Coast Guard and Fire Department Searching for Possible Missing Fisherman Near Hilo Break Wall

The Coast Guard and Hawaii County Fire Department are searching for a possible missing fisherman near the break wall in Hilo on the Big Island, Wednesday.

Coast Guard aircrews from Air Station Barbers Point aboard an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter and an HC-130 Hercules airplane have been launched in addition to the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349). The fire department has ground crews searching the shore and expect to launch a boat crew and helicopter at first light.

Watchstanders and Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received notification just before 5 a.m. from Hawaii County Fire Department of a possible person in the water off the Hilo break wall.

The Coast Guard has issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast requesting the assistance of mariners in the area to keep a sharp look out and report any sightings to command center watchstanders at 808-842-2600.

Weather conditions in the area are forecast as winds 17 mph with wind waves at 4 feet and swell to 9 feet. There is a slight chance of showers in the morning. A high surf advisory is in effect for east facing shores of all main Hawaiian Islands.

Security Zone Set Up in Kailua in Anticipation of President Obama’s Annual Vacation

Coast Guard personnel, federal, state and local law enforcement partners will enforce a temporary security zone in waters of Kailua Bay, Oahu, Hawaii beginning Friday, Dec. 16 and running through Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017.

The temporary security zone is necessary to ensure the safety of a distinguished visitor.

The security zone will be in effect from 8 a.m. HST on Dec. 16, 2016 to 4 p.m. HST on Jan. 2, 2017, unless canceled earlier by the Captain of the Port.

The Coast Guard is coordinating with the Honolulu Police Department, Marine Corps Base Hawaii and other federal, state, and county law enforcement agencies to conduct patrols of the area under the direction of the U.S. Secret Service.

The Coast Guard has established a temporary security zone on the waters of Kailua Bay off the eastern coast of Oahu. The security zone includes all waters in Kailua Bay to the west of a line connecting two points beginning at the shoreline of Kapoho Point and thence westward at a bearing of 227 degrees true to the shoreline at the southeastern corner of Kailuana Loop in Kailua. In addition, the security zone includes the adjacent channel beginning at Kapoho Point to a point along the channel ending at the North Kalaheo Avenue Road Bridge. An orange marker will be placed in the canal to indicate the perimeter of the security zone.

Under U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, 33 CFR 165.33 prohibits any unauthorized person or vessel from entering or remaining in this security zone. Any person entering the security zone without the permission of the Captain of the Port is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $88,613 for each violation or a criminal penalty resulting in imprisonment of not more than 25 years and a fine of not more than $250,000. Offending vessels may also be seized and held liable for any monetary assessments.

Notice of Upcoming Security Zone Enforcement Honolulu International Airport

The Coast Guard is enforcing security zones around all waters surrounding the Honolulu International Airport, north and south of the southern coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

These security zones will be in effect from 6 p.m. HST on Dec. 16, to 2 a.m. HST on Dec. 17, unless canceled earlier by the Captain of the Port.

These security zones extend from the surface of the water to the ocean floor. These security zones may not be entered without the prior permission from the U.S. Coast Guard Captain of the Port of Honolulu. Entry into the zones is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the Port of Honolulu.

Under U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, 33 CFR 165.33 prohibits any unauthorized person or vessel from entering or remaining in a security zone. Any person entering the security zone without the permission of the Captain of the Port Honolulu is subject to a penalty of not more than $88,613 for each violation or a criminal penalty resulting in imprisonment of not more than 25 years and a fine of not more than $250,000. Offending vessels may also be seized and held liable for any monetary assessments.

Hawaii Special Olympics Athletes Benefit From Hawaiian Electric Donation

As one of the company’s “125 Acts of Aloha” commemorating its 125th anniversary, Hawaiian Electric has donated $10,000 to Special Olympics Hawaii, the nonprofit organization that provides year-round sports training and athletic competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Tayne Sekimura, Hawaiian Electric senior vice president/chief financial officer, presented the check to the organization during a Special Olympics Young Athlete event at Kaiser High School.

