• Follow on Facebook

  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    April 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Mar   May »
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    30  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Hawaii State Capital Improvement Project Highlights – CIP Part of Fiscal Years 2018, 2019 Budget

As part of the state budget bill passed in conference committee yesterday, lawmakers included funding for Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) statewide.

Representative Sylvia Luke and Senator Jill Tokuda co-chaired the conference committee and Rep. Kyle Yamashita and Senator Donovan Dela Cruz managed the CIP funding.

Capital Improvement Projects are renovations, repairs, and major maintenance to existing facilities, landscape improvements, new construction, land acquisition, and utility modifications.

Capital Improvement Projects Biennium Budget Totals (not including CIP grants-in-aid):

  • FY2018: $1,007.9 billion General Obligation Bond Funds
  • FY2019: $49.4 million General Obligation Bond Funds
  • FY2018: $2,269.7 billion All Means of Financing Funds
  • FY2019: $695.1 million All Means of Financing Funds

CIP highlights

Agriculture

  • $608 thousand for invasive species treatment units.
  • $1.2 million for improvements to the Waimanalo irrigation system.
  • $4 million for improvements to the Waiahole water system.

Accounting and General Services

  • $10 million for master plans and an environmental impact study for Aloha Stadium.
  • $15 million for improvements and maintenance of existing public facilities and sites, statewide.

Business, Economic Development, and Tourism

  • $3 million for an underground utility distribution system in Kalaeloa.
  • $25 million for the Rental Housing Revolving Fund and $25 million for the Dwelling Unit Revolving Fund to finance additional affordable rental housing.
  • $1 million for transit-oriented development master plan of state-owned parcels near proposed rail stations.

Defense

  • $6 million to retrofit buildings with hurricane protective measures to increase the number of emergency shelters, statewide.
  • $5 million for incremental addition, replacement, and upgrade of the state Civil Defense warning and communications equipment, statewide.

Education

  • $90 million to address condition for school facilities statewide.
  • $32.9 million to address equity for school facilities statewide.
  • $32.9 million to address program support for school facilities statewide.
  • $27 million for a new classroom building at Campbell High School.
  • $77 million for the construction of the new East Kapolei Middle School.
  • $63 million for the construction of Kihei High School
  • $11.5 million for the construction of a fifteen classroom building at Mililani Middle School
  • $12.3 million for the construction of a new administration building at Waihee Elementary School.
  • $15 million for the construction of a performing arts center at Moanalua High School
  • $15 million for Phase I of a new classroom building at Waipahu High School.
  • $10 million for the new Pohukaina Elementary School.
  • $6.5 million for health, safety, accessibility, and other code requirements for public libraries, statewide.

Hawaiian Home Lands

  • $19.4 million for the development of Hawaiian Home Lands’ lots.
  • $7.6 million for repair and maintenance projects on Hawaiian Home Lands.

Human Services

  • $20.1 million for site, dwelling, and security improvements at Hawaii Public Housing Authority facilities.

Health

  • $1.6 million for improvements and renovations to the Kahuku Medical Center.
  • $19.9 million for improvements and renovations to the Hawaii Health Systems Corporation, statewide.
  • $2.1 million to modernize elevators at Diamond Head, Lanakila, and Leeward Health Centers.
  • $4.5 million for re-roofing, interior and exterior improvements to the Hilo Counseling Center and Keawe Health Center.

Land and Natural Resources

  • $2.2 million for assessments, maintenance, and remediation of dams under the jurisdiction of the Department of Land and Natural Resources.
  • $5 million for dredging and related improvements to the Ala Wai Canal.
  • $3 million for rockfall and flood mitigation at various locations, statewide.
  • $9.3 million for Kaanapali beach restoration and berm enhancement.
  • $100,000 for hazardous tree mitigation in forest reserves, game management areas, natural area reserves, and wildlife sanctuaries.
  • $400,000 to provide statewide support for fire and natural disaster response.
  • $2.5 million for improvements at various boating facilities, statewide.
  • $3 million for flood damage reconstruction at the Iao Valley State Monument, Maui.
  • $20.3 million for construction and improvements at small boat harbors, statewide.

