Florida Man Charged in Making Bomb Threat at Hilo Bank

Editors Note – Official government public records show that Russell Rishi Monlux (born on 10/28/1986) was booked into jail on Friday, February 14, 2014 in Gadsden County, Florida.

A 29-year-old Hilo man has been charged with two offenses in connection with a bomb threat at a bank in Hilo.

Russell Monlux

Florida Mugshot

At 3:45 p.m. Russell Monlux was charged with two counts of second-degree terroristic threatening. His bail was set at $4,000. He remains at the Hilo police cellblock pending his initial court appearance scheduled for Monday (June 13).

Russell Monlux Hilo Mug

Hilo Mugshot

In response to a 12:04 p.m. call, South Hilo Patrol officers learned that a male customer had passed a handwritten bomb threat to a teller at a bank in a supermarket on the 300 block of Makaʻala Street in Hilo shortly before noon. The store was evacuated as a precaution.

At 1:20 p.m., police arrested Monlux.

He was charged with two counts of terroristic threatening because both the bank and the store were exposed to the threat.

Ku’ikahi Mediation Center Brown Bag Lunch Series – “Finding Solutions, Growing Peace”

The non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts a free talk on June 16 as part of their “Finding Solutions, Growing Peace” Brown Bag Lunch Series.  Talks are Third Thursdays from 12 noon to 1 pm in the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney at 655 Kilauea Avenue in Hilo.

Dr. Gregory Chun

Dr. Gregory Chun

This month’s speaker is Dr. Gregory Chun on the topic “T-Shirts, Banners, and Badges: Reflections on Community Advocacy and Intractability in Hawai‘i.”

“Why do we get stuck in so many of our community conversations?” asks Dr. Chun.  “Why is there a growing trend towards people taking nonnegotiable positions in sometimes controversial issues?”

He says, “I want to help those working in advocacy, development, conflict resolution, and community, and government with historical, cultural, and social factors that I feel contribute to this intractability and introduce strategies for them to consider.”

Gregory Chun, Ph.D. has lived and worked on Hawai‘i Island since 1999, serving in positions with Parker Ranch, Kamehameha Investment Corporation, and Kamehameha Schools. Currently with the University of Hawaii at Manoa, he is developing a program of interdisciplinary studies that includes resource management, community development, and well-being, with a particular focus on serving Native Hawaiians and underserved communities.

Ku‘ikahi’s Brown Bag Lunch Series is free and open to the public.  Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lunch, enjoy an informal and educational talk-story session, and meet others interested in “Finding Solutions, Growing Peace.”

This lunch-and-learn series is made possible thanks in part to funding from the Atherton Family Foundation.  For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Gail Takaki at 935-7844 x 9 or gail@hawaiimediation.org.  Or visit www.hawaiimediaiton.org.

36th Annual Hawaii Volcanoes Cultural Festival & BioBlitz

Mark your calendars for the free Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival & BioBlitz, Saturday, August 27, 2016!

Keiki & alaka‘i head into the rainforest on a BioBlitz species inventory at last year's BioBlitz. NPS Photo/Janice Wei

Keiki & alaka‘i head into the rainforest on a BioBlitz species inventory at last year’s BioBlitz. NPS Photo/Janice Wei

This year’s festival honors the park’s centennial anniversary and connects visitors and the community to the culture, biology and geology of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve.

Themed E Ho‘omau (to perpetuate; to continue in a way that causes good to be long-lasting), the 36th annual cultural festival invites people of all ages to engage in authentic Hawaiian cultural practices and learn how native Hawaiians lived closely to the land as its stewards. Enjoy hula and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try Hawaiian crafts. Performers include Hālau o Akaunu with Manaiakalani Kalua, Kenneth Makuakāne, Kai Ho‘opi‘i, and Diana Aki, plus many more.

This year’s festival will again include a “BioBlitz,” a hands-on opportunity for families and individuals to observe and document the biodiversity that thrives in the lava flows and native rainforests of Kīlauea volcano. In mid-July, participants will be able to sign up for any of the BioBlitz field inventories, which include “Hiding in Plain Sight: the Insects and Spiders of the Park,” a birding excursion “Feathers in the Forest,” and “Na Mea o Kanu o Ka Hula (The Plants of Hula),” on the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park website. The field inventories are led by experts at the forefront of conservation, science and traditional Hawaiian culture.

The BioBlitz runs from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., and the cultural festival is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, August 27. Entrance and all events are free.

2016 is the 100th anniversary for Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. To find out what’s happening throughout 2016, visit the park website. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and to learn about centennial events at other national parks, visit FindYourPark.com

Hilo Man Arrested in Connection With Bomb Threat at Bank

A man was arrested Thursday (June 9) in connection with a bomb threat at a bank in Hilo.

HPDBadge

In response to a 12:04 p.m. call, South Hilo Patrol officers learned that a male customer had passed a handwritten bomb threat to a teller at a bank in a supermarket on the 300 block of Makaʻala Street in Hilo shortly before noon. The store was evacuated as a precaution.

