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Pēia ka manaʻo o ka Lunamakaʻāinana Tulsi Gabbard i kēia lā i hoʻomanaʻo i ka Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi

Washington, DC— Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) released the following statement today in commemoration of Hawaiian Language Month:

“People in Hawaiʻi, along with so many around the world, are able to take part in the unique history and culture of Hawaiʻi because of the work to preserve the Hawaiian language over many centuries. Today, the Hawaiian language is an important part of our day-to-day life in Hawaiʻi, woven in throughout our conversations, ever-present in local businesses and communities, and taught in schools across the state. As we commemorate Hawaiian Language Month, we must continue to foster and empower our keiki and communities to share and grow the use of Hawaiʻi’s native language throughout our islands. E ola ka olelo Hawaiʻi, let the Hawaiian language live.”

Background: The Hawaiian language is an official language in the State of Hawaiʻi, along with English. In 2012, an amendment to Hawaiʻi statutes provided that the month of February shall be known and designated as “ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi Month” to celebrate and encourage the use of the Hawaiian language. This measure was the first Act to be codified in Hawaiian and English, and stated: “Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi: E ʻike mau a e kapa ʻia ana aʻe ka mahina ʻo Pepeluali ʻo ia ka ‘Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi’ i mea e hoʻomaikaʻi a e paipai aku ai i ka ʻōlelo ʻana o ua ʻōlelo Makuahine nei lā.”


Wakinekona, DCPēia ka manaʻo o ka Lunamakaʻāinana Tulsi Gabbard i kēia lā i hoʻomanaʻo i ka Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi:

“He ʻōlelo ola o Hawaiʻi nei ka ʻōlelo Makuahine ma muli o nā keʻehina hoʻōla ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi i ʻauamo aloha ʻia no nā kenekulia i kaʻahope akula. ʻIke maoli ʻia ke ola o nei ʻōlelo ma nā ʻoihana, nā kaiāulu, a me nā kula a puni ʻo Hawaiʻi mokuʻāina. I kēia mahina hoʻomanaʻo, e hoʻomaopopo kākou i ke kuleana a kākou e kahukahu a hoʻāmana like ai no ke ola mau o ko Hawaiʻi ʻōlelo makuahine. “E ola ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi!” 

Mōʻaukala: ʻO ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi kekahi o nā ʻōlelo kūhelu ʻelua o Hawaiʻi mokuʻāina, pau pū me ka Pelekānia. Ma 2012 i hoʻoholo ʻia ai ʻo Pepeluali ka “Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi” i mea e pai aʻe ai i ke ola o ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. ʻO kēia ka ʻōlelo hoʻoholo mua i paʻa ma nā ʻōlelo kūhelu ʻelua ʻo ka Hawaiʻi lāua me ka Pelekānia penei: “Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi: E ʻike mau a e kapa ʻia ana aʻe ka mahina ʻo Pepeluali ʻo ia ka ‘Mahina ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi’ i mea e hoʻomaikaʻi a e paipai aku ai i ka ʻōlelo ʻana o ua ʻōlelo Makuahine nei lā.”

Translation provided courtesy of ‘Ōiwi TV

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Lawmakers Call For Reinstatement of Glass-Steagall

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) joined 26 Members of Congress in introducing the Return to Prudent Banking Act today. The bipartisan legislation, endorsed by Public Citizen and the AFL-CIO, would reinstate important consumer protections put in place after the Great Depression and require separation between commercial and investment banking.

(Left to right) Reps. Walter B. Jones, Tim Ryan, Tulsi Gabbard, and Marcy Kaptur call for a reinstatement of Glass-Steagall.

