Hurricane Madeline 11:00 PM Update From Hawaii

At 1100 PM HST (0900 UTC), the center of Hurricane Madeline was located near latitude 19.1 North, longitude 147.2 West.

madeline9

Madeline is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 km/h) and this motion is expected to become west southwesterly late Tuesday through late Wednesday. On the forecast track, the center of Madeline will pass dangerously close to the Big Island Wednesday and Wednesday night.

Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph (215 km/h) with higher gusts.  Madeline is a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.  Some weakening is forecast through late Wednesday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles (45 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 950 mb (28.06 inches).

Hurricane Madeline Update

At 500 PM HST (0300 UTC), the center of Hurricane Madeline was located near latitude 18.9 North, longitude 146.3 West. Madeline is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 km/h).

madeline8A gradual turn toward the west is expected by Tuesday, with Madeline expected to move west-southwest Tuesday night into Wednesday. Little change in forward speed is expected the next couple of days. On the forecast track, the center of Madeline will pass dangerously close to the Big Island Wednesday and Wednesday night.

Maximum sustained winds are near 125 mph (205 km/h) with higher gusts. Madeline is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is expected tonight, with gradual weakening forecast Tuesday and Wednesday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles (45 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 955 mb (28.20 inches).

Pearl Harbor Restaurant Using Celebrity Chef Sam Choy’s Name Without Permission

A restaurant located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam is not what many folks may think it actually is and certainly isn’t what the United States Navy may have thought what they were getting when they allowed the restaurant to open up on the military base.

Island Grille2

Image from the Island Grille website

Sam Choy’s Island Style Seafood Grille” located on the base at 3465 Malama Bay Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii IS NOT AFFILIATED with the Celebrity Chef Sam Choy that we have all come to know and love here in Hawaii.

I asked the owner to respond to an email about the ownership of the restaurant… however, after 4 days he has not responded to my email.

Image from Island Grille website

Image from Island Grille website

After speaking with those associated with the “Real” Sam Choy, I learned that the restaurant is not even serving the same recipes; Sam does not cook there, and hasn’t ever even been compensated for his namesake on the restaurant.

Sam Choy stated:

“The Hickam / Pearl Harbor Restaurant was opened using my name.  To this day I have never seen a penny of royalty or any payment of any sort going towards using my name.  I just want the community to be aware of this fact.”

According to an August 19th Facebook post the Island Style Grille is accepting applications using Sam Choy’s name as a hiring point:

“Sam Choy’s Seafood Grille is hiring! Located conveniently on JBPHH right next to Hickam beach! Positions available for all back of house kitchen staff including Line Cooks as well as all front of house including Bartenders and Servers. Experience required for line cook, bartending and serving. Please inquire and/or apply in person or contact us with any questions!!!!!”

I have learned that Choy and his team have retained an attorney and are looking to get his name removed from the restaurant… so until then… just know that this restaurant is not affiliated with the “Real Sam Choy”.

Real Sam Choy

Click to see the REAL Sam Choy!

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 42-Year-Old Ka’u Woman

UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 42-year-old Ananda S. Chang, who was reported missing.

She was located in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates on Tuesday morning (August 30).

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 42-year-old Kaʻū woman who was reported missing.

Ananda Chang

Ananda Chang

Ananda S. Chang was last seen in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates on Thursday (August 25) in a red Chevrolet Cavalier four-door sedan.

She is described as Caucasian, 5-foot-5, 150 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or Officer Henry Ivy at 939-2520.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hokulea Begins Travel to North American Great Lakes Using Complex Waterway Lock System

Precision, timing and patience: these meticulous elements are crucial to the success of Hokulea’s most current leg of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, as the canoe and her crew are set to encounter lock after lock on their first-time sail to the Great Lakes of North America. A lock is a complex waterway system used for raising and lowering watercraft between bodies of water of different levels on rivers and waterways.

locks4The traditional voyaging canoe from Hawaii left Waterford, New York early this morning and docked at Riverlink Marina in Amsterdam, New York at around 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Crew members are now prepped to sail the Erie Canal locks and bridges, taking the Oswego detour to pass through 30 locks to reach Lake Ontario.

locksThe canoe first encountered the waterway lock system in March this year during her Florida sail. However, this current series of locks is the most extensive lock system that the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage has experienced, and the crew will take this time to learn the more intricate details about the physics of the lock system. On this leg of the voyage, the canoe has been elevated by the waterway locks by a collective total of 250 feet.

locks2The Hokulea crew plans to re-start sailing tomorrow morning at 7:30 a.m. ET. After completing the first ten 10 locks today, they are aiming to complete Locks 11-18, with Lock 17 having the highest water lift of 40 feet.

locks3This current leg will bring Hokulea the furthest north that she will travel on the Worldwide Voyage.

