• Follow on Facebook

  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • air-tour-kauai
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • Say When

    March 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Feb    
     1234
    567891011
    12131415161718
    19202122232425
    262728293031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

Nation’s First Judicial Outreach Week Comes to Hawaii

Commemorating America’s first National Judicial Outreach Week (March 5 – 11, 2017), Hawaii state judges are meeting with student and community groups to promote public understanding of the rule of law.  Judges will share their insights on how the courts apply this important concept in maintaining open and transparent government, ensuring fairness in our system of justice, and protecting the fundamental legal rights of all citizens.

Oahu Judge William Domingo shows a sketch of Lady Justice to 8th grade students who visited his courtroom at the First Circuit Court Building on March 7, 2017. Judge Domingo used the sketch to explain the Judiciary’s role in applying the rule of law equally for all people.

National Judicial Outreach Week is a new initiative of the American Bar Association Judicial Division, set to take place each year in the first full week of March.  During this week, judges and lawyers will host a variety of community engagements to discuss the rule of law – the legal principle that every citizen is subject to the law, including a country’s lawmakers, leaders, and judges.

“We are a nation where all people are equal under the law,” said Judge William Domingo.  “Our courts are the institutions charged with safeguarding this fundamental principle, so it is important for the public to have a firm understanding of the court and its legal processes.  This promotes trust in the fairness and impartiality of our system of justice.”

During the month of March, the Judiciary invites people to contact their local courthouse to inquire about having a judge speak to their school or community group on the rule of law, our system of justice, and the resources and public services available through the courts.

On Oahu (First Circuit) call the Judiciary History Center at (808) 539-4999.

On Maui, Molokai, and Lanai (Second Circuit) call the chambers of the Chief Judge at (808) 244-2860.

On Hawaii Island (Third Circuit) call the Program Services Branch at (808) 322-8726.

On Kauai (Fifth Circuit) call the Office of the Deputy Chief Court Administrator at (808) 482-2347.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 25-Year-Old Hilo Man

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 25-year-old Hilo man who was reported missing.


German Lee was last seen Thursday (March 2, 2017) in the area of Banyan Drive in Hilo.

He is described as part Hawaiian, 5-foot-3, 130 pounds with brown hair, brown eyes and small build.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential

Statement of Attorney General Doug Chin Regarding Activity Today in Hawaii vs. Trump

Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin confirmed today that the State of Hawaii intends to pursue legal action regarding President Trump’s new travel ban, which was issued yesterday. The State, together with the Department of Justice, asked Judge Derrick K. Watson for an expedited briefing schedule on a motion for temporary restraining order. If Judge Watson agrees, this schedule will allow the court to hear the State’s motion before the new travel ban goes into effect on March 16, 2017.

A copy of today’s filing is attached. The State anticipates filing a second amended complaint and a motion for temporary restraining order in the near future. Those documents will be available to the public after they have been filed in court.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 16-Year-Old Captain Cook Girl

UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 16-year-old Jade Yamashita of Captain Cook, who was reported missing.

She was found unharmed in Captain Cook on Thursday evening (March 9).

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Captain Cook girl who was reported missing.

Jade Yamashita was last seen in Captain Cook on February 12, 2017.

She is described as Japanese, 5-foot-7, 155 pounds, she has brown hair with red highlights, and brown eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hawaii State Civil Rights Commission Decries Threat Against Jewish Preschool

On behalf of the Hawaiʻi Civil Rights Commission, Chair Linda Hamilton Krieger today strongly condemned the threatening phone call made on Monday, February 27, 2017, that necessitated the evacuation of the Temple Emanu-El preschool, and renewed the Commission’s previous call for Hawaiʻi to stand against the national upsurge in discriminatory harassment and intimidation. “We must all come together to condemn this despicable, hateful act against Hawaii’s Jewish community,” said Krieger. “No one should have to live in fear because of their religion, just as no one should live in fear because of their national origin, race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, or immigration status.”

“It is sobering that this happened here in Hawaiʻi, in the context of threats against 20 Jewish community centers and day schools on the same day nationwide, as well as the bias-motivated shooting that took the life of an Indian man in Kansas last week,” added HCRC Executive Director William Hoshijo. “Those who share a commitment to civil rights must stand up for those who cannot stand alone, and condemn the post-election proliferation of anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim, and anti-immigrant attacks and threats, acts of vandalism, and hateful rhetoric.”

