Governor’s Statement on Death of Schofield Soldier

governor-ige-profileOur state and our nation mourn the death of a valuable member of Hawai‘i’s 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks. On behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I extend my deepest condolences to the soldier’s family, those who served alongside that soldier and the leadership of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team. Please join me in honoring this soldier’s service and contributions to our community and our country.

— Governor David Ige

Native Plant Enthusiasts Invited to Annual Oahu Arbor Day Plant Sale Tomorrow

The public is invited to the annual Arbor Day plant sale on Friday, November 4 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon at the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife O‘ahu plant nursery at 2135 Makiki Heights Dr., in Honolulu.

hayden-arbor-dayNative plant fans can find 4 in. – 1 gallon standard pot sized white hibiscus, ‘a‘ali‘i, red ‘ohi‘a, ukiuki, native grasses and sedges, as well as red ti.

Some of the plants available are larger (3 ft. – 5 ft.) yellow ‘ohi‘a, koa, koaia (dryland koa), and hibiscus clayi. Cash or checks are accepted, no credit cards.

People are advised to park along the lower roadway and parking area since parking at the forestry office and nursery is tight.  For more information call 973-9778.

Campaign Hawaii: New Book Offers an Inside Look at Island Politics

On the eve of 2016’s hotly contested state and national elections, Watermark Publishing of Honolulu announces the release of Campaign Hawai‘i: An Inside Look at Politics in Paradise by political veteran Rick Tsujimura.

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For more than a half-century, Tsujimura has been one of the true believers who work behind the scenes to get out the vote—the campaign staff and volunteers who canvass neighborhoods and stuff envelopes and hold signs at the side of the road, tirelessly supporting their candidates during election season. In Campaign Hawai‘i, Tsujimura shares stories of life on the campaign trail—the backroom strategizing, ethnic voting and mud-slinging, the exhilaration of victory and the disappointment of defeat on election night.

It’s an inside view sharpened by Tsujimura’s long years spent toiling in the trenches for Jack Burns, George Ariyoshi, John Craven and Ben Cayetano, and running campaigns for Eileen Anderson, Arnold Morgado, Jeremy Harris, Randy Iwase, Neil Abercrombie and Kirk Caldwell.

“I hope these stories bring some life to events that voters may have heard about, but whose details have faded with time,” the author says. “This book is not so much a historical account of events, but a record of the lessons learned during my years of exposure to the political process in Hawai‘i.”

Campaign Hawai‘i is a primer for campaign workers and candidates alike, and a great read for anyone who follows politics, Hawaiian-style. “With equal measures of intelligence and humility, Tsujimura explicates both victories and defeats. Students of politics, take out your notebooks and sharpen your pencils,” advises Dan Boylan, Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Hawai‘i − West O‘ahu.

Rick Tsujimura earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science from the University of Hawai‘i and a Juris Doctor from the Loyola Law School. He is of counsel to the law firm Ashford & Wriston and serves on the boards of the Queens Health Systems, the East-West Center and Global Hope Networks International in Geneva, Switzerland.

Campaign Hawai‘i: An Inside Look at Politics in Paradise (ISBN-13 978-1-935690-82-5) is available in softcover for $17.95 at bookstores and other retail outlets and from online booksellers, or direct from the publisher at www.bookshawaii.net.  Contact Watermark Publishing, 1000 Bishop St., Suite 806, Honolulu, HI 96813; telephone 1-808-587-7766; toll-free 1-866- 900-BOOK; fax 1-808-521-3461; e-mail sales@bookshawaii.net.

10-Year-Old Girl Dies After Being Hit By Car in South Kona

A-10-year old Hōnaunau girl died from a vehicle-pedestrian crash Wednesday afternoon (November 2) in South Kona near the 106-mile marker of the Māmālahoa Highway (Route 11).

hpd-badgeShe has been identified as Janexty Kaaloa.

Responding to a 1:10 p.m. call, police determined that a tan 1987 Jeep pickup truck had been traveling south on Māmālahoa Highway when it struck Kaaloa who had been running westbound across the highway. Kaaloa sustained critical injuries from the collision. She was taken to Kona community Hospital, where she was pronounced dead at 2:33 p.m.

The operator of the vehicle, 61-year-old William Herndon of Captain Cook, was arrested on suspicion of negligent homicide and later released pending further investigation.

It is not immediately known if speed was a factor in the crash.

Traffic Enforcement Unit officers have initiated a negligent homicide investigation and have ordered an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask anyone who witnessed the crash to call Officer Justin Hooser at 326-4646, Ext. 229. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo.

This is the 26th traffic fatality this year compared with 16 at this time last year.