61-Year-Old Na’alehu Man Dies in Single Motor Vehicle Crash

One 61-year-old man died in a single motor vehicle traffic crash Monday morning (August 29) in South Kona near the 85-mile marker of Hawaiʻi Belt Road (Route 11).

HPDBadgeHe has been identified as Brysson Lorenzo Sr. of Nāʻālehu.

Responding to a 2:57 a.m. call, police determined that Lorenzo had been operating a 1994 Kenworth tractor-trailer northbound on Hawaiʻi Belt Road near the 85-mile marker when he ran off the right shoulder of the roadway and collided with a rock embankment. The collision caused the tractor-trailer to overturn onto its left side and catch fire. Lorenzo was taken to Kona Community Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 8:40 a.m.

Police do not believe speed was a factor in this crash and it is not immediately known if alcohol was a factor.

An autopsy has been ordered to determine the exact cause of death.

The Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a coroner’s inquest investigation and is asking for anyone who witnessed the crash to call Officer Kimo Keliipaakaua at 326-4646, extension 229. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.

This is the 17th traffic fatality this year compared with 15 at this time last year.

New Restaurants, Exhibitors Join Taste Hawaiian Range Sept. 9

Fresh and nutritious Hawai’i Island food and the people who produce it are the stars of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range 6-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Taste HaydenTasty culinary stations, food producer booths and agricultural-themed displays—totaling over 75 stations— will sprawl both inside and out at the resort’s conference center.

Pre-sale tickets are available online for $45 through midnight September 8 and at island wide locations until sold out; they are $60 at the door. Details: www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Each Taste chef is assigned to prepare a whopping 100 pounds of a specific cut of pasture-raised beef—or locally sourced pork, lamb, mutton, goat or USDA-inspected wild boar—and the result is a festive adventure of tasting everything from tongue to tail. Most of the beef cuts are utilized so chefs and attendees can get acquainted with not-so-familiar cuts while having fun. The pasture-raised beef is sourced from local, humanely raised cattle that are free of antibiotics and hormones.

Taste ShankIn addition to “grazing” on expertly prepared beef sirloin, lamb or Rocky Mountain Oysters—aka bull’s testicles—attendees can taste samples at local food product booths and view compelling educational displays on sustainability and agriculture.

New participating exhibitors include Beyond Organic Consulting, Waimea Butcher Shop, Paradise Hawaii Balsamics, Spicy Ninja Sauce, Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death, Farm Works Hawaii, Orchid Isle Traders, Hawaii Lassi-Akmal Foods, USDA Farm Service Agency and UH-CTAHR Veterinary Extension.

Restaurants debuting at the 2016 Taste include Noodle Club, Waipio Cook House, 3 Fat Pigs, Daylight Mind Coffee Company Waikoloa, Monstera and The Fish Hopper.

Also new will be a streaming video shown at different event locations featuring seven Big Island ranchers and farmers talking story about why they produce food.

taste2015

Those wanting to learn first-hand how to use and prepare 100 percent pasture-raised beef can attend the event’s annual Cooking 101 culinary demonstration. This year’s team of guest presenters are chefs Kevin Hanney and J Schoonover of Oahu’s 12 Ave Grill and Kokohead Café. The 3 p.m. presentation includes sampling and is $10; tix available online or at the door. A 1 p.m. seminar, “Learn Where Beef Cuts Come From,” is free.

Islandwide tickets locations include Kuhio Grille in Hilo, Kamuela Liquors and Parker Ranch Store in Waimea, Kona Wine Market in Kailua-Kona and Kohala Essence Shop at Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Watch for ticket giveaways on Facebook at Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Twitter #TasteHI. For general event information, phone (808) 322-4892.

