Hawaii Attorney General Charges Eight Sex Offenders with Violating Registration Requirements

Attorney General Doug Chin announced that the Department of the Attorney General has charged eight sex offenders with Failure to Comply with Covered Offender Registration Requirements in the last three months. Most recently the Department has charged Randy Maunakea, Justin Jumawan, Mose Tauaefa, and Thomas Carreira.

Maunakea was charged on May 5, 2016 with four counts of Failure to Comply with Covered Offender Registration Requirements. He was previously convicted of four counts of Sexual Assault in the Second Degree on May 5, 2003. Maunakea failed to personally appear before the chief of police within 30 days of his birthday in 2014, 2015 and 2016, as required by law. Additionally, Maunakea failed to report a change of his address within three working days of the change. A bench warrant in the amount of $10,000 in the aggregate was issued against Mr. Maunakea and is currently outstanding.

Tauaefa was charged on May 6, 2016 with two counts of Failure to Comply with Covered Offender Registration Requirements. He was previously convicted of seven counts of Sexual Assault in the Third Degree on October 6, 2000. He failed to report a change of his address within three working days of the change and additionally signed a statement verifying that his registration information was accurate and current when the registration information was not substantially accurate and current. A bench warrant in the amount of $10,000 in the aggregate was issued against Tauaefa and is currently outstanding.

Carreira was charged on May 13, 2016 with two counts of Failure to Comply with Covered Offender Registration Requirements. He was previously convicted of Sexual Assault in the Third Degree in 1994. He also has two convictions for Abuse of Family/Household Member two convictions for Burglary in the First Degree, and convictions for Theft in the Third Degree and Theft in the Fourth Degree. Additionally, he has ten arrests for Contempt of Court. Carreira had a pending felony case for Failure to Comply with Registration Requirements and was granted supervised release and required to reside at the Institute for Human Services (“IHS”) as a condition of his release. He left IHS without updating registration information and failed to report in person for his quarterly periodic verification during the first week of January, 2015. Defendant has since be re-incarcerated for violating the terms and conditions of his supervised release and awaiting sentencing.

Jumawan was charged on May 23, 2016 with two counts of Failure to Comply with Covered Offender Registration Requirements. He was previously convicted of Sexual Assault in the Second Degree and Sexual Assault in the Third Degree on October 31, 2007 and is still on probation. He moved from his registered address on February 19, 2016 without notifying the Hawaii Criminal Justice Data Center within three days of the change, as required by law. Because he has failed to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation, a $20,000 bench warrant has been issued for his arrest. He has not yet been served and his whereabouts are unknown at this time.

The other charged defendants are Steven Young (charged with two counts on March 21, 2016), Justin Gonda (charged with one count on April 1, 2016), Damon Hookano (charged with two counts on April 22, 2016), and Dean Barbadillo (charged with three counts on April 22, 2016). The charges against the eight defendants are brought under section 846E-9(a) of the Hawaii Revised Statutes (HRS). A conviction for these charges is a class C felony that carries with it a sentence of up to 5 years imprisonment, pursuant to HRS section 706-660. The minimum term of imprisonment shall be set by the Hawaii Paroling Authority, pursuant to HRS section 706-669.

All eight defendants are presumed innocent unless and until they are found guilty of the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

Click to search for sex offenders.

Click to search for sex offenders.

Attorney General Chin reminds the public that they can view an online directory of Hawaii registered sex offenders and other covered offenders, and sign-up for email alerts through the Department’s award-winning “Hawaii Sex Offender Search” mobile app. Those without a mobile device can also view an online directory of Hawaii registered sex offenders and other covered offenders, and sign up for email alerts at http://sexoffenders.ehawaii.gov.

Use of Video Decision Aids Increases Advance Care Planning in Hilo

Pilot study part of statewide program to improve end-of-life care

A program encouraging physicians and other providers to discuss with patients their preferences regarding end-of-life care significantly increased the documented incidence of such conversations and the number of patients with late-stage disease who were discharged to hospice.

Filling in an advance health care directive

In a Journal of General Internal Medicine paper that has been released online, a team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators describes the pilot program, which is part of a larger initiative to transform medical care for serious illness in the state of Hawaii. The program included video decision aids in 10 languages and was carried out in the city of Hilo, Hawaii.

“By collaborating with the people of Hawaii and recognizing the diversity of the community, we were able to honor and respect patients’ individual choices when it came to medical care,” says Angelo Volandes, MD, MPH, of the MGH Department of Medicine, lead author of the report. “Doctors are often uncomfortable having end-of-life conversations and have rarely been trained in advance care planning. The videos can be a valuable supplement to, not a replacement for, the doctor-patient relationship.”