Public Safety

  • $34.4 million for new additions, renovations, alterations, electrical and mechanical infrastructure improvements and rehabilitation of buildings, at Public Safety facilities, statewide.
  • $8 million for a new consolidated women’s housing associated support office, and other improvements at the Women’s Community Correctional Center, Oahu.

Transportation

  • $31.6 million for renovations and new restroom facilities at various airports statewide.
  • $170 million for improvements to the overseas terminal ticket lobby at Honolulu International Airport, Oahu.
  • $30 million for improvements at gates 29 and 34 to accommodate A380 Aircraft at Honolulu International Airport, Oahu.
  • $8.7 million for a new United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Inspection Station at Kona International Airport, Hawaii.
  • $39.2 million for holdroom and gate improvements at Kahului Airport, Maui.
  • $10.5 million for inbound baggage handling system improvements, Kahului Airport, Maui.
  • $7.2 million for terminal improvements at Molokai Airport, Molokai.
  • $4.5 million for a new aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) garage, renovation of the terminal, and replacement of airfield lighting at Kalaupapa Airport, Maui
  • $17.8 million for ticket lobby and holdroom improvements at Lihue Airport, Kauai.
  • $7.5 million to address storm water run-off, erosion, passenger safety issues, ineffective drainage, and/or subsurface irregularities at Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai.
  • $190.6 million for the repair, rehabilitation, improvements, and/or replacement of bridges, statewide.
  • $56.8 million for improvements, installation, or upgrading of guardrails and shoulders on state highways, statewide.
  • $89 million for a new roadway and/or realignment, and extending the Daniel K. Inouye Highway from the Hilo Terminus to the Queen Kaahumanu Highway, Hawaii.
  • $50 million for shoreline protection, highway realignment, and beach fill/nourishment for state highways, statewide.

University of Hawaii

  • $30 million for the Culinary Institute of the Pacific, Phase II at Kapiolani Community College, Oahu.
  • $5 million for renovations at Snyder Hall, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Oahu.
  • $83.2 million for the renewal, improvements, and modernization of facilities at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • $10 million for capital renewal and deferred maintenance at University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Statewide.
  • $10 million for minor capital improvement projects at University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Statewide.

Lobster and Kona Crab Season Closes Monday, May 1

If you love your fresh-caught local lobster or Kona crab, remember the closed season for ula (spiny lobster), ula papapa (slipper lobster) and Kona crab runs from May 1 through the end of August.  During that time it’s illegal to take, possess, or sell these shellfish.

According to Suzanne Case, chairperson of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, “These rules are in place to protect lobsters and Kona crabs during the summer months, which are the peak of their reproductive season, and to help ensure their populations will continue to be sustainable.”

However, any commercial marine dealer may sell, or any hotel, restaurant, or other public eating house may serve spiny or slipper lobster lawfully caught during the open season by first obtaining a license to do so, pursuant to section 13-74-41, Hawaii Administrative Rules.

During the open season catching, taking or possessing of female spiny and slipper lobsters and female Kona crab is prohibited.  Also, any spiny or slipper lobster, or Kona crab, caught with eggs must immediately be returned to the waters from which it was taken. Taking or killing of females is prohibited year round.

The Hawai‘i Fishing Regulations booklet, available at all Division of Aquatic Resources offices and most fishing supply stores, shows how to determine the sex of spiny lobsters and Kona crabs.  Or go online to http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/fishing/fishing-regulations/marine-invertebrates/how-to-determine-sex-of-regulated-invertebrates/

For more information on regulations concerning these and other marine invertebrates, including minimum sizes, go to http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/fishing/fishing-regulations/marine-invertebrates/  or call the Division of Aquatic Resources.

To report any violation of these or other fishing regulations call the Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement at 643-DLNR.

Island Air and JIN Air Enter Interline Agreement to Connect Customers Between South Korea and Hawaiian Islands

Island Air and Jin Air have entered into an interline partnership which allows travelers to conveniently book connections between Jin Air’s network throughout Korea and South East Asia and Island Air’s destinations in the Hawaiian Islands.

