DBEDT Releases Report on Non-English Speaking Population in Hawaii

The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) released a report today that examines the non-English speaking population in Hawaii based on data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau from 2010 to 2014.  The department’s Research and Economic Analysis Division created the report.

Click to read the report

Click to read the report

The “Non-English Speaking Population in Hawaii” report looks at residents aged 5 and older, who can speak a language other than English.  The report shows 17.9 percent of the population are foreign born, and speak more than 130 languages. About one in four Hawaii residents speak a language other than English at home, which is higher than the U.S. average of 21 percent. The data shows 12.4 percent of the state’s population speak English less than “very well,” which is much higher than the U.S. average of 8.6 percent.

Some of the findings in the report include the following:

  • Non-English language speaking at home was more prevalent in Honolulu County than in the neighbor island counties.  The proportion of non-English speakers was highest in Honolulu County at 28 percent and lowest in Hawaii County at 19 percent.
  • Ilocano, Tagalog, and Japanese were the top three most common non-English languages spoken at home in Hawaii.  Speakers of these three languages made up about half of non-English speakers at home in Hawaii.
  • English proficiency of the non-English speaking population varied substantially by language.  Among the top 10 most common non-English languages spoken at home in Hawaii, the German speaking population had the highest English proficiency with 84 percent of them speaking English “very well,” followed by the Hawaiian speaking population at 82 percent.  The proportion of fluent English speakers was relatively low among Korean, Vietnamese, Chinese and Ilocano speaking population, with less than 40 percent of them speaking English “very well.”
  • Compared with the adult population, the proportion of non-English speakers was lower and English proficiency was better in the 5 to 17 school-age children group. The popular language spoken by the school-age children were also different.  The share of Hawaiian speakers was noticeably bigger in the school-age children group than in the adult group.
  • The most distinctive characteristic of the non-English speaking population from the English-only speaking population was their nativity.  Of the non-English speakers at home, 63 percent in Hawaii were foreign born.  Compared with the English-only speaking population, the non-English speakers in Hawaii had a gender structure with more female population, and an age distribution with higher shares of older age groups.  The overall educational attainments of the non-English speakers were lower than that of the English-only speakers.
  • English proficiency had strong impacts on an individual’s economic activities. Labor force participation rate of the non-English speakers, who could not speak English well was about 15 percentage points lower than the rates for the English-only speakers and the non-English speakers who could speak English well. The rate difference with these groups was bigger at 33 percentage points for the non-English speakers who could not speak English at all.
  • English proficiency also played an important role in the selection of occupation. The occupational composition of the non-English speakers who could not speak English well showed a high concentration in two occupation groups: “Food preparation and serving” and “building/grounds cleaning and maintenance”. About one in two non-English speakers worked in one of these two occupations if they could not speak English well.
  • Earning disparities among various English proficiency groups were evident.  The median earnings of the non-English speakers were lower than that of the English-only speaking population for all English proficiency levels, and the earnings gap amplified as English proficiency decreased.

The full report is available at: dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/reports_studies/non-english-speaking-population-in-hawaii/.

Maps on the non-English speaking population in Hawaii are available on this page by Census Designated Place and by Census Tract (based on the 2010-2014 American Community Survey 5 year data).

New Federal Education Law Prompts Governor to Form Team to Develop Blueprint for Hawaii’s Education

Gov. David Ige today announced the formation of the Governor’s Team on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The new law calls for the most significant reduction in federal authority over public education in decades. The law returns authority to the 50 states to set the direction for their own public schools.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act. President Obama signs the Every Student Succeeds Act into law on December 10, 2015.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
President Obama signs the Every Student Succeeds Act into law on December 10, 2015.

The governor’s team will work to develop a blue print for Hawai‘i’s public schools that is consistent with ESSA and will maximize opportunities and possibilities for Hawai‘i to transform education.

Gov. Ige has appointed Darrel Galera as chairman of the Governor’s ESSA team and is in the process of appointing 16 additional members representing all stakeholders in public education.

Under the new education law, Gov. Ige will be involved in the development of the new state education plan and will have final approval over the plan.

“This is a major opportunity to change the face of public education in Hawai‘i for the better. Our innovation economy depends on a well-educated workforce to meet the state’s goals in renewable energy, locally grown food production, environmental stewardship and more. It is my hope that the public will participate in this process to help our education system prepare students for high-skill careers in the 21st century,” said Gov. Ige.

The ESSA team will ultimately be responsible for assessing the current public school system and identifying areas of need.

An Education Summit will be scheduled this summer to give organizations and individuals the opportunity to discuss possibilities for a future-focused education system and solicit input on key recommendations to the state’s ESSA plan.

Town hall meetings will also be scheduled to share information with the public and to collect public input for the ESSA plan.

To apply to serve on the Governor’s ESSA Team, go to: https://forms.ehawaii.gov/pages/board-survey/

Deadline for applications is April 22, 2016.