The Hawaiʻi Civil Rights Commission is responsible for enforcing, and will enforce, state civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, and

State-funded services. The HCRC stands in opposition to discriminatory harassment, whether in schools, workplaces, places of business, or in our communities.

If you feel you have been subjected to discrimination or harassment because of your race, ancestry, disability, sexual orientation, religion, sex, including gender identity, or other prohibited bases, contact the HCRC at telephone (808) 586-8636, or email DLIR.HCRC.INFOR@hawaii.gov.

For more information, go to the HCRC webpage at:  http://labor.hawaii.gov/hcrc/.

Record $394,000 Raised by Hawaii Food & Wine Festival

The Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival (HFWF), the state’s premier culinary event, raised a record $394,000 for local beneficiaries following another successful year. Fourteen nonprofit organizations received checks during a Mahalo Reception for the 2016 festival held on March 7th at Neiman Marcus’ Mariposa Restaurant. The $394,000 contribution brings the total giving from HFWF to nearly $1.7 million in six years.

“We’re proud that Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival not only shines a spotlight on Hawai’i as a culinary destination, but pays it forward through contributions for nonprofit charitable organizations that support local food sustainability, cultural, and educational programs” says Denise Yamaguchi, HFWF Chief Executive Officer. “The tangible impact of the festival is far-reaching, with funds supporting local culinary colleges, grants for Hawai‘i chefs to learn in the kitchens of the world’s  culinary masters, programs to help small farms get their produce to consumers, and curriculum to teach children how to grow their own food in school and make healthy dishes at home.”
2016 HFWF beneficiaries include:
  • Culinary Institute of the Pacific- $80,000
  • Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation- $70,000
  • Imua Family Services- $50,000
  • Kapi‘olani Community College Culinary Arts Program- $50,000
  • Ment’Or BKB Foundation- $29,000
  • Kapi‘olani Community College Hospitality and Tourism Program- $25,000
  • Leeward Community College Culinary Arts Program- $25,000
  • Maui County Farm Bureau- $20,000
  • Hawai‘i Island Community College Culinary Arts Program- $10,000
  • Paepae o He‘eia- $10,000
  • Papahana Kuaola- $10,000
  • Maui Culinary Academy- $7,500
  • Hawaii Seafood Council- $5,000
  • Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation- $2,500
In six years, HFWF has expanded from a 3-day festival with 30 chefs in Waikiki to more than 20 events spanning 3 Islands. HFWF16 welcomed 8,765 attendees from around the world to signature events on O’ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island featuring 114 top chefs, 50 wine makers, and 10 mixologists. That’s up 1,365 attendees from 2015. More than 200 Hawai‘i culinary students gained priceless experience working side-by-side with culinary masters.
“We wanted to make sure the chefs that we invited were going to be world class, at the same time have a real deep feeling about what Hawai‘i means to them” explains HFWF Co-Founder Roy Yamaguchi. “In that sense, we were looking for something to become big because we felt that we wanted to reach the entire world and we needed to have a quality festival and large enough festival to capture that.”
HFWF garnered nearly $11 million in publicity value from media coverage including Good Morning America, FOX News, USA Today, Fiji Times, Food and Wine, Eater San Francisco, Delta Sky Japan, The San Jose Mercury News, and Hawaii Chinese TV. Of the worldwide exposure, HFWF Co-Founder Alan Wong stresses, “The most important thing is, the spotlight has been put on Hawai‘i- on our tourism, our people, our culture, our food, what we grow here. It’s a win win win.”
The non-profit mission of the festival sets it apart from other notable food and wine events. “I think that really comes from the hearts of the chefs who got this going in the beginning” shares Dean Wong, Executive Director for Imua Family Services, a Maui beneficiary that received a check for $50,000. “They all wanted to give back to the community as well to support Hawai‘i and the tourism and the food industry in Hawai‘i. That speaks volumes of the Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival.”
HFWF is a program of the nonprofit, Hawai‘i Ag and Culinary Alliance. Its mission is to attract national and international attention to the extraordinary culinary talent, as well as the diversity of quality locally grown products to ensure Hawai‘i maintains its competitive edge as a world-class destination.
HFWF co-chair Alan Wong was featured at the Mahalo reception, along with chefs Mark Freiberg of Neiman Marcus, Chef Alan Takasaki from Le Bistro, and Chef Vikram Garg.