“From the Great Depression through the turn of the 21st Century, Glass-Steagall helped keep our economy safe. Repealing it allowed too-big-to-fail banks to gamble with the savings and livelihoods of the American people, with devastating, irrevocable consequences. Hawaiʻi, along with communities across the country, paid the price in 2008 with the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. Today, the banks that were “too big to fail” in 2008 are even bigger and more powerful now. We must reinstate Glass-Steagall and create a financial system that works for every American—not just Wall Street banks,” said Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02)

“The 2008 crash nearly took down our entire economy and led to the great recession which wiped out average Americans’ income. But now, Democrats and Republicans have memorialized support for Glass-Steagall in their respective political platforms. Even President Trump has declared his support for a new Glass-Steagall law,” said Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur (OH-09). “That is why we are here, to build on the momentum and the movement to reinstate Glass-Stegall.”

“Wall Street banks should not be allowed to use taxpayer-insured consumer deposits to gamble in the markets and then get taxpayer bailouts for failed decisions,” said Congressman Walter B. Jones (NC-03). “It’s time to put American taxpayers and depositors first.  It’s time to pass the Return to Prudent Banking Act and reinstate Glass-Steagall.”

“I am proud to cosponsor the Return to Prudent Banking Act, which revives the separation between commercial banking and securities companies as written in the Glass-Steagall Act. These are smart financial reforms designed to protect our economy from another financial crisis and hardworking American taxpayers from another Wall Street collapse. We know that the climate of deregulation led to the financial crisis. We can’t let that happen again,” said Congressman Tim Ryan (OH-13).

Background: In 1933, the Banking Act—also known as the Glass-Steagall Act—passed amid an atmosphere of chaos and uncertainty to address banking failures of the Great Depression. The goal of its lead cosponsors, Rep. Henry Steagall and Sen. Carter Glass, was to separate commercial and investment banking and restore confidence in the American banking system.

In 1999, Congress repealed the Glass-Steagall Act and removed the barriers between investment banking and traditional depository banks. This action gave financial institutions and investment firms access to the deposits of the American consumer, which then were used to gamble on the Wall Street casino. This misguided deregulation allowed the creation of giant financial supermarkets—that could own investment banks, commercial banks, and insurance firms—and created companies too big and intertwined to fail. This lack of regulation also allowed Wall Street to leverage their debt past sustainable ratios using consumer mutual funds and the pension accounts of American workers as collateral.

Hawaii Homeless Initiative Would Serve 2200 Households

With a proven track record the coordinated statewide homeless initiative has already provided over an eight-month period, financial assistance to 1,279 households, thereby assisting 3,992 adults and children who were homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.

Senator Josh Green provides “Homelessness is Hawaii’s most pressing crisis today and requires a comprehensive, all hands on deck solution, so that we can help our most vulnerable citizens. We need new ideas and the right amount of resources to improve matters immediately.”

“Through the Coordinated Statewide Homeless Initiative, we have helped over 4,300 individuals – 2,306 adults and 2,012 children – all of whom were homeless or at-risk for becoming homeless” said Norm Baker, COO of Aloha United Way. “For every homeless individual we rapidly rehoused, we helped three others who were on the verge of becoming homeless. Homeless prevention assistance is a critically important strategy to finding sustainable solutions while simultaneously assisting those who are currently homeless.”

Vice Speaker Mizuno adds “There is a myriad of reasons why an individual or family enter into homelessness so there needs to be a myriad of approaches to address homelessness. The coordinated statewide homeless initiative has a proven record of cost-effective prevention and rapid rehousing services that need to continue so that more families do not fall into homelessness.”

Hilo Casting Call for Extras in Major Movie

EXTRAS NEEDED! This Sunday – February 5 – 6:30am – 11:00am in HILO.

This is your last chance to be in this movie which is completely shot on Hawai’i Island!

RSVP to konasnowpictures@gmail.com

Department of Health Cites Island Recycling, Inc. for Water Pollution Violations at Kapolei and Dillingham Facilities

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against Island Recycling, Inc. at both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities located at 91-140 Kaomi Loop in Kapolei and 1803 Dillingham Blvd in Honolulu respectively.

