UH Hilo Announces Resignation of Softball Coach

University of Hawai’i at Hilo Athletic Director Patrick Guillen today announced the resignation of Softball Head Coach Patty “Peejay” Brun, effective July 1, 2016. Brun leaves UH Hilo to become associate head softball coach at Texas State University.

Patty "Peejay" Brun

Patty “Peejay” Brun

“I have very mixed emotions with Coach Brun’s departure,” Guillen said. “On one hand, I am happy for her and her family who she will be reunited with in Texas and also for this professional opportunity to move back to the NCAA I level.  But selfishly, Vulcan Athletics is losing a top-notch coach who is a great mentor, educator and leader for our softball student-athletes.

“I am grateful to Coach Brun for her tireless work ethic and commitment to building a solid program that our community is proud of.  Our loss is certainly Texas State’s gain.”

Brun joined UH Hilo in 2014. In her two seasons with the Vulcans, her teams compiled a 63-33-1 record with back-to-back 30-win seasons and produced an all-American.

“I’d like to thank Chancellor Donald Straney and Tim Moore for giving me the opportunity to be at the helm of UH Hilo softball,” Brun said. “I’d also like to thank the University and town of Hilo for embracing me and helping me transition so quickly.  The love and aloha that was shown to me from the moment I stepped on the island has meant so much.

“It has been an absolute privilege to coach here and be a part of the Vulcan family. Finally, I’d like to thank Pat Guillen for his great support this year.  His vision for the program is one that I know will help take it to great success.

“The next step has presented itself in this opportunity to coach and be with my family and it was an opportunity we felt could not be turned down.”

A search for Brun’s replacement will begin immediately.

“I am confident we will be able to identify and bring in a quality coach,” Guillen said. “We have some big shoes to fill.”

Animal Control Activities and Temporary Closure Planned at Mauna Kea Forest Reserve

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities on Hawaii island on designated dates in July and September.

Mouflon

These planned activities are specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters of feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids.

These activities will take place within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), as well as in the Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve (Unit K), Palila Mitigation Lands, and the Kaohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawaii.

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawaii.

Control schedule dates are July 5 and 6, and September 20 and 21, 2016.  Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve, Palila Mitigation Lands, the Kaohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

  • 7 a.m. July 5, and September 20, 2016
  • 6 a.m. July 6, and September 21, 2016

These actions are pursuant to Hawaii Administrative Rules Chapters 13-130-19 and 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.  The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

  • Locked 7 p.m. July 4, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. July 6, 2016
  • Locked 7 p.m. September 19, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. September 21, 2016

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted from 9 a.m. June 29, 2016, to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.

Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.  A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Ahumoa location and 15 permitted vehicles at the Pu’u Mali location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicle are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

Salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On July 5, and September 20, 2016, at Ahumoa. Permittees must meet at Kilohana Hunter Check Station at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On July 6, and September 21, 2016 at Pu’u Mali. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.

EPA Enforces Ban on U.S. Army’s Cesspools on Oahu and Big Island – Army Fined $100,000

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced an agreement with the U.S. Army to close four illegal large capacity cesspools on Oahu and eight on the Big Island. The Army will pay a $100,000 fine, the first time EPA has imposed a civil penalty against a federal government facility for operating banned cesspools.

Click to read

Click to read

“The convening of the International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu this week serves as a reminder of why EPA is focused on shutting down all large capacity cesspools,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Our goal is to protect Hawaii’s coastal waters.”

EPA found that the Army continued to use the cesspools despite a 2005 ban under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act’s Underground Injection Control program. The Army had failed to close three large capacity cesspools at Wheeler Army Airfield and one at Schofield Barracks on Oahu, as well as eight on the Big Island at the Pohakuloa Training area and the Kilauea Military Camp.

As a result of EPA’s enforcement action, the Army has closed one cesspool, and replaced two others at Wheeler Army Airfield and another at Schofield Barracks with approved wastewater treatment systems. Under the settlement agreement, the Army must also close or replace all eight of the large capacity cesspools still in use on the Big Island.

Cesspools collect and discharge untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and harmful chemicals can contaminate groundwater, streams and the ocean. They are used more widely in Hawaii than any other state. Throughout Hawaii, over 3,000 large capacity cesspools have been closed since the 2005 ban, many through voluntary compliance. The EPA regulations do not apply to single-family homes connected to their own individual cesspools.

For more information on the case, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/region9/enforcement/pubnotices/pubnotice-us-army.html

For more information on the large capacity cesspool ban, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii