Coast Guard Tows Disabled Fishing Vessel Back To Honolulu

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Friday.

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them safely to the pier.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a report Wednesday from the crew of fishing vessel Lily Kaileia that they were disabled and adrift approximately 115 miles south of Honolulu Harbor.

Sector Honolulu launched the Kittiwake to tow the Lily Kaileia back to shore due to the fact that the vessel was drifting and there was no commercial or private vessel assistance available.

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Kittiwake is a Marine Protector Class Patrol Boat homeported in Honolulu. As one of Sector Honolulu’s most versatile afloat assets, Kittiwake provides support to over 50,000 square miles around the waters of the Hawaiian Islands conducting law enforcement patrols, search and rescue missions as well as aiding in living marine resources and marine protected species missions.

New Lava Flow Map Released

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field at the coast.

hvomap81916

Lava is reaching the sea along a broad area about 1 km (0.6 miles) long.

The area of the active flow field as of August 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as mapped on August 19 is shown in red. The base is a Digital Globe image from January 2016.

Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory Update – Lava Reaching Ocean 0.6 Miles Wide

Measuring how much lava is flowing through the 61g tube.

hvo81916HVO geologist conducts a VLF (very low frequency) survey across the episode 61g lava tube to measure the depth and cross-sectional area of lava flowing within the tube.

hvo81916aAerial view of the Kamokuna ocean entry. Lava is reaching the sea along a broad area about 1 km (0.6 miles) long.

hvo81916bIn this view, the 61g lava flow is lighter gray in color compared to older lavas.

Mick Kalber posted the following video earlier today:

Hawaii Island Festival of Birds Welcomes All

The Hawai’i Island Festival of Birds – Ha`akula Manu – is pleased to announce that, thanks to the generous support of our sponsors, local keiki (children) 15 and under accompanied by an adult with a paid general admission ticket can attend the festival for FREE!  Adult entry is $10 and includes $5 of Birdie Bucks coupons that can be spent on items at the vendor booths and silent auction.

Bird Festival 2016The Hawai’i Island Festival of Birds is an opportunity for Big Island keiki to increase their knowledge of birds and their habitats. The festival will highlight the important role played by birds in Hawaiian culture, the need to preserve and restore our island’s unique habitats critical to these birds’ survival, and help children learn that birding is a just like a real life, fun version of Pokemon-Go!

The Festival, scheduled for the weekend of September 24-25 at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa at Keauhou Bay, includes on-site events on Saturday and field trips on Sunday. The Saturday, September 24 events held at the Sheraton Kona will include educational seminars, bird-related trade and arts booths, and fun activities for the whole family. The seminars will be stimulating for adults and teens, while younger ones will enjoy the hands-on activities related to Hawaii’s unique birds. General admission tickets can be purchased at the door.

Sunday activities include guided birdwatching field trips hosted by Hawaii Forest & Trail, a bird photography tour hosted by Jack Jeffrey, and a guided boat trip out of Honokohau Harbor to watch seabirds with on-board pelagic leaders Lance Tanino, Brian Sullivan and Mike Scott. Tours are already discounted to $150 with no additional discount for keiki or kama’aina. Space is limited on field trips, so register now if you would like to take advantage of this great deal (includes transportation, lunch, dinner, and guides).

Here are a few of the family-oriented activities everyone can participate in at the Festival:

  • Build a Bird Contest – Create a unique bird out of supplied materials to keep or enter into a contest to win a T-shirt.
  • Birdwatching Basics – Here’s how to get started on a new hobby that can turn into a lifelong passion (may also be used as partial fulfillment for Scout merit badge requirements).
  • Where in the World? – See if you can identify the original homes of our island birds (hint: some are found only here in Hawaii!).
  • Trivial Pursuit – Our own island bird edition.
  • Birds and Beaks – Take a close-up look at how the beaks of our island birds are adapted for the foods they find here.

“The Hawai’i Island Festival of Birds, with the help of experts who will be joining us to teach, will give our keiki a chance to learn more about the birds of Hawaii,” said Hawaii Forest & Trails’s Rob Pacheco.  “The learning is just a first step though.  Through learning, kids gain an appreciation and develop a fascination with birds, which then, often leads to a lifelong affair with nature.”

Festival sponsors include Hawaii Tourism Authority, County of Hawaii, Alaska Airlines, Audubon Magazine, Hawaii Forest and Trail, Destination Marketing Hawaii and others.

For more information and Festival registration, please visit the website hawaiibirdingtrails.com.