Hawai‘i residents eager to savor the flavors of the Taste can take advantage of Hilton Waikoloa Village’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range Package with rates starting at $239 + tax per room on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. This Kama‘aina Special also includes two tickets to the Taste of the Hawaiian Range. Guests must show valid Hawai‘i state ID at checkin and must have Hawai‘i address in reservation. Pre- and post-event hotel room prices start at $149 plus tax per room, per night, based on availability. To book an overnight stay at Hilton Waikoloa Village under an exclusive Taste of the Hawaiian Range room package (code TSH), visit www.hiltonwaikoloavillage.com/kamaaina, or https://secure3.hilton.com/en_US/hi/reservation/book.htm?hotel=KOAHWHH&spec_plan=TSH&arrivaldate=20151009 or call 1-800-HILTONS.

 

McDonalds of Hawaii Offering Free Coffee on Tuesdays for Teachers During “Teacher Appreciation Month”

McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii honors teachers during “Teacher Appreciation Month” with a free medium cup of hot or iced McCafe Royal Kona Blend every Tuesdays during the month of September at all participating McDonald’s restaurants in Hawaii.
McCafe

DETAILS:

McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii wants to thank teachers for all they do for our keiki.                       

Details are as follows:

  • No purchase necessary
  • Teachers must present their valid 2016 school ID upon ordering
  • Limit one free cup of coffee per person, per visit
  • Offer dates: September 6, September 13, September 20 and September 27
  • Offer times:  Entire day

Coast Guard Urges Public to Prepare for Heavy Weather Ahead of Hurricane Madeline

The Coast Guard is urging the public to prepare for the onset of heavy weather expected to impact the Hawaiian Islands, Wednesday.

epac satCurrently, Hurricane Madeline has maximum winds of 100 mph and is expected to generate high surf throughout the Main Hawaiian Islands.

Mariners and beachgoers should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through newspapers, the internet and local television, radio stations and official accounts on social media. Boaters can monitor the progress of the storm on VHF channel 16. Small craft advisories and warnings are also broadcast on VHF channel 16.

The Coast Guard is working closely with local and state first responder agencies. Once the storm begins to impact the islands, emergency responders may not be able to assist those in danger. The public is urged to heed all evacuation orders. Mariners should seek safe harbor and shelter.

Additionally, mariners should secure their boats and boating equipment. Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to protected marinas where they will be less likely to break free of their moorings or to be otherwise damaged. Smaller boats should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding and is protected from high winds. Regardless of location, all loose items aboard vessels should be secured or removed.

Visitors to Hawaii should heed all warnings from lifeguards and public health and safety officials. Although weather conditions may appear favorable, rip tides and high surf may impact beaches far in advance of the actual storm. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to strong storm-generated waves and currents. Swimmers are urged to stay clear of beaches until local officials say the water is safe. Near-shore waters may become contaminated due to runoff for several days following a storm.

Media interested in conducting interviews with the Coast Guard regarding preparations for the impending storms should contact the Coast Guard 14th District public affairs office at 808-525-3230.

Hurricane ManualA PDF version of the Hawai’i Boater’s Hurricane and Tsunami Safety Manual can be found at the following link: http://seagrant.noaa.gov/SeaGrantSearch/TabId/526/ArtMID/3568/ArticleID/354/Hawai%e2%80%98i-Boater%e2%80%99s-Hurricane-and-Tsunami-Safety-Manual.aspx.

For more information on hurricane preparedness, visit the National Hurricane Center’s Web page at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/.

The World’s Worst Lyft Passenger Freaks On Hawaiian Bobble Doll

I don’t know what to say about this lady who is freaking out on this Lyft driver for having a Hawaiian Bobble Doll on his dashboard:

  • The video purports to show a woman named ‘AN’ arguing with a driver
  • She berates him for being ‘disrespectful’ by having the bobblehead
  • At one point she says he’s white and he tells her he’s Asian
    But she continues to complain, eventually upsetting the other passenger
  • The video ends with her calling him a ‘f******g dumba** idiot’

Hawaii County Civil Defense Message – Hurricane Madeline Update

This is a Civil Defense Message. This is a Hurricane Madeline update for Monday, August 29th at 11 AM.
madeline7A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Hawaii County. A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible in Hawaii County within the next 48 hours.