Island Air Adds Kona Service

Island Air today announced it plans to offer interisland air service to Hawai‘i Island with five daily round-trip flights between Honolulu and Kona, starting June 14, subject to government approval. The airline’s expansion of service to Kona will offer increased seat availability and more interisland travel flight options for local residents and visitors, as well as create job opportunities in West Hawai‘i.

Mayor Kenoi said " "In a state of islands, air travel is not a nicety – it is a necessity to our economy and to our people. Because of this, our administration has long been advocating for increased airlift to Hawai’i Island. We welcome Island Air’s return to Kona, offering another option for our local families and our visitors."

Mayor Kenoi said “In a state of islands, air travel is not a nicety – it is a necessity to our economy and to our people. Because of this, our administration has long been advocating for increased airlift to Hawai’i Island. We welcome Island Air’s return to Kona, offering another option for our local families and our visitors.”

“Both the community and our travel industry partners have reached out to us asking for more support for the West Hawai‘i community,” said Les Murashige, Island Air’s president and CEO. “As we continue to improve our operations and expand our presence in the community, Island Air is proud to once again serve Hawai‘i Island and provide service to support Hawai‘i’s families, local businesses and our visitors so that all may enjoy our Island way.”

Island Air is celebrating its new service to Kona by offering an introductory fare sale from April 14 through April 20, 2016. The special introductory fare for a one-way flight between Honolulu and Kona will start from $69* for travel between June 14 and Sept. 30, 2016. Reservations can be made online at www.islandair.com or by calling (800) 652-6541.

In addition to providing increased seat capacity, Island Air’s Kona service is expected to create approximately 25 airport-related jobs in West Hawai‘i, including customer service agents, ramp agents and station manager.

Island Air’s check-in ticket counter will be located in Terminal 1 and arrivals/departures will be out of Gate 5 at Kona International Airport.

*Subject to availability. Fare includes one (1) federal transportation segment tax and one (1) security fee. Other taxes, fees, and restrictions may apply.

ABOUT ISLAND AIR:

Island Air is the value-leader in the Hawaiian Islands, offering 238 convenient flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island. The affordable alternative for interisland travel, Island Air’s 64-seat ATR-72 aircraft are able to provide captivating up-close views of Hawai‘i’s remarkable landscapes. Founded in 1980 as Princeville Airways, the company was renamed Island Air in 1992 and has been proudly serving the islands of Hawai‘i for more than 35 years.

For more information about Island Air, visit www.islandair.com or call (800) 652-6541. Let us know how we are doing on Yelp or TripAdvisor or just stay connected by liking Island Air on Facebook at www.facebook.com/islandairhawaii, or follow @IslandAirHawaii on Twitter and @IslandAir_Hawaii on Instagram.

 

2015-2016 American Family Insurance ALL-USA Hawaii Girls Basketball Team Announced

USA TODAY High School Sports is proud to announce the 2015-16 American Family Insurance ALL-USA Hawaii Girls Basketball Team. Players were selected based on their athletic achievements from the 2015-16 season.

For the complete list of American Family Insurance ALL-USA state teams, click here.

COACH OF THE YEAR

Bobbie Awa, Konawaena (Kealakekua)
The Big Island Interscholastic Federation Coach of the Year, Awa guided Konawaena to its second straight state title and the seventh overall during her tenure. The Wildcats finished the year 26-1 and were undefeated against Hawaii competition.

FIRST TEAM

Player of the Year
Chanelle Molina, G, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-7, Sr.

Chanelle Molina

Chanelle Molina

A three-time Gatorade Hawaii Girls Basketball Player of the Year and four-time Big Island Interscholastic Federation Player of the Year, Molina earned Most Outstanding Player of the tournament honors after leading Konawaena (26-1) to its second straight Division I championship. She scored 24 points in the state final and averaged 19 points, eight rebounds and 7.6 assists for the year. Molina has signed to play at Washington State this fall.

Cherilyn Molina, G, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-3, So.
The younger Molina sister averaged 16.2 points, 5.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in helping Konawaena to a state championship.

Naai Solomon-Lewis, C, Kohala (Kapaau), 5-8, Sr.
Solomon-Lewis averaged 14.3 ppg and was named Most Outstanding Player of the Div. II tournament, despite falling in the semifinals—when she grabbed 16 rebounds and scored 14 points.

Keala Quinlan, G, Roosevelt (Honolulu), 6-0, Sr.
A University of Portland signee, Quinlan averaged 19.6 points per game to lead Roosevelt to the first round of the Division I state tournament.

Keleah-Aiko Koloi, F, Lahainaluna (Lahaina), 5-11, Sr.
Koloi averaged 16.3 points per game for a Lahainaluna team that advanced to the Division I semifinals.

SECOND TEAM

Ihi Victor, F, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-10, Sr.

Cameron Fernandez, F/G, Lahainaluna (Lahaina), 5-8, Sr.

Tyra Moe, F, Punahou (Honolulu), 6-1, Sr.

Roselynn Shimaoka, G, Kaiser (Honolulu), 5-6, Sr.

Ally Wada, G/F, Hawaii Baptist (Honolulu), 5-8, So.