Advance care planning – conversations with patients regarding the type of care they would like to receive, or not receive, if they become seriously or terminally ill and cannot speak for themselves – has been the subject of considerable attention in recent years. Earlier this year Medicare began reimbursing clinicians for advance care planning discussions with patients, and the process was mentioned in, but not funded by, the Affordable Care Act. But there have been few studies examining the impact of advance care planning efforts on medical documentation of such conversations, on the care actually delivered or on costs.

A broad coalition of stakeholders, led by Hawaii Medical Service Association (HMSA), an independent Blue Cross/Blue Shield licensee, has been working since 2012 to improve advance care planning rates statewide through innovative collaborations, including implementation of educational videos. Hilo Medical Center, a 276-bed hospital, was the first in the state to make advance care planning the standard of care for patients, and the JGIM paper reports on the first 21 months of the program’s implementation in the city of more than 43,000.

Beginning in early 2013, Hilo Medical Center clinicians, Hospice of Hilo staff and 30 primary care physicians in the city were offered a one- to four-hour training program and access to advance care planning video decision aids in English, Japanese, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Samoan, Korean, Ilocano, Tagalog, Spanish and Marshallese. Less than 10 minutes long, the videos are designed to be accessible to general audiences and include broad questions that patients should consider regarding their individual preferences and how they could affect future medical interventions. How or whether providers used the videos in subsequent advance care planning discussions was neither required nor tracked.

The primary study outcome for Hilo Medical Center was any change in the rate at which advance care planning conversations were documented in medical records of patients with late-stage disease. For outpatient care, any difference between the rates of advance care planning in Hilo and in a control group of similar Hawaii communities was analyzed. The researchers also compared the number of hospice admissions for late-stage patients before and after the program was implemented – compared with the control communities – as well as the rate of in-hospital deaths. Any impact on health costs was determined by analyzing HMSA claims data.

Prior to implementation of the training program, the rate of advance care planning documentation for late-stage patients at Hilo Medical Center was 3.2 percent, but during the 21 months after training was offered, the rate increased to almost 40 percent. Among almost 4,000 HMSA patients over age 75 in Hilo who saw a primary care physician during 2014, the year following primary care physician training, 37 percent received advance care planning, compared with 25.6 percent in the control communities.

The percentage of late-stage Hilo Medical Center patients who were discharged to hospice, which was 5.7 percent before the training, rose to 13.8 percent. Overall Hospice of Hilo admissions increased 28 percent in 2013 and 51 percent in 2014, compared with 2012. While average HMSA reimbursements for care during the last month of life increased from 2012 to 2013 in both Hilo and the control area, the increase for Hilo was only 5.5 percent, compared with more than 22 percent in the control area, reflecting an average per-patient savings of $3,458 for the last month of life.

Although this study was conducted in a relatively small region, the authors note that the diversity of the Hawaiian population may offset that limitation. The program has now expanded to all hospitals in Hawaii, 10 hospices, military facilities and many other providers; and Volandes expresses the hope that this study’s results will renew calls for continuing innovation in advance care planning, including certification and reimbursement for patient decision aids.

“Advance care planning videos and other decision aids offer cost-efficient and broadly applicable methods of placing patients at the center of their care,” he says. “They also allow doctors and other health providers to have critical conversations with patients that were rarely encouraged during their training. Making these decision aids widely available could be a real health care game-changer.”

UH Hilo Announces 2015-16 Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Awards

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Campus Center Leadership Program recently presented Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Recognition awards and certificates to individuals and student organizations for their contributions to UH Hilo and the community during the 2015-2016 school year.
UHHilo

The Ka Lama Ku Umeke Awards and a Ka Lama Ku Award Plaque were presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate of Leadership: Destiny Rodriguez
• ˋIke Pāpālua Certificate of Leadership To Have the Gift of Vision: Mya Yee Nandar
• Laulima Award – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: Rose Hart
• Mālama Award – Taking Care of Others & Community: Serena Massrey
• Mālama ˋOhana Award – Taking Care of Our Families: Lauryn P. Mow
• Ka Lama Ku Recognition Plaque: Matthew Groulx

The Ka Lama Ku Leadership Plaque recognized student organizations for contributions to UH Hilo and Hawai’i Island communities:

• Alakai Award Plaque: The Pacific Youth Empowerment Day Team (Theresa Kimnoy Aten, Sinforsa Suzie Lippwe, Sione Lam Yuen Jr., Felicia Andrew, Axel Defngin, Bill Kennedy Yang, Lashay Masami, Jacob Kom, Elaine Chugen and Cheryll Ligohr