“Every person should have the opportunity to learn, enjoy, and benefit from participation in individual and team sports,” said Sekimura, an avid runner who recently joined the Special Olympics Hawaii board in April.

“The Special Olympics program was founded on a firm belief that there are no limits to the capabilities of people with intellectual challenges. They can participate in a wide variety of recreational experiences and benefit from it as well. Our company applauds the organization in Hawaii for providing these athletes with the proper training and skills to grow their confidence, and ultimately, to shine.”

“We are extremely grateful to be one of Hawaiian Electric’s 125 Acts of Aloha for their 125th anniversary celebration” said Nancy Bottelo, Special Olympics Hawaii president and CEO. “It is through the generosity of corporations like Hawaiian Electric that we are able to continue to transform the lives of children and adults with intellectual disabilities and their families.”

“No More Cancer” Coalition Launches New State Plan to Defeat Cancer Disparities in Hawaii

The Hawaii Comprehensive Cancer Coalition unveiled the Hawaii State Cancer Plan, 2016-2020 today at their summit at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki.  The Plan is a vision and action document designed to reduce the burden of cancer in our State. Men and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI) are more likely to die from the disease than women and other ethnicities, suggesting that these groups are less likely to regularly be screened.

Click to view the Hawai’i State Cancer Plan

“The new State Plan illustrates that we have made great strides in cancer prevention and treatment, yet it is a burden still felt in our daily lives. Each of us has a family member or loved one who has been affected,” said Director of Health Virginia Pressler. “Improving screening and treatment is necessary to address the disparities that exist with men and minority populations.” Cancer remains the second leading cause of death in Hawaii.

The Hawaii State Cancer Plan is based on national recommendations and was developed by key stakeholders from across the State. It organizes priority objectives under four major goals: Prevention, Early Detection, Equitable Access to Care, and Quality of Life.

Men in Hawaii are 1.5 times more likely to die from cancer than women, due in part to lower screening rates. Between 2000 and 2014, men had 3,481 more cancer deaths than women. While screening rates have improved over the last decade for both sexes, men are less likely to survive diagnosis, suggesting that they were not diagnosed and an early enough state to prevent death. In 2014, 9,200 more women than men were diagnosed with some type of cancer in Hawaii.

In terms of ethnicity, NHOPI are three times more likely to die from cancer compared to other ethnicities. This may be explained by lower screening rates, with NHOPI having rates 14 percent lower than Caucasians.

To address these disparities, the Plan includes strategies for prevention and early detection, such as improving colorectal screening among men by offering it in combination with other screenings, increasing cultural sensitivity among medical staff, and linking patient navigators to healthcare systems.

For both sexes, lung and bronchus cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death, and is responsible for more than one in every five cancer deaths in Hawaii. Colorectal cancer is the second and third leading cause of death for men and women, respectively, with one in ten men and nearly one in ten women dying from the disease annually.

“Though deaths resulting from cancer are decreasing over time, it remains the fact that one in five deaths from all cancers are potentially avoidable,” said Cancer Coalition Chair Dr. Shane Morita. “The Hawaii State Cancer Plan gives us a roadmap to tackle these disparities, claim our victory over cancer, and ultimately save lives.”

To view the full State Cancer Plan, please visit: http://health.hawaii.gov/cancer.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park’s January 2017 Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017.

