• Follow on Facebook

  • air-tour-kauai
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    May 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Apr    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Mortality Thought to be Caused by Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death Increases By 50% – No Evidence Fungus Has Spread to Other Islands

The most recent aerial surveys of ohia forests on O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i, Moloka‘i,and Lāna‘i paint a good-news, bad-news picture. The good news is there are no confirmed cases of this fast-spreading fungal infection in ʻōhiʻa forests on any island other than the Big Island. The bad news is, the area of mortality thought to be caused by ROD has increased 50% on Hawai‘i island compared to DLNR’s previous survey in 2016.

DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) State Resource and Survey Forester Philipp LaHeala Walter explained, “Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death continues to spread at an alarming speed. It appears the original outbreaks are increasing in size and the disease is moving north along the Hamakua coast of Hawai‘i Island.” He added, “The aerial surveys we conducted across the state over the past couple of months, give us the first indications of the presence of this disease, but until we do ground surveys and sample the trees showing symptoms of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, we can’t positively confirm it, as there are numerous diseases that can damage or kill ʻōhiʻa.”

Specially trained surveyors assessed over 82% (over 780,000 acres) of the state’s ʻōhiʻa forest for the most recent helicopter surveys. On the Big Island they spotted an additional 26,000 acres of forest where ʻōhiʻa trees had brown leaves or were devoid of leaves. That’s added to more than 48,000 acres identified in the July 2016 survey, giving Hawai‘i island a potential Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death infestation of some 75,000 acres.

Survey technology continues to become more sophisticated and survey teams on all islands are using standardized methodologies both from the air and on the ground in follow-up confirmation surveys. The state legislature has provided $1.5 million dollars for the next two fiscal years for the continuation of surveys and other Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death initiatives to try and identify its cause and stop its spread. DOFAW Protection Forester Rob Hauff said, “The quarantine imposed by the State Dept. of Agriculture, on the movement of ʻōhiʻa wood and plant materials between islands, is helping prevent the spread of this fungal disease off of Hawai‘i Island. We continue to encourage everyone to become aware of the quarantine rules and to practice the appropriate protocols when working or playing in any of Hawai‘i’s forests.”

Rapid Ohia Death Statewide Survey Results from Hawaii DLNR on Vimeo.

Drinks, Food, Flowers, Fun at Orchid Show Preview Party

On June 1, the Hilo Orchid Show kicks off with a gala Preview Party from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Edith Kanaka‘ole Stadium.  All ticket proceeds benefit the non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center.

“The evening gala is a truly a ‘fun’-raiser.  People drink, eat, socialize, and have the first chance to shop for beautiful, unique, and rare orchid plants,” said Ku‘ikahi Executive Director Julie Mitchell.

“This year we’ve added reserved tables for 5 or 10 people, which are available at platinum, gold, silver, or bronze sponsorship levels,” noted Mitchell.  “We hope the community will come out to enjoy a fun party and support the cause of ‘Finding Solutions, Growing Peace.’”

The benefit party features a selection of beverages, catered food, live music, and orchid pre-sales.  The event is zero waste, with eco-friendly eating utensils, plus recycling/composting stations.

Each party-goer receives a souvenir glass, in order to enjoy the libations and take home after the event.  A wide variety of fine wines, beer on tap from Kona Brewing Co., gourmet lilikoi and dragon fruit juices, and coffee from Hilo Coffee Mill are served.

Hilo Orchid Show Gala Preview Party is Thursday, June 1 at the Edith Kanaka‘ole Stadium

Pupu, dinner, and dessert buffets are compliments of Island Naturals Market & Deli and AJ & Sons Catering, featuring the food stylings of Dean Shigeoka and Audrey Wilson, the food columnist for the Hawaii Tribune-Herald.

On the menu are bacon, lettuce, and tomato rolls; gingered chicken; orange cream roasted duck on won ton chips; fried adobo chicken; house made “spam” with Hilo fried rice musubi; and sous vide short ribs with ginger gems.

Also served are quinoa kale salad, ulu salad with apples, cobb salad, and hydroponic greens with lilikoi dressing.  Pupu include various types of sushi including vegetarian; assorted cheeses, breads, and olives; and hummus and olive caper tapenade.  And for dessert are assorted fruits, panna cotta with fruit compote, and haupia with toasted coconut topping.

Tickets for the Preview Party are $70 (of which $25 is tax deductible) and may be purchased in advance from The Most Irresistible Shop, Hilo Coffee Mill, Day-Lum Properties, and Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center.  For reservations or sponsorship opportunities, contact Jenifer at (808) 935-7844 x 1 or jenifer@hawaiimediation.org.  Tickets are also available at the door.

“Mediation is an empowerment model for shared decision-making.  Mediation encourages self-determination and provides a safe space for all voices to be heard,” Mitchell shared.  “We need more peace building programs on Hawai‘i Island.  Funds raised at this event make that happen.  Please join us.  Change a life.”

Pasha Hawaii Announces Shipyard for Two New Containerships – Delivery of Vessels Planned for 2020

Honolulu-based Pasha Hawaii announced that the company has selected Keppel AmFELS in Brownsville, TX, a subsidiary of Keppel Offshore & Marine (Keppel O&M) for the construction of two new Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fueled containerships, with the option to order two additional vessels. Pasha Hawaii is in the process of finalizing contract specifications.