The company has been cited for failing to comply with Hawaii’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for industrial storm water discharges. DOH has ordered Island Recycling to pay a penalty of $25,400, clean the affected drainage ditch on its property in Kapolei, and take corrective actions at both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities to prevent the facilities’ from discharging polluted storm water to nearby storm drains and state waters. The company may contest the order and request a hearing within 20 days.

Island Recycling has NPDES permit coverage for both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities under Hawaii’s General Permit authorizing discharges of industrial storm water. However, during inspections performed in June 2014 and subsequent file reviews, DOH found the facilities were not implementing controls to properly prevent polluted storm water discharges. The company had also placed discarded materials and equipment in a drainage ditch that is recognized as a state water body and protected by state and federal regulations. In addition to inadequate storm water controls at the facilities, Island Recycling also failed to submit Discharge Monitoring Reports required by the NPDES General Permit that are vital to determining the safety and quality of the facilities’ storm water discharges.

The Clean Water Act prohibits discharging pollutants through a point source into state waters unless it is allowed by an NPDES permit. The permit contains limits on what can be safely discharged, monitoring and reporting requirements, and other provisions to ensure that the discharge does not hurt water quality or people’s health. The permit translates general requirements of the Clean Water Act into specific provisions tailored to the operations of facilities discharging pollutants. For information on the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System go to www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-permit-basics.

The DOH Clean Water Branch regulates, permits, and inspects a variety of industrial facilities ranging from construction sites to landfills and recycling facilities to ensure that these facilities do not pollute Hawaii’s waters especially during rainfall and storm conditions. The Clean Water Branch protects and promotes the health of Hawaii’s residents, visitors, and environment through regulation of high-risk water pollution sources, and education of industrial sectors and the general public. More information about the DOH Clean Water Branch and access to water quality data and files for NPDES permitted facilities is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/cwb/.

Hawaii Representative Wants to Switch Political Parties Because of Presidents Treatment of Women and Minorities

Rep. Beth Fukumoto

In the last couple years, I’ve watched leaders in the Republican Party become less and less tolerant of diverse opinions and dissenting voices. I am under constant scrutiny for working across the aisle to pass common sense legislation that will benefit my district and the people of Hawaii.

Today, I’m facing demands for my resignation from leadership and possible censure because I raised concerns about our President’s treatment of women and minorities. I’ve been asked by both my party and my caucus to commit to not criticizing the President for the remainder of his term and to take a more partisan approach to working in the Legislature. That is not a commitment I can make. As a representative of my community, it is my job to hold leaders accountable and to work with anyone, regardless of party, to make Hawaii a better place for our families.

This morning, I sent a letter to my district explaining that I would like to leave the Republican Party and seek membership in the Democratic Party. When I was re-elected in November, I was elected as a Republican, and I want to honor my community’s choice by consulting them before any decision is made. As I articulated in my letter, I encourage my constituents to contact me with input and provide feedback. I was elected by the people of Mililani, and I am here to represent them.

Rep. Beth Fukumoto

Senate Launches Hawaiian Language Hearing Notice Pilot Project

The Hawai‘i State Senate this week will begin posting the hearing notices for two standing committees in both the English and Hawaiian language as part of the Senate’s continuing initiative recognizing the state’s official languages.

The Senate Committee on Water and Land (WTL), chaired by Senator Karl Rhoads (Dist.13 – Dowsett Highlands, Pu‘unui, Nu‘uanu, Pacific Heights, Pauoa, Punchbowl, Palama, Liliha, Iwilei, Chinatown, and Downtown) and the Committee on Hawaiian Affairs (HWN), chaired by Senator Maile Shimabukuro (Dist. 21 – Kalaeloa, Honokai Hale, Ko ‘Olina, Nanakuli, Ma‘ili, Wai‘anae, Makaha, Makua) are the piloting the initiative to have the hearing notices posted in both languages.

“Through our legislative materials, this project reflects the responsibility and role of the Senate in showing respect for our host culture,” said Senate President Ronald D. Kouchi. “It makes sense these two important committees would be the first to expand on our Hawaiian language initiative.”