• ˋIke Pāpālua Award Plaque – To Have the Gift of Vision.: The Pacific Students Media Team (Calvin Myazoe ( Marshallese), Erbiland Mandira (Marshallese) Kathleen Gikbay (Yapese), Axel Defngin (Yapese), Bill Kennedy Yang (Kosraen/Pohnpeian), Vester Robester (Yapese/Pohnpeian) and Peter P Ramofolo (Solomon Islander)

• Kuleana Award Plaque – We are Accountable & Responsible: The Psychology and Kinesiology & Exercise Science Peer Advising Team (Alia Alvarez, Salamasina Aumua, Henry Blake, Bree Kalima, Keirsa Pakani-Tsukiyama, Nicole Rascon, Bailey Rodriguez, Keian Shon, Bennjamin Siemers and Ashley Winslow)

• Mālama Award Plaque – Taking Care of Others and Community: The Kanilehua Living Learning Community Peer Mentors/Tutors ( Bronson Palupe, Austin Awana, Abcde Zoller and Ashlen Kinilau)

The Certificate of Leadership was presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate – Leadership: Kailey Lapenia
• Kuleana Certificate – We are Accountable & Responsible: Bree Kalima
• Laulima Certificate – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: The UH Hilo Graduate Student Council (Heather Kimball, Deborah Michiko Fried, Samuel Kamu Plunkett and Summer Danner)
• Mālama ‘Āina Certificate – Taking Care of the Land and Environment: Kiana Soloria
• Mālama ‘Ohana Certificate – Taking Care of our Families: Koa Rodrigues

The Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Program is sponsored by the UH Hilo Campus Center Fee Board, the Student Advisory Council, and Student Activities Council.

Puna Lawmakers to Hold Town Hall Meeting

Rep. Joy San Buenaventura (Puna) and Sen. Russell Ruderman (Puna, Ka‘u) will host a community Town Hall Meeting on Thursday, June 9, 2016 at the Pahoa Community Center on Hawaii Island to talk about and provide a wrap up of the 2016 legislative session.

Medical MarijuanaAt the Town Hall Meeting they will also discuss the future of Medical Marijuana Dispensaries in the islands.

Residents are encouraged to attend to ask questions, voice their opinions and present suggestions to address community concerns.

WHO:  Representative Joy San Buenaventura (Puna) and Senator Russell Ruderman (Puna, Ka‘u)

WHAT:  Town Hall Meeting to discuss the 2016 legislative session and the future of medical marijuana dispensaries

WHEN: Thursday, June 9, 2016,  5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

WHERE:  Pahoa Community Center, 15-2910 Puna Road

Planned Parenthood Launches Online Access to Birth Control in Hawaii

Today, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands (PPGNHI) officially announced the launch of Planned Parenthood Care in Hawaii.

Birth Control ApThe app allows people to talk to a Planned Parenthood provider online and face-to-face through a secure video consultation system, and then receive birth control in the mail. Consultation for urinary tract infections is also available. This mobile app will bring reproductive health care services directly to women and men across the state.

“Planned Parenthood Care provides the same high-quality health care people have trusted Planned Parenthood to provide in Hawaii for 50 years.  What’s new is now our clinicians can literally meet people where they are—wherever they are—to get them the care they need,” said Chris Charbonneau, CEO of PPGNHI. “Telehealth is an incredible tool in expanding access to care. We know that life gets busy and that is why we are proud to lead with this technology that allows us to deliver health care and information to people who need it, regardless of their location.”

PPGNHI launched Planned Parenthood Care in Washington state in 2014 and in both Alaska and Idaho in 2015. Planned Parenthood Care™ builds upon decades of innovative health care and information delivery from Planned Parenthood and its affiliates nationwide. Planned Parenthood’s websites provide accurate, nonjudgmental information about contraception, sex, and reproductive health to 60 million visitors each year. Planned Parenthood’s Chat/Text program, which has served nearly 577,000 users so far, has been successful in reducing worry around sexual health issues by connecting youth to a real person through their computer or phone in real time.

“Hawaii is uniquely positioned to benefit from this service given the geography of this great state and the limited access to local health centers,” said Sonia Blackiston, Hawaii Education Manager at PPGNHI. “This app allows people to consult with a physician in real time via video on their device and determine what makes the most sense for them. It provides convenient access to Planned Parenthood’s trusted, high quality health care.”

The app is available at the iOS app store or from Google Play, but at present health care can only be delivered through Planned Parenthood Care to residents of Hawaii, Alaska, Idaho, Washington, and Minnesota.