As of 11 AM today the National Weather Service reports Hurricane Madeline is located about 630 miles east of Hilo. Madeline strengthened overnight, and sustained winds are 115 miles per hour with higher gusts.

Madeline is moving to the west-northwest at 10 miles per hour. Effects of the storm are expected to be felt as early as Wednesday, including heavy rains, high surf, and high wind.

In preparation for Hurricane Madeline, the public is advised to be StormReady.

Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include a flashlight with fresh batteries, cash, first aid supplies, and any medication or supplies specific to you or your family members.

Plan how to communicate with family members. Create an evacuation plan for your household. Bring in or secure outdoor furniture and other items that could blow away.

Keep your vehicle fueled and cell phone charged.

Find more StormReady tips and sign up for notifications at hawaiicounty.gov.

Civil Defense will maintain close communications with the National Weather Service and monitor the system. Continue to monitor your local radio broadcasts for up-to-date information.

Interior Department and Senator Brian Schatz Announce Additional Federal Support to Combat Rapid Ohia Death

In response to a request from Senator Brian Schatz (D-HI), the U.S. Department of the Interior announced today $497,000 in additional federal funding to combat a tree-killing fungus that causes Rapid ‘Ohia Death (ROD), a disease that threatens the State’s tropical forests and delicate ecosystems which could jeopardize local water supplies and Hawai‘i’s economic vitality. The funding comes on the eve of the World Conservation Congress that is convening for the first time in the United States this week in Honolulu.

Rapid Ohia Death

Today’s funding announcement immediately activates an Early Detection Rapid Response Team (EDRR Team) and leverages another $673,000 of in-kind Federal contributions to suppress or contain a disease that potentially could have enormous biological, economic, social and cultural repercussions for the Aloha State. The EDRR Team comprised of Federal and state agencies and a consortium of scientists will immediately begin to conduct field surveys for the disease, support critical research to pioneer adaptive treatment protocols and complete assessments of those treatments.

“Rapid ‘Ohia Death is a biosecurity issue that warrants urgent action. It threatens to leave Hawai‘i’s forests, ecosystems, watersheds and commerce in a vulnerable state. Agencies must work together to generate the science needed to support decisive decisions,” said U.S. Department of the Interior Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Kristen J. Sarri. “Our funding will enable this to happen. An Early Detection and Rapid Response Team will identify and rapidly respond to diseased trees while pioneering effective treatment options that will preserve the cultural significance of the ‘ohia for Native Hawaiians and enable the species to continue to provide countless ecological benefits to the State for generations to come. What we learn from this interagency approach will be applicable to addressing other invasive species of priority concern, in Hawai’i and across the United States.”

“This is an ecological emergency, and it requires everyone working together to save Hawai‘i Island’s native forests. I’m pleased to see our federal partners step up to help. The additional funding will make a big difference, and it will give us the tools to understand the disease, develop better management responses, and protect our ‘ohia,” said U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-HI).

At the invitation of Senator Schatz, Sarri is attending a summit today with scientific experts, leaders from the conservation community and government leaders to better understand the current status of ROD management and science, discuss developments, and identify the most pressing opportunities to make progress.

The fungal disease is attacking and killing the ‘ohia lehua, a tree species sacred to Native Hawaiians that covers nearly one million acres in the Hawaiian archipelago. It is a keystone species for 60% of Hawai‘i’s forests and is integral to keeping the State’s delicate ecosystem in balance. The fungus causing ROD, first identified in 2014, already claimed 38,000 acres of trees on Hawai‘i Island where nearly two-thirds of the tree species lives. Scientists and resource managers worry that ROD will continue to ravage Hawai‘i Island’s forests and spread to other islands. This could potentially decimate habitat for many rare, threatened and endangered species, as well as jeopardize water resources and native cultural practices unless immediate interventions are implemented, including strengthening early detection and rapid response actions.

The disease was first confirmed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the University of Hawai‘i (UH). The State of Hawai‘i responded quickly by implementing an emergency ban on the movement of ‘ohia plant parts and soil interisland and intrastate, and requesting further assistance. Immediately, numerous agencies and organizations at the local, state and federal levels, including USFS, ARS, UH and Interior’s U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service formed a working group to improve detection, understand the spread and develop mitigation measures for ROD.