The Senate Order of the Day has been posted in dual languages along with the usage of Hawaiian diacritical markings in its public records since the Senate initiative on Hawaiian language was instituted in 2015.

“Government operations were conducted in the Hawaiian language up to the 1920’s so we have an entire lexicon that is the basis for all of our laws today,” said Senate Majority Leader J. Kalani English. “This initiative proudly reflects the language revitalization in Hawai‘i.”

To view all current committee hearing notices in the 2017 Legislative Session , visit www.capitol.hawaii.gov.

Lion Dance Performance at HCFCU’s Kaloko Facility

In celebration of the Chinese New Year and of Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union’s (HCFCU) 80th anniversary, as well as the 12th anniversary of its Kaloko facility, the Hawaii Lion Dance Association from Honolulu, under the direction of Senior Instructors Kelfred Chang and Elaine Jay, will present a unique performance on Saturday, February 4, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m at HCFCU’s Kaloko facility (73-5611 Olowalu Street, Kailua-Kona, HI) in the John Y. Iwane Credit Union Center.

This event, which is free and open to the public, will feature a special blessing of HCFCU’s Kaloko facility, Lion Dance performances, and an educational presentation on the meaning and significance of the Lion Dance.  There will also be a rare opportunity to meet and greet the performers as well as to take photos as guests “feed” the lion.

“We’re so glad we can say gung hei fat choy to the community at this special event,” said Tricia Buskirk, President and CEO of HCFCU. “It’s an honor for us to have the Hawaii Lion Dance Association bless this wonderful facility and share with us the influence of Chinese culture on Hawaii life.”

For additional information, contact HCFCU at 808-930-7700 or marketing@hicommfcu.com.

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit credit union owned by its over 40,000 member/owners with branches in Honokaa, Kailua-Kona, Kaloko, Kealakekua and Kohala.  In addition to complete checking and savings services, the credit union offers credit cards, auto, mortgage, construction, small business, educational and personal loans; online and mobile banking; investment services; youth programs and supports numerous Hawaii Island programs and events.  Membership in Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is open to all Hawaii Island residents. For more information visit www.hicommfcu.com.

Big Island Police Initiate First-Degree Terroristic Threatening Case at Honoka’a High and Intermediate

Hawaiʻi Island police have initiated a first-degree terroristic threatening case in connection with a threat to Honokaʻa High and Intermediate School on Wednesday morning.

No students were injured.

In response to a 10:48 a.m. call, Hāmākua officers learned that a threatening message had been left on a voice mail message earlier in the morning.

Out of concern for the safety of the students, school officials evacuated Honokaʻa High and Intermediate School and Honokaʻa Elementary School as a precaution. The students were taken to the Honokaʻa sports complex, where parents and school buses were able to retrieve them.

Police officers and school personnel checked every classroom and building but found no suspicious items. The investigation is continuing.

Police ask anyone with any information about this case to call Officer Blake Ragocos at 775-7533 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Officer Jeremiah Hull “Officer of the Month” for February

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Kona Patrol Officer Jeremiah Hull as “Officer of the Month” for February in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (February 1) at Huggo’s restaurant in Kailua-Kona.

Police Officer Jeremiah Hull

Hull was honored for his work on the Area II Special Enforcement Unit, which was formed to address crime trends in Kona, such as burglaries, robberies, thefts, auto thefts and auto break-ins.

In one case, Hull observed a woman in a suspicious vehicle concealing and then attempting to destroy a methamphetamine smoking pipe when officers approached her. This observation led to the recovery of more than a pound of processed marijuana from the vehicle and, ultimately, to numerous felony drug charges.

In another case, Hull’s observations resulted in the recovery of nearly an ounce of methamphetamine from a suspected narcotics distributor.

In nomination papers, Sergeant Zachary Houchin praised Hull’s “focus, determination, attention to detail, and dedication.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Hull is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee is an organization that encourages community involvement in aiding and supporting police in West Hawaiʻi.