At 1:20 p.m., police arrested the customer, identified as 29-year-old Russell Monlux of Hilo. He was taken to the Hilo police cellblock while police continue the investigation. The case is classified as a terroristic threatening.

Puako Makai Watch Hosts Workshop for Interested Volunteers

An educational workshop is planned on Saturday, June 11, for interested community members who want to learn more about ongoing resource management and conservation in Puakō.

Puako Image

Puakō Makai Watch will host, ‘’Ike Kai,” which is designed to inform and engage community members on how they can volunteer with the Puakō Makai Watch program.

Information to be covered will also include basic ecology about marine life found in the area, and details about the Puakō Fisheries Management Area. Additionally, ‘Ike Kai is a user-friendly curriculum intended for the general public to gain a better understanding of rules and regulations associated with the Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR) and how as a community we can work together.

The workshop will include a brief overview of the Makai Watch program and purpose, a review of DAR and DOBOR rules and regulations, natural history of marine resources in the area, and an overview of observation and incident reporting as part of the Makai Watch program.  It will conclude with example scenarios of real-life situations from the field.

The workshop will be held in the Hokuloa Church, 69-1600 Puakō Beach Drive from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday June 11, 2016.  All are welcome to participate in this training, we hope to see you there!

Hawaii State Boating Division to Require Notarized Bill of Sale for Transfer of Vessel Registration

Beginning on July 1, 2016, all vessel registration transfers in the State of Hawai‘i will require a notarized bill of sale to be presented to registering agency the Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR).

VesselRegistration.indd

Presently, DOBOR needs to match a vessel owner’s signature on record with the signature on a bill of sale in order to approve a vessel registration transfer.  This method can be inaccurate since an individual ‘s official signature may change over time. It also puts a burden on the buyer if DOBOR staff cannot authenticate a signature on a bill of sale.  If that should happen the transfer request would be denied and the buyer would have to go through the process of securing a notarized bill of sale.

Often, the seller of a vessel will have changed residence or may have left the state and cannot be contacted, causing a lengthy delay in the transfer process.

“This new requirement will help DLNR provide better customer service to boaters. It helps us promise for the vast majority of our customers that transfers won’t be declined or delayed,” said Suzanne Case, DLNR Director,

On average between 2,200-2,600 transactions per year are registered annually in the state. Notarized bills of sale will not only reduce work for the vessel owners and DOBOR.  They will allow for more secure vessel registration transfers.

State boating administrator Ed Underwood adds, “We are also concerned about preventing vessel theft through fraudulent bills of sale. It is rare for DOBOR to encounter forged signatures, but it has happened several times over the last few years.”

A standardized bill of sale form is already available that includes a section for a notary’s signature. That form can be accessed at http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dobor/forms/ on the DOBOR web site.

Even if a bill of sale is not executed using the official DOBOR form it will still be accepted at the time of transfer, so long as the signature of the seller on the bill of sale is notarized.

For further information, boaters may contact Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR) Vessel Registration at 808-587-1970.

Island Air Hires 22 Employees for New Service to Kona – Daily Service Starts June 14th

Island Air announced it has hired 22 employees to accommodate its new daily service to Kona International Airport starting Tuesday, June 14.

“We are proud to introduce our new Kona team members who are dedicated to providing outstanding customer service and ensuring passengers have the best interisland travel experience,” said David Uchiyama, Island Air’s president and chief executive officer. “We are excited to welcome these 22 individuals to the Island Air ‘ohana as we prepare to launch daily Kona service.”

The new team members, which include former Island Air employees, were recruited through job fairs and other outreach efforts to fill positions that include customer service agents, ramp agents and station manager. The Kona employees have been undergoing extensive training for the past two months.

Shardae Kaupu Lopez

Shardae Kaupu Lopez

Shardae Kaupu Lopez, who is from Miloliʻi and started working for Island Air in 2012, will serve as the Kona station manager and will oversee the airline’s operations at the Kona Airport.

Island Air Team

Other members of Island Air’s Kona team include:

Customer Service Agents:
Makamae Kaeo-Koanui, Melissa Nunes, Dominique Ghandour, Michael Corbitt, Roger Grissom-Miller, Zachary Andrade, Pauline Carmichael-Shopay, Keiko Kanada, Gae Mitsuda, Sharon Harada and Tammy Awai

Ramp Agents:
Tavita Laasaga, Douglas Vallente Jr., Greg Nation, Terry Robso, RJ Sullivan, Stan Kaneo, Maile Comilla, Kelly Bennet, Chad Kalele and Garyn Akima

Island Air will launch service to Kona on June 14 with five daily round-trip flights between Honolulu and Kona, with connecting flights to Kahului and Līhu‘e. Island Air’s check-in counter at Kona International Airport will be located in Terminal 1, and flights will depart from and arrive at Gate 5.