Pianist Mark Valenti at Kahilu Theatre

Friday, March 17 at 6pm, Kahilu Theatre presents Mark Valenti in the next installment of the Kahilu Steinway Series.

Mark Valenti received his Master of Music from Northwestern University, Bachelor of Music from the Philadelphia Musical Academy, and has studied with such notable teachers as Benjamin Whitten, Zoltan Kocsis, and Mary Sauer.

In addition to giving solo recitals in cities throughout the U.S., Mr. Valenti has performed in France, Belgium, Hungary, and Luxembourg as well as for former First Lady Barbara Bush in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Valenti has performed in recital live on WFMT classical radio. He has also done extensive work in the Jazz field including performances with Gregory Hines, Frank Foster, and Al Grey and has appeared on television with Joe Sudler’s Swing Machine and singer/actor Christopher Durham.

The program for the evening will include Karol Szymanowski Four Mazurkas, op. 50, Ludwig van Beethoven Sonata no.31 in A flat major, op. 110, Claude Debussy Three Etudes, Johannes Brahms Three Pieces, and Sergei Prokofieff Sonata #7 in B flat major, op. 83.

Doors open at 5pm for the performance on Friday, March 17 at 6pm, and there will be snacks and beverages available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar.

The Kahilu Steinway Series is a series of performances showcasing Kahilu Theatre’s Model D Steinway Concert Grand piano at accessible ticket prices. Entry is free for ages 18 and under.

Tickets are $28 / $23 / $18 / $8 and available for purchase online at http://www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, M-F 9am to 1pm.

The Steinway Series is made possible by sponsorship by Mike & Ruth Bernstone, Sharon Cornish-Martin, Karen Ferrara, Betty & Lee Meyerson, Dr. Marcia Wishnick & Mr. Stanley Wishnick, and Other Friends of Kahilu.

Tour Group Caught in Closed Area in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

A tour guide based in France and a tour group of 13 people were caught early Monday morning sneaking into the closed area at Halema‘uma‘u, the erupting summit crater of Kīlauea volcano.

Visitors observing the summit eruption of Kīlauea from the observation deck at Jaggar Museum, one mile away from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. NPS Photo

National Park Service law enforcement officers spotted the group just after midnight, and issued citations for violating the terms of the closure to all 14 people. The tour guide was issued additional citations for operating a non-permitted business in the park and creating a hazardous condition. All 14 were escorted out of the park.

The 44-year-old male tour guide, affiliated with the French tour company Adventure et Volcans, must make a mandatory court appearance and faces a maximum penalty of $5,000 and six months in jail. His name is being withheld as the investigation continues. The violation of closure citations are $100 each, with a $30 processing fee.

“This is a serious violation,” said Chief Ranger John Broward. “Areas surrounding Halema‘uma‘u Crater are closed because of extremely hazardous volcanic conditions that include high concentrations of toxic gases and particulates, ongoing volcanic explosions and frequent collapses of the crater walls,” he said.

Explosions from Halema‘uma‘u can occur anytime, without warning. Last August, a summit explosion hurled a layer of volcanic rock, lava bombs and molten spatter nearly 300 feet beyond the crater rim, and covered an area about 720 feet wide along the rim. It destroyed the power system of a U.S. Geological Survey instrument that was used for scientific research and monitoring volcanic activity. Last October, two explosions blasted lava spatter, rock and glassy particulates a quarter mile from the crater to the closed portion of Crater Rim Drive. In November, spatter from another lava lake explosion damaged the cable on a USGS webcam located on the rim of the crater.

Halema‘uma‘u Crater, a 4.7-mile section of Crater Rim Drive, and sections of the Halema‘uma‘u and Crater Rim trails, have been closed since the most recent summit eruption began in 2008.

“Visitors need to be aware that, while much of the attention lately has been on the hazards of the 61g ocean entry at Kamokuna, the park staff remains very concerned about the ongoing hazards in the vicinity of Halema‘uma‘u,” Chief Ranger Broward said. “Rangers will continue to monitor and take appropriate action to reduce the occurrence of risky behavior in both areas.”

Since July 2016, rangers have issued 35 citations for closure violations at Halema‘uma‘u, and nearly 100 citations at Kamokuna.