January is Volcano Awareness Month, and all ADIP programs will be presented by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

34 Years and Counting: Updates on Kīlauea Volcano’s Eruptions. As of Jan. 3, 2017, Kīlauea has been erupting nearly continuously for the past 34 years. It began on the volcano’s East Rift Zone, where Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō continues to send lava flows down the flanks of Kīlauea. In 2008, a second vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea, where a spattering lava lake still lights the night sky and captivates spectators.  Tina Neal, Scientist-in-Charge of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, briefly describes the history of these two eruptions and provides in-depth accounts of volcanic activity during the past year, including lava reaching the sea for the first time since 2013 and the rise and fall of the summit lava lake. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Jan. 3 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

The Unheard Sounds of Hawaiian Volcanoes. Infrasound is atmospheric sound and vibration below the threshold of human hearing. These low-frequency sounds are generated by large-scale fluid flow and can propagate for thousands of kilometers to provide early warning of natural or man-made hazards. Active open-vent volcanoes, such as Kīlauea, are exceptionally good sound emitters, and scientists are steadily building a continuous baseline of volcano-acoustic activity, including infrasonic tremor from Halemaʻumaʻu and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.  Join Milton Garces, Director of the University of Hawaiʻi Infrasound Laboratory, as he talks about “listening” to Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, and Hualālai volcanoes through one of the most advanced infrasound networks in the world. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Jan. 10 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

‘Ukulele Making Demonstration. Join Oral Abihai as he shares his passion for making ‘ukulele from local and exotic woods. A native Hawaiian, Oral has been building ‘ukulele for 10 years, following his apprenticeship in Lāhaina, Maui with master builder Kenny Potts. Oral loves to create ‘ukulele in his spare time with bits and pieces of his wood collection. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Jan. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Trials and Tribulations of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater: 200 Years Old and Still Going. Halema‘uma‘u, the large crater within Kīlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, has a checkered past and an uncertain future. Probably first appearing in the early 19th century, Halemaʻumaʻu has enthralled visitors with its lava lakes, enticed at least three people to their deaths in past decades, and served as a centerpiece for countless photographs and paintings.

Lava lake and flows on Halema‘uma‘u Crater floor in 1968. USGS photo

Don Swanson, a USGS geologist at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, traces the volcanic history of Halemaʻumaʻu and includes personal anecdotes about his encounters with the crater during the 1967-68 eruption. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Jan. 17 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hula Performance by Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mamo. Be immersed in authentic Hawaiian hula presented by Kumu Hula Pelehonuamea and Kumu Hula Kekoa Harman. Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mamo is composed of the students of the Hawaiian language immersion school, Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u. These students are all fluent speakers of the Hawaiian language, which is being revived after many years of decline. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

  • When: Wed., Jan. 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

How Do HVO Geologists Track Lava Flows and Lava Lakes? Kīlauea is currently home to two remarkably long eruptions. Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and other vents on the volcano’s East Rift Zone have erupted lava flows for more than three decades. At the summit of Kīlauea, an active vent within Halema‘uma‘u Crater has fed a lava lake for over eight years.  Monitoring each of these eruptions presents unique challenges and requires using various tools and techniques, ranging from low-tech to state-of-the-art. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick explains the toolkit he uses to map lava flows and measure lava lakes, and describes how scientists continuously improve their methods of tracking volcanic activity. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Jan. 24 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ho‘okani ‘Ukulele (Learn to Play ‘Ukulele). Learn the basics of the beloved Hawaiian ‘ukulele. The modern ‘ukulele evolved from the Machete de Braga, a small stringed instrument introduced by Portuguese immigrants in the 1800s. The ‘ukulele is now an iconic part of Hawaiian music culture. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Jan. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

An Update on Mauna Loa Activity and Monitoring Efforts. Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth, has erupted 33 times since 1843, most recently in 1984, when lava flows approached Hilo. Future eruptions could produce high-volume, fast-moving flows that reach the ocean in a matter of hours. In 2015, the Volcano Alert Level of Mauna Loa was elevated from “NORMAL” to “ADVISORY” due to increased seismicity and deformation at the volcano, which continue to occur. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Ingrid Johanson provides a brief account of Mauna Loa’s eruptive history, an update on its current status, and an overview of how HVO scientists track activity that might presage the volcano’s next eruption. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Jan. 31 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium