and the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS). This is the longest term the accrediting body awards, and Parker School’s third full-term award since its original accreditation.

In a comprehensive report on the state of the school, the accreditation team noted, “Above all, what has always made Parker a special school is its nurturing of what we call `ohana.  This connection between students, teachers, staff, families, and administrators colors every moment of every day at Parker School and is continuously renewed through the graduations of confident, well-rounded, college-ready seniors and the admission of new children.  As it celebrates its 40th Anniversary, Parker School thrives as a more directed, energetic learning environment than ever before in its history.”

Parker School five-member accreditation team was comprised of representatives from academic institutions throughout the state:  Edna Hussey (Lower School Principal, Mid-Pacific Institute), Nina Buchanan (Professor Emerita, UH-Hilo), Kathleen Hogarty (Director of Development, Seabury Hall), Cristy Peeren (Elementary Department Head, Island School), and Dory Shigematsu (Curriculum & Assessment Coordinator, Kamehameha Schools Keaau).

“We were impressed with the team and their tireless efforts in a thorough accreditation study and visit,” said Carl Sturges, Parker School’s Headmaster. “We are thrilled that Parker has been recognized again by WASC and HAIS in receiving this full, seven-year accreditation. The process was invaluable as it motivated us to look carefully at the current state of the school, celebrate our accomplishments and identify areas for growth as we plan for the future.”

Accreditation certifies to colleges, universities and the general public that the school is a trustworthy institution of learning, and that it provides the quality of education promised in its mission and values. Accreditation serves as independent validation of the integrity of the school’s program and the value of a Parker School diploma.