New Findings Show Promising Trends in Hawaii Student Health Behaviors

Today the Hawaii State Department of Health, Department of Education (HIDOE), and University of Hawaii released high school data from the 2015 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the state and all four counties. The YRBS is a bi-annual survey that regularly monitors the health risk behaviors of public, non-charter school students statewide. Over 12,000 Hawaii students in grades 6 through 12 participated in the 2015 survey.

Click to see results

Click to see results

Topics covered in the survey include unintentional injuries and violence; tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; sexual behaviors that contribute to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection; unhealthy dietary behaviors; and physical inactivity. The survey also monitors the percentages of students affected by obesity and asthma.

“The results reflect our recent initiatives to raise the bar at all levels in education,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “The downward trend of students engaging in risky behaviors and an increase in healthy choices is testament to the work done by our schools and the commitment of our students to strive higher.”

The 2015 YRBS results show trends towards less-risky behaviors in many important areas, and highlight needed improvements in others:

Physical fighting continues to decline, with 15 percent of high school students reporting that they were in a fight at least once during the 12 months before the survey. Bullying has stayed relatively steady, with 1 in 5 high school students reporting that they were bullied on school property during the same time period.

Consistent with objectives outlined in the State’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Plan, many YRBS indicators suggest an increase in youth behaviors that support healthy lifestyles. Only 13 percent of high school students report drinking at least one can, bottle, or glass of soda or pop at least once per day, compared to 23 percent in 2007. The survey does not cover drinking other types of beverages with added sugar such as sports drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks (other than 100 percent fruit juice) or sweetened tea and coffee. The proportion of high school students meeting physical activity recommendations remains steady, with 20 percent achieving the national recommendation of at least 60 minutes per day on each of the seven days before the survey. However, sedentary time continues to increase, with 2 in 5 high school students spending three hours or more per day playing video games or using a computer for non-school purposes.

Alcohol use has declined among Hawaii’s youth, with 1 in 4 high school students reporting that they drank alcohol within the 30 days before the survey. Similarly, we continue to see steady declines in smoking; 90 percent of Hawaii’s high school students do not smoke cigarettes. However, many have tried using electronic smoking devices, with 1 in 4 reporting that they currently use electronic smoking devices.

“This data shows that we are improving as a state in many areas,” said Director of Health Virginia Pressler. “However, the sharp rise in the use of electronic cigarettes reminds us of the importance of continually monitoring student behavior. We will continue to work in partnership with HIDOE to ensure that our programs and interventions target these emerging issues.”

One area that remains a concern is adolescent mental health. In 2015, 29.5 percent of high school students reported feeling sad or hopeless almost every day for two or more weeks in a row at least once in their lifetime. Rates of attempted suicide over the past 12 months has steadily decreased since 1993, but remain unacceptably high at 11 percent.

Survey procedures protect students’ privacy by allowing for anonymous and voluntary participation. The data is gathered from students in public high schools across the State of Hawaii. In a change from the previous years’ survey administration, parents were offered the opportunity to “opt-out,” rather than requiring a form to “opt-in” to the process. This resulted in a 30 to 40 percent increase in response rate, providing a more comprehensive picture of student behavior across the state and all four counties.

The Hawaii YRBS is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National YRBS survey results were also released today by CDC. For a comparison of Hawaii’s data to national rates, please visit http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Default.aspx.

For more information on the Hawaii YRBS, visit http://apps.hidoe.k12.hi.us/research/Pages/YRBS.aspx.

The full survey report, including more detailed data reports by county, gender, grade and race/ethnicity, and the survey questionnaires are available at the www.hawaiihealthmatters.org.

June 27th Lava Flow May Have Stopped – New Mobile Camera Deployed

Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake remains relatively high, its level fluctuating slightly with changes in summit pressure. At Puʻu ʻŌʻō, only the lava flow advancing southeast appears to be active. The June 27th lava flow may have stopped. No Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows currently pose a threat to nearby communities.

An HVO overflight yesterday found no active surface lava on the June 27th flow field north of the East Rift Zone, though some small breakouts may have been overlooked. HVO scientists will continue to watch this area over the coming days – the more time that passes without active lava in this part of the flow field, the more likely it is that the supply of fresh lava to the June 27th flow has ceased.

Only the pāhoehoe lava flow that emerged from the east flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on May 24 was active yesterday, and it continues to advance southeast. The flow was 2.7 km (1.7 mi) long yesterday afternoon, meaning it has made it roughly half way to the top of Pūlama pali.

An HVO webcam has been deployed to monitor the flow (Mobile Cam 3, on HVO’s website).

This image is from a research camera positioned on the southeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking toward the active flow advancing to the southeast. The breakout point is at the left edge of the image, and the mid-field skyline at the right is roughly coincident with the top of the pali.

This image is from a research camera positioned on the southeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking toward the active flow advancing to the southeast. The breakout point is at the left edge of the image, and the mid-field skyline at the right is roughly coincident with the top of the pali.