The new U.S. Jones Act vessels will carry 2,525 TEUs, including a fully laden capacity of 500 45-foot containers, 400 refrigerated containers, and 300 40-foot dry containers, with a sailing speed of 23.0 knots. Delivery of the first vessel is expected 1Q 2020, with delivery of the second vessel in 3Q 2020.

“Keppel O&M’s technical expertise in LNG propulsion and commitment to customer service were two very important factors in our selection decision,” said George Pasha, IV, President and CEO. “From the start, they went above and beyond and worked closely with us in customizing a vessel design that matched our requirements. Their experience in LNG vessel conversions will also prove to be very valuable as we build LNG dual-fueled vessels for the Hawaii trade.”

The new vessels will operate fully on LNG from day one in service, dramatically reducing environmental impact and increasing fuel efficiency. Energy savings will also be achieved with a state-of-the-art engine, an optimized hull form, and an underwater propulsion system with a high-efficiency rudder and propeller.

When compared to conventional fuels, LNG is a much cleaner alternative fuel for shipping and offers significant environmental benefits, including the reduction of up to 95 percent sulphur oxides, nearly 100 percent particulate matter, up to 90 percent nitrogen oxides, and up to 25 percent carbon dioxide emissions from engine exhaust emissions.

“As with the construction of our Jean Anne and Marjorie C, we look forward to working with an extremely qualified shipyard, based in the United States,” added Pasha, IV. “Pasha Hawaii is a firm believer in the Jones Act, and is proud to support our shipyards and the highly skilled workers who make valuable contributions to this important industry on a daily basis.”

Pasha Hawaii is a wholly owned subsidiary of the family-owned global logistics and transportation company, The Pasha Group, one of the nation’s leading Jones Act shipping and integrated logistics companies.

UH Hilo Chancellor’s Scholarship Recipients Named

Thirteen students from Hawaiʻi’s public and private high schools have been awarded the prestigious Chancellor’s Scholarship by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

The award, valued in excess of $28,000, covers four years of tuition for students graduating from a Hawaiʻi high school who earned either a GPA of at least 3.5, a combined 1800 SAT (reading, writing, math) or a composite score of 27 on the ACT while demonstrating leadership and/or community service.

Chancellor’s Scholars are required to enroll as full-time students and earn a minimum of 24 credits each academic year. They must also maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and participate in leadership activities and/or community service with other Chancellor’s Scholars.

The 2017-2018 recipients and their respective high schools include:

  • Hailey Briseno, Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy
  • Kekamamakoaaka`ilihou Caceres, Kamehameha – Kapalama
  • Scott Dakofsky, Roosevelt High School
  • Ariana Dolan, Pearl City High School
  • Skyla Elder, Honoka`a High School
  • Kaitlyn Evans, Kamehameha – Maui
  • Presly Kaanaana, Kamehameha – Kapalama
  • Polina Kozinskiy, Laupahoehoe PCS
  • Sophia Smith, Hawaiʻi Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • Jaron Sugimoto, Waipahu High School
  • Naneaikealau Thomas, Kamehameha – Hawaiʻi
  • Vanessa Watkins, Waiakea High School
  • Kamamaluwaiwai Wichimai, Kamehameha – Hawaiʻi

Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Hears Arguments in Hawaii v. Trump

A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals sitting in Seattle heard arguments today in Hawaii v. Trump. The panel consisted of Judge Ronald Gould, Judge Michael Hawkins, and Judge Richard Paez.

Attorney General Chin said: “In today’s argument, we asked the court to uphold Judge Watson’s order issuing a nationwide injunction against the second travel ban. We urged the court that Judge Watson’s well-reasoned decision should be affirmed. As expected, the panel judges asked informed and probing questions of both parties. We look forward to the court’s ruling.”

In his ruling issuing the nationwide injunction, Judge Watson wrote that “a reasonable, objective observer — enlightened by the specific historical context, contemporaneous public statements, and specific sequence of events leading to its issuance — would conclude that the Executive Order was issued with a purpose to disfavor a particular religion.”

Here is a brief timeline of events that led to today’s hearing:

  • January 27 – President Trump issued the first executive order. It banned entry for 90 days by citizens from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. The order also indefinitely halted refugees from Syria.
  • February 3 – U.S. District Court Judge James Robart in Washington issued an order blocking the ban nationwide.
  • February 9 – A three-judge panel in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed Judge Robart’s injunction. The panel consisted of Judge William Canby, Judge Richard Clifton, and Judge Michelle Friedland.
  • March 6 – President Trump issued the second executive order. It excluded Iraq from the list of Muslim-majority countries whose citizens were temporarily blocked. The ban, which was set to take effect on March 16, barred foreign nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the United States for 90 days and all refugees for 120 days.
  • March 7 Hawaii filed the first challenge against the second travel ban.
  • March 15 – U.S. District Court Judge Derrick Watson in Hawaii blocked the second travel ban hours before it was set to begin. The temporary restraining order applied nationwide.
  • March 29 – Judge Watson granted the State’s request for a longer-term halt of the revised travel ban executive order.
  • April 7 – Department of Justice filed an opening brief seeking to overturn the preliminary injunction.

There is no set timeline for when the panel may issue a ruling. The injunction against the travel ban remains in place until the Ninth Circuit rules.