Temple Children Completes Six Murals in Downtown Hilo

Seven renowned artists recently completed six large-scale, sustainability and Hawai‘i Island-themed murals throughout Downtown Hilo. Artists painted – through rain and shine – October 17-24, 2016.

The murals were driven by Temple Children, a local arts and sustainability organization that coordinates projects to strengthen communities, promote social and environmental innovation, and incite positive global change.

The October mural series is the third public art activation by Temple Children aimed at beautifying and revitalizing the Downtown Hilo community.

During the visiting artists’ stay, all were immersed in Hawai‘i Island culture, educated on local food sustainability, and fed nearly 100 percent locally-sourced on-island fare. In addition to painting, artists participated in a lo‘i restoration workday in Waipi‘o Valley organized by local non-profit Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. Kilauea EcoGuides led an educational hike to the lava flow prior to artists’ departure.

Completed murals may be viewed at:

Hilo Backpacker’s Hostel on Waianuenue Ave //
Artists: Rick Hayward and Emily Devers @frankandmimi (Brisbane, Australia)

Frank and Mimi’s mural is inspired by hands-on immersion in Waipiʻo Valley, where they worked collectively with the Temple Children crew to restore a loʻi for non-profit, Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. As a duo, they explore sustainable food production methods and use their artwork to stimulate necessary discussion about the future of food. Frank and Mimi believe it is our responsibility to regenerate what we take, allowing the earth to heal from human touch. Their Hilo mural celebrates the indigenous papaya, taro and ʻolena, with the phrase ‘Land of Plenty’ layered over imagery of the powerful Hawai‘i Island foods. The text is illustrated using topographic line work directly referencing Mauna Kea, framing negative space in which sustainable food production conversations can continue.

Agasa Furniture Store on Ponahawai St //
Artist: Yoskay Yamamoto @yoskayyamamoto (Toba, Japan)

Yosaky’s piece draws inspiration from the vast skies and oceans of Hawai‘i. His on-island experience with Temple Children has provided him with the opportunity to deepen his connect with Mother Earth.

Yosaky’s piece draws inspiration from the vast skies and oceans of Hawai‘i. His on-island experience with Temple Children has provided him with the opportunity to deepen his connect with Mother Earth.

Downtown KTA Super Stores on Keawe St //
Artist: Kai Kaulukukui @artworkofkai (Puna, Hawai‘i)

Kai’s two murals– focused on food sustainability and utilizing locally grown produce to feed our ‘ohana–are located at the iconic Downtown Hilo KTA market. The two panels directly next to Kai’s were painted murals by local artist Kathleen Kam, and are also about food sustainability. Kai felt a responsibility to the existing art to continue the story. While Kathleen painted the farming and harvesting aspect, Kai concentrated on preparation and consumption. One mural depicts a lu’au set in the past to show the similarities of how we dine together now. The second mural is a collage of fresh and healthy harvested foods.

Former Ebesugawa Flower Shop on Furneaux Ln //
Artist: Jet Martinez @jetmar1 (Oakland, California)

Jet’s mural is a celebration of the Ebesugawa sisters’ lifetime of work with flowers in Downtown Hilo. It was a great coincidence for Jet that the site of his mural was formerly a flower shop as his subject specialty is flowers. In Jet’s research of the Ebesugawa family, he found repeated references of the sisters often talked about serving their clients with kindness and openness, which really resonated with him. The mural features a Hilo-inspired floral arrangement, creating a bright, uplifting, and harmonious space.

Jet’s mural is a celebration of the Ebesugawa sisters’ lifetime of work with flowers in Downtown Hilo. It was a great coincidence for Jet that the site of his mural was formerly a flower shop as his subject specialty is flowers. In Jet’s research of the Ebesugawa family, he found repeated references of the sisters often talked about serving their clients with kindness and openness, which really resonated with him. The mural features a Hilo-inspired floral arrangement, creating a bright, uplifting, and harmonious space.

Hana Hou Hilo on Bayfront //
Artist: Brandy Serikaku @b_alia (Hilo, Hawai‘i)

Brandy’s piece honors the famous rain of Hilo, Ka Ua Kanilehua. The name speaks about the sound it makes when it rains on the ʻōhiʻa lehua tree. The artist worries about losing lehua trees to rapid ʻōhiʻa death and never hearing this special rain again. To the artist, growing up in Hilo, the rain is everything. She calls the rain a source of inspiration, life and the only way one can enjoy rainbows. Brandy wanted to honor the town and hālau she grew up in, by honoring the one thing Hilo is famous for since our kūpuna, Ka Ua Kanilehua.