Jin Air B777-200ER

The interline agreement, which goes into effect on April 26, 2017, means customers traveling on Jin Air between Honolulu and Seoul can connect seamlessly to a neighbor island on Island Air, booking the reservation on a single ticket and checking luggage through to their final destination. The two airlines will have three interline routes, including Incheon-Honolulu-Kahului, Incheon-Honolulu-Kona, and Incheon-Honolulu-Līhu‘e.

Starting May 29, Jin Air, which first launched service to Hawai‘i in December 2015, will offer Honolulu service five times each week (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday) between Honolulu and Seoul. Jin Air will start interline sales on April 26.

“Island Air’s interline partnership with Jin Air provides another convenient option for visitors from Korea and other Asian markets to explore the Hawaiian Islands, while also expanding connections to Asia for our local residents,” said David Uchiyama, Island Air president and CEO. “This latest ticketing and baggage agreement with Jin Air is part of Island Air’s continuing commitment to enhance the overall travel experience for customers and to provide more opportunities for travelers to ‘Fly the Island Way’.”

Jin Air said, “With the operation of Jin Air’s only long-distance route (Incheon-Honolulu), we will build a network to the Islands of Hawai‘i through interline sales with Island Air. We will continue to strengthen our differentiation strategy with other airlines to improve customer convenience.”

In addition to Jin Air, Island Air maintains interline agreements with nine other domestic and international airlines, including American Airlines, Alaska Airlines, China Airlines, Delta, Hawaiian Airlines, Japan Airlines, ANA, Philippine Airlines and Qantas. Island Air also has been a codeshare partner with United Airlines since 2005, which includes joint frequent flyer benefits.

Island Air offers 280 flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island and plans to increase the number of interisland flights per week to more than 400 by May 1. Island Air’s flight schedule can be viewed at https://www.islandair.com/flight-schedules. Reservations can be made online at www.islandair.com or by calling (800) 652-6541.

VOICES Brings Vocal Ensemble Concert to Hilo

The ensemble VOICES, led by local voice teacher Mark Sheffield under the auspices of his Mark Alan VocalWorks studio, will bring their unique interpretations of classics and new favorites to Hilo. The group’s pianist is Kanako Okita. Showtimes are Friday, May 12, and Saturday, May 13, at 7:30 p.m. at the First United Protestant Church.  Admission is free and by donation, with a suggested donation of $10.00. For more information, call 238-6040.

Mark Sheffield

The evening’s program, entitled That’s Life, presents music for ensemble and solo voices both a capella and with piano, especially chosen to highlight the seasons of the year and the seasons of life.  From songs which may be new to the audience to beloved classics of stage and screen, the recital brings to life old favorites and new gems. With composers as varied as Eric Whitacre and Lili Boulanger, and songs as varied as the sacred My Song in the Night by Mack Wilberg and Africa by Toto, the concert promises something for every fan of vocal music. Solos and small ensembles intermingle with full ensemble numbers to provide variety and interest.

Mark Sheffield, Tenor and Voice Teacher, began his studio in Hilo over a decade ago. In that time he has given students success in local theater productions and concerts. He has also sent students to further study and to careers in professional theater and music. His work as a voice teacher has been highly regarded for his skill in bringing each singer’s true voice forward. Now, his students make up the personnel of his new group VOICES.

VOICES, a vocal ensemble consisting entirely of students in Sheffield’s Mark Alan VocalWorks studio, gives Sheffield’s advanced students the additional challenge of learning and performing challenging ensemble music within the context of Sheffield’s instruction in vocal technique and interpretation. Last year’s debut concert of the group included staged theatricality as well as new interpretations of songs from classic to modern. VOICES has also performed on the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center stage, featured in recent UH Hilo choral concerts. Beyond this, VOICES and its less formal predecessor has a decade-long history of performing to acclaim at the annual Keaau Christmas Parade.