Hawaiian Stilt Returns Home

A little endangered Hawaiian Stilt chick is all grown up and ready to be on its own after a seven week stay at the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center (HWC).
The Stilt at 2 weeks

The Stilt at 2 weeks

The chick was rescued on O‘ahu and after an unsuccessful attempt to reunite the chick with its parents, it was decided that the young bird would need to be sent to HWC to be raised until it was old enough to be on its own. The successful rescue and release was a team effort by USDA Wildlife Services, Wheels for Wildlife volunteers, Feather and Fur Animal Hospital, the Hawai‘i Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW), and the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center.
The Stilt at 5 Weeks

The Stilt at 5 Weeks

While at HWC, the chick was monitored using a remote camera system and staff took great care to prevent the stilt from becoming accustomed to humans. In addition to minimizing physical contact, HWC staff used a mirror and photos of stilt habitat and Hawaiian Stilt adults in the incubator and aviary to provide some enrichment while the bird was in HWC care.
The Stilt at 7 Weeks before its release

The Stilt at 7 Weeks before its release

The bird’s growth was documented through weekly pictures taken from intake until it was transferred to O‘ahu DOFAW staff for release yesterday.
Stilt Growth
This release is the latest in a busy release week for HWC, including a Hawaiian Duck (Koloa Maoli) from O‘ahu, Wedge-tailed Shearwater (‘Ua‘u kani) from O‘ahu, and a White-tailed Tropicbird (Koa‘e kea) from O‘ahu.

UH Hilo Basketball Team Announces Six New Recruits

The 2015-16 University of Hawai’I at Hilo men’s basketball team won four of its last five games, just missing out on a post-season berth in the Pacific West Conference tournament.

Needing to replace three starters off of that squad and two other graduated players, head coach G.E. Coleman has accomplished that with the signing of six standout players. The list includes four transfers and two freshmen.

One of those transfers brings NCAA tournament experience to the Vulcan camp. 6’6″ wing Brian Ishola played two seasons at North Dakota State, including a freshman campaign that saw the Bison win the Summit League and advance to the Big Dance, falling to Gonzaga in the first round (86-76).

Brian Ishola

Brian Ishola

A junior, Ishola hails from Woodbury, Minnesota and prepped at East Ridge High School.

Coleman also landed three junior college players. Junior point guard Ryley Callaghan comes to the UHH campus from Peninsula Community College (Wash.), where he was named the Most Valuable Player of the North Division of the Northwest Athletic Conference (NWAC) after averaging 14.7 points a game and nearly three assists a contest.

Ryley Callaghan

Ryley Callaghan

The 6’1″ Port Orchard, Wash. native drilled 69 three-pointers on the season. He prepped at South Kitsap High School.

Wing Donavan Taylor is a 6’3″ starter from Chaffey CC (Calif.), where he averaged nine points and 6.5 rebounds a game.

Donavan Taylor

Donavan Taylor

Taylor played at Silverado High School in Compton, Calif.

Arnold Silva is a 6’5″ forward that played the past two seasons at Santa Rosa JC (Calif.), averaging 7.1 points and a team-best 7.2 rebounds a contest.

Arnold Silva

Arnold Silva

He came to Santa Rose from Healdsburg, Calif.

The most noticeable recruit is 6’11” freshman Onyx Boyd.

Onyx Boyd

The Virginia Beach native missed half of his senior season at Bishop Sullivan Catholic High School with an injury, but prior to that was on the radar of a number of NCAA Division I programs.

As a junior, he ranked sixth in the state of Virginia in scoring.

Rounding out the class is freshman Eric Wattree, a 6’3″ wing from South Kitsap, Wash.

Eric Wattree

Eric Wattree

Wattree, a former high school teammate of Callaghan, averaged nearly 25 points a game and three assists a contest for the Wolves. His father Eric, Sr., was a collegiate standout at Wyoming and Azusa Pacific.

“This is a great recruiting class for us,” Coleman said. “We’ve added height and talent, and I feel like we finally look like a full-fledged Division II team. That’s a start for where we need to be, because we play in what I think is the toughest D-II league in the country in the Pacific West Conference.”

The Vulcans will open the 2016-17 season on the road, taking on west region schools Simon Fraser (Nov. 11), Seattle Pacific (Nov. 12) and Saint Martin’s (Nov. 15). UHH will also play sister school and 2015-16 NCAA tournament squad UH Manoa, at the Stan Sheriff Center on Nov. 22.

Scallops Linked to Hawaii Hepatitis A Outbreak Shipped to Nevada and California Too

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local officials are investigating an outbreak of hepatitis A illnesses linked to raw scallops.

Fast Facts

  • The FDA and CDC are supporting the Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) in an investigation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections linked to scallops supplied by Sea Port Products Corp. On August 17, 2016, Hawaii Department of Health reported that 206 people have been confirmed to have become ill with hepatitis A in that state.
  • On August 17, 2016, the FDA, Hawaii DOH, CDC and state partners informed Sea Port Products Corp that epidemiological, laboratory and traceback information indicates their scallops are the likely source of illnesses. On August 18, 2016, Sea Port Products Corp initiated a voluntary recall of frozen Bay Scallops produced on November 23, 2015 and 24, 2015. The products were distributed to California, Hawaii, and Nevada.  According to Sea Port Products Corp, the recalled products are not intended for retail sale. The FDA is working with the recalling firm to ensure their recall is effective and that recalled product is removed from the market.
  • Restaurants and other retailers should not sell or serve the recalled Bay Scallops. According to Sea Port Products Corp, the recalled products are not intended for retail sale. Consumers should ask the restaurant or retailer where their scallops came from to make sure they do not eat recalled Bay Scallops from Sea Port Products Corp.