This multi-organizational effort facilitated sharing information, coordinated research and resource management and spurred public education and outreach efforts. As a result of these efforts, scientists were able to identify a fungus as the cause of the ‘ohia tree’s mortality, as well as develop methods to detect the fungal agent, and are tracking the spread of the disease. Hawai‘i mapped the location of diseased trees and instituted biosecurity measures to contain the spread of ROD, as well as kicked off a major public education effort to better inform landowners, resource managers and the general public about the disease.

The Federal government is committed to improving its ability to prevent invasive species from impacting national assets. The President’s Priority Agenda on enhancing climate resilience called for a national framework for the early detection of and response to invasive species. In response, an interdepartmental report, Safeguarding America’s Lands and Waters from Invasive Species: A National Framework for Early Detection and Rapid Response was released last February. The recommendations in that report have since been taken up as priority actions in the recently adopted 2016-2018 National Invasive Species Council (NISC) Management Plan. Implementation of the Management Plan is already in progress. Assessments are being conducted of the Federal authorities, programmatic structures and technical capacities needed to support a national program for the early detection of and rapid response to invasive species. NISC anticipates releasing the findings in early 2017.

Hurricane WATCH Issued for Hawaii County

A Hurricane Watch has been issued for Hawaii County.

Hurricane Madeline2

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Hawaii County.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area. A Hurricane Watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical storm force winds… conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

Interests elsewhere in the main Hawaiian Islands should monitor the progress of Madeline. Watches may be required for additional Hawaiian Islands later today or tonight.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK

At 1100 AM HST (2100 UTC), the center of Hurricane Madeline was located near latitude 18.6 North, longitude 145.5 West. Madeline is moving toward the west-northwest near 10 mph (17 km/h). A gradual turn toward the west is expected by Tuesday, with little change in forward speed.

Maximum sustained winds are near 115 mph (185 km/h) with higher gusts. Madeline is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Little change in intensity is expected through Tuesday, with weakening forecast thereafter.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles (45 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles (185 km).

The estimated minimum central pressure is 966 mb (28.53 inches).

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

WIND: Winds to hurricane force are possible over Hawaii County on Wednesday.

SURF: Swells generated by Madeline are expected to reach the Hawaiian Islands over the next couple of days, possibly becoming damaging along some coastlines Wednesday and Thursday.

RAIN: Heavy rains associated with Madeline may reach Hawaii County on Wednesday, and may impact other Hawaiian Islands Wednesday night and Thursday.

Big Island Police Searching for 17-Year-Old Illinois Girl

UPDATE: Aleah March, a 17-year old female from Illinois previously reported missing has been located.

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 17-year-old Illinois girl who was reported missing.

Aleah March

Aleah March

Aleah March was last seen in Illinois on July. She visited Hawaiʻi and was last heard from on August 19. She was believed to have been in the Pāhoa area.

She is described as Caucasian, 5-foot-4, 115 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Investigating Mountain View Fatality

An unidentified man died over the weekend from injuries sustained in a one-vehicle crash on Highway 11 at the intersection of North Glenwood Road in Mountain View.

At 10:28 p.m. Friday (August 26), Puna patrol officers observed a Chevrolet two-door sedan with severe damage in a ditch off Highway 11 near North Glenwood Road.

glennwood

It was determined that the car had been traveling Hilo bound on Highway 11 and had struck a rock retaining wall. The driver, who was the sole occupant, was not wearing a seat belt and died at the scene.

Police believe that speed was a factor. It is unknown if drugs or alcohol were involved.

The man was taken to Hilo Medical Center, where he was officially pronounced dead at 3:53 a.m. Saturday.

The Area I Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a coroner’s inquest investigation. An autopsy has been ordered to determine the exact cause of death.

The man’s name is being withheld pending positive identification and notification of next of kin.

Police ask anyone who witnessed the crash to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or contact Officer Casey Cabral at 961-8889 or casey.cabral@hawaiicounty.gov.

This is the 16th fatality on Hawaiʻi Island this year compared with 15 at this time last year.