Asked about how he came to create That’s Life, Sheffield said, “I was inspired by the seasons of life, and how they fit with the four seasons of Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. This program takes VOICES and the audience on a life journey through youth to maturity and venerable age. We end with a note of hope and timelessness that surpasses all seasons, whether of weather or life. The concert includes songs in a rich variety of styles designed to showcase the brilliance of the ensemble as well as the theme of the evening.” Sheffield continued, “This concert is our second full-length concert, presented as a gift to our community. We appreciate your support, we welcome your donations toward our future endeavors, and we look forward to seeing you at That’s Life. Please do come and join us in this evening of vocal excellence.”

VOICES: That’s Life comes to Hilo May 12 and 13, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. at the First United Protestant Church for two shows only.  Admission is free and by donation, with a suggested donation of $10.00. Donations accepted at the door. Call 238-6040 for more information.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 15-Year-Old Hilo Boy

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 15-year-old Hilo boy, who was reported missing.

No photo was made available

Anthony Souza was last seen in Hilo on January 31, 2017. He is also known to frequent the Puna district.

He is described as Caucasian, 5-foot-6, 130 pounds with short brown hair and hazel eyes. He has the word “Puna” tattooed on his right forearm and a tribal tattoo on his left calf. Souza was last seen wearing a maroon-colored shirt, gray shorts, knee-high socks and camouflage-colored Crocs.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts contact Officer Daniel Kuwabara at 961-2213, or to call the Police Departments non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Former Heald College Students Eligible for Federal Student Loan Cancellation and Refunds

The Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) Hawaii Post-secondary Education Authorization Program (HPEAP), joined with at least 42 other states and the District of Columbia, is notifying nearly 2,500 Hawaii residents who attended schools operated by Corinthian Colleges, Inc. – including Heald College in Honolulu – that they are eligible for cancellation of their federal student loans used to attend those schools.  If a student’s federal loan is cancelled, the student will make no more payments on the loan, and any payments already made will be refunded.

Approximately 2,474 Hawaii residents are eligible for federal student loan cancellation and will receive a letter explaining the relief available and enclosing a short application that must be filed with the U.S. Department of Education.

After intense scrutiny by various government entities, for-profit Corinthian Colleges abruptly ceased operations in 2015, transferring some of its campuses to a non-profit called Zenith Education Group.  The U.S. Department of Education then found that while it was operating, Corinthian Colleges made widespread misrepresentations between 2010 and 2014 about post-graduation employment rates at its Heald College campus, and elsewhere across the nation. Lists of the affected campuses, programs, and dates of enrollment are available at https://www.StudentAid.gov/heald-findings and at https://www.StudentAid.gov/ev-wy-findings.  Students who first enrolled in the identified campuses and programs during the specified time periods are eligible for streamlined discharge of their federal student loans.

“Former students are still unnecessarily paying for loans that should be forgiven,” said Bobbi Lum-Mew, HPEAP Program Administrator.  “This is the latest effort by state and federal officials to reach these Hawaii residents and put money back in their pockets.”

 HPEAP’s outreach will be sent to students who fall within the U.S. Department of Education’s findings of fraud discussed above, and who are eligible for a special “streamlined” process to discharge their federal student loans.  However, any student who attended Corinthian Colleges and believes that the school lied about job prospects, the transferability of credits, or other issues may apply to have their federal student loans canceled using the Department of Education’s universal discharge application at https://borrowerdischarge.ed.gov.  More information is available at https://studentaid.ed.gov/borrower-defense.

Borrowers should beware of student loan scams.  You can apply for loan forgiveness, or get information on loan forgiveness, for FREE through the U.S. Department of Education.  The U.S. Department of Education never charges application or maintenance fees, so if you’re asked to pay, walk away.

It may take time for the U.S. Dept. of Education to process applications, so anyone who applies for loan discharge should continue making payments on the affected loans until informed by the U.S. Dept. of Education or his loan servicer that his federal loans are in forbearance while his application is pending or that his loans have been cancelled.

If you have questions, more information about the Office’s outreach to former Corinthian Colleges students can be found at http://www.HealdOutreach.com.  Students can also call the U.S. Department of Education hotline at 1-855-279-6207 or e-mail questions about discharge of their federal student loans to FSAOperations@ed.gov.