What is the Problem and What is Being Done About It?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are supporting the State of Hawaii in an investigation of hepatitis A illnesses linked to raw scallops.

According to the Hawaii Department of Health (DOH), 206 people have been confirmed to have become ill with hepatitis A. Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 12, 2016 to August 9, 2016. All cases have been in adults and 51 have required hospitalization.

The FDA’s traceback investigation involved working with Hawaii DOH to trace the path of food eaten by those made ill back to a common source. The traceback investigation determined that Sea Port Products Corp imported the scallops that were later supplied to certain Genki Sushi locations in Hawaii, where ill people reported eating.

On August 17, 2016, FDA laboratory analysis of two scallop samples, which were collected on August 11, 2016, were confirmed positive for hepatitis A. These samples were imported by Sea Port Products Corp.

The FDA, CDC and state partners immediately informed Sea Port Products Corp that epidemiological, laboratory and traceback information indicates their scallops are the likely source of illnesses. On August 18, 2016, Sea Port Products Corp initiated a voluntary recall of frozen Bay Scallops produced on November 23, 2015 and 24, 2015. The products were distributed to California, Hawaii, and Nevada. According to Sea Port Products Corp, the recalled products are not intended for retail sale. The FDA is working with the recalling firm to ensure their recall is effective and that recalled product is removed from the market.

What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. Hepatitis A is usually spread when a person ingests fecal matter — even in microscopic amounts — from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the feces of an infected person (fecal-oral route).

What are the Symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Illness occurs within 15 to 50 days of exposure and in adults includes fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool.

Who is at Risk?

Hepatitis A is a disease that originates in and is spread by people, rather than animals. It can occur  when an infected food handler prepares food without appropriate hand hygiene. However, food (as is suspected in this outbreak) or water contaminated with HAV can cause outbreaks of disease.

In rare cases, particularly in patients with pre-existing severe illness or who are immunocompromised, HAV infection can progress to liver failure and death.  People who have underlying liver conditions or pre-existing severe illness, or who are immunocompromised, should be vaccinated for HAV.

What Specific Products were Recalled?

On August 18, 2016, Sea Port Products Corp initiated a voluntary recall of frozen Bay Scallops produced on November 23, 2015 and 24, 2015.

scallops

The products were distributed to California, Hawaii, and Nevada. According to Sea Port Products Corp, the recalled products are not intended for retail sale.

What Do Restaurants and Retailers Need To Do?

Retailers and other food service operators should not sell or serve the recalled products. These operations should also:

  • Wash and sanitize display cases and refrigerators where potentially contaminated products were stored.
  • Wash and sanitize cutting boards, surfaces, and utensils used to prepare, serve, or store potentially contaminated products.
  • Wash hands with hot water and soap following the cleaning and sanitation process.
  • Retailers, restaurants, and other food service operators who have processed and packaged any potentially contaminated products need to be concerned about cross contamination of cutting surfaces and utensils through contact with the potentially contaminated products.

What Do Consumers Need To Do?

Water, shellfish, and salads are the most frequent foodborne sources of hepatitis A. You can avoid Hepatitis A transmission from seafood by thoroughly cooking it. Hepatitis A can be transmitted from person to person. Consumers should always practice safe food handling and preparation measures.  Wash hands, utensils, and surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling food. Consumers should thoroughly wash their hands after using the bathroom and changing diapers to help protect themselves from hepatitis A, as well as other foodborne diseases.

Consumers should ask the restaurant or retailer where their scallops came from to make sure they do not eat recalled Bay Scallops from Sea Port Products Corp.

The FDA has provided information on selecting and serving fresh and frozen seafood safely.  Some people are at greater risk for foodborne illness and should not eat raw or partially cooked fish or shellfish. These susceptible groups include:

  • Pregnant women
  • Young children
  • Older adults
  • Persons whose immune systems are compromised
  • Persons who have decreased stomach acidity

If you are unsure of your risk, ask your healthcare provider.

Who Should be Contacted?

Contact your healthcare provider if you think you may have become ill from eating raw scallops.

The FDA encourages consumers with questions about food safety to call 1-888-SAFEFOOD Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern time, or to consult http://www.fda.gov.

Hawaii Residents Can Spot the Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).

International Space Station

It will be visible beginning tonight, Friday, August 19th, at 7:55 PM. It will be visible for approximately 3 minutes at a Maximum Height of 75 degrees. It will appear 21 degrees above the Northwest part of the sky and disappear 40 degrees above the South Southeast part of the sky.