Brandy’s piece honors the famous rain of Hilo, Ka Ua Kanilehua. The name speaks about the sound it makes when it rains on the ʻōhiʻa lehua tree. The artist worries about losing lehua trees to rapid ʻōhiʻa death and never hearing this special rain again. To the artist, growing up in Hilo, the rain is everything. She calls the rain a source of inspiration, life and the only way one can enjoy rainbows. Brandy wanted to honor the town and hālau she grew up in, by honoring the one thing Hilo is famous for since our kūpuna, Ka Ua Kanilehua.

Nikisa Properties Building on Ponahawai + Kinoole //
Artist: Sam Yong @saminthewolf (Auckland, New Zealand)

Sam’s piece depicts an ‘io, endemic to Hawai‘i Island and a symbol of Hawaiian royalty. The bird’s history teaches the community to look at life from a different perspective, to love nature, and take care of the land.

Sam’s piece depicts an ‘io, endemic to Hawai‘i Island and a symbol of Hawaiian royalty. The bird’s history teaches the community to look at life from a different perspective, to love nature, and take care of the land.

The public art and sustainability project was made possible with financial support from Novo Painting (Cole and Lisa Palea), OluKai, K. Taniguchi, Ltd., Hana Hou Hilo, Agasa Furniture Store and Keaukaha One Youth Development.

HPM Building Supply donated Pratt & Lambert paint; ladders and lifts supplied by Takamine Construction; and artist meals donated by Sweet Cane Café, Aloha Mondays and Loved by the Sun. Additional local donations were provided by Aiona Car Sales, Two Ladies Kitchen, Moon and Turtle, Big Island Booch, OK Farms, The Locavore Store, Island Naturals, Shark’s Coffee and MaruMaru Hawaii. Onsite support and keiki volunteers provided by Circle of Life Hilo’s Leandra Keuma and local artist Kathleen Kam.

The October project was led by Temple Children founders, Miya Tsukazaki and David “MEGGS” Hooke, and Regional Director Ashley Kierkiewicz. It was documented by Cory S. Martin, a freelance cinematographer, director and editor based in Buffalo, New York.

Annual Arbor Day Plant Sale this Friday on Kauai at Pua Loke Nursery

Common and rare native plants of Hawai‘i will be available for purchase from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, November 4, at the Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) Pua Loke Nursery, 4398-D Pua Loke St., Lihu‘e, (in the parking lot behind the Dept. of Agriculture. This annual plant sale in celebration of Hawai‘i’s Arbor Day marks 48 years since the first DOFAW plant sale was held in 1968.

hayden-arbor-dayLocal floral enthusiasts and rare plant collectors look forward to the annual event, especially since DOFAW began offering federally listed threatened and endangered plants, native to Hawai‘i and used for the state’s conservation programs.

This year’s anniversary sale will feature the delicate red flowered koki‘o ‘ula (Hibiscus clayi) historically found in east facing dry forests of Nounou and Anahola mountains.  This rare hibiscus is endemic to Kaua‘i only, meaning it is found nowhere else in the world, and will bear a numbered tag for authenticity.

Other rare plant offerings will include the native white hibiscus from Kaua‘i’s north shore, Hibiscus waimeae variety hanarae and the miniature green flowered Hibiscadelphus distans also known as hau kuahiwi.

Arbor Day sale attendees will also find an assortment of common native plants available for sale including wili wili, a lowland, dry forest tree commonly found on the leeward sides of the island with reddish-orange seeds that were traditionally strung into handsome lei; kou, another lowland tree that prefers sunny, warm coastal areas and the versatile ‘a‘ali‘i which can be found growing from mauka to makai.  Other native plants available for sale are ‘akia, kulu‘i, maile, ma‘o, naupaka and pohinahina.

In addition to encouraging the use of native plants in home landscaping, DOFAW will offer for sale, puakenikeni (Fagraea berteroana), a non-invasive exotic ornamental tree cherished for its fragrant flowers used in lei making.

This is a great opportunity to support DOFAW’s programs on Kaua‘i and bring home plants to cultivate your native garden.

For more information, please call our DOFAW nursery at 241-3762.

Big Island Native Plant Enthusiasts Invited to Annual Arbor Day Plant Sale

The public is invited to an Arbor Day plant sale on Friday, November 4 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife Kamuela State Tree Nursery, located at 66-1220-A Lalamilo Rd. in Kamuela.

hayden-arbor-dayThe sale features both native and non-native trees and shrub seedlings, with prices ranging from $1 to $13 depending on pot size.  As always sales are cash only and plants are available on a first come first served basis.

Sale items will mostly feature native plants such as koa, native hibiscus species, sandalwood, cypress and pines. Dibble tube seedlings will start at $1 each, and bigger trees in pots are also available. A two-gallon pot will run up to $11.

For more information call the nursery at (808) 887-6061.