Bob May Golf Academy Returns to Waikoloa Beach Resort

For the third year in a row, noted golf instructor Bob May will bring his Golf Academy to Waikoloa Beach Resort. From June 6-July 5, 2016, island golfers and visitors will have a chance to learn from the man who “schooled” Tiger Woods in the 2000 PGA Championship in Valhalla.

Bob May

Bob May

Bob May pushed Tiger Woods to the limit in a three-hole playoff that ultimately went to Woods, but the golf world never forgot.  Today, with over twenty years on the PGA Tour, extensive teaching experience and a solid focus under pressure, May’s approach includes both the physical and mental game, for high-handicap players as well as juniors. From fundamentals to finesse, his instruction is inspired by and emphasizes the importance of what he calls “a passion for the game.”

Growing up in California, May’s passion for golf started when he was a boy, and he played his first tournament at age 8. He attended Oklahoma State University, and as an Amateur, chalked up an impressive list of tourney wins and golf awards, including Sports Illustrated Player of the Year, three times NCAA All American, and a #5 U.S. ranking by Titleist and Golf Week Publications.

In 1991, he was a finalist in the British Amateur, and—with Walker Cup teammates Phil Mickelson and David Duval—defeated the European team. That same year, May turned pro, playing competitively on the PGA Tour and Nationwide Tour (now the Web.com Tour) for over 20 years, winning the British Masters in 1999, achieving four second-place titles on the Web.com Tour and three on the PGA Tour, including the unforgettable match with Tiger Woods.

The Bob May Golf Academy at Waikoloa Beach Resort will offer private lessons for adults, juniors and couples, as well as “Trackman” performance analysis. For more information and to book teaching time, visit www.BobMayGolfAcademy.com.

Waikoloa Beach Resort Golf inspires the spirit of adventure in every golfer, with two epic golf courses along Hawai‘i Island’s rugged lava coast: the dramatic, tropical Beach Course, designed by Robert Trent Jones, Jr., and the Kings’ Course, designed in a classic Scottish links style by the winning team of Tom Weiskopf and Jay Morrish. Spectacular, historic and compelling, the Beach Course and Kings’ Course challenge the champion and inspire new players every day.

For more information, contact the Kings’ Course at (808) 886-5375

Coast Guard to Temporarily Move Navigation Aids Near Hilo Harbor to Assist with Dredging of Harbor

The Coast Guard began temporarily moving aids to navigation in Hilo Harbor, Hawai’i, Sunday, to assist the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with planned dredging operations.
Harbor BuoysAs previously released, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ hopper dredge Essayons will conduct maintenance dredging in March and April starting in Nawiliwili last week, and then at Kalaeloa (Barbers Point), Hilo, Kahului, and Honolulu harbors. Mariners should NOT rely on the aids to navigation that are relocated.

Mariners entering or departing Hilo Harbor during this time period are encouraged to contact the Essayons to determine the location of dredging operations and coordinate passing arrangements. Mariners should transit at their slowest safe speed to minimize wake when in the vicinity of the dredge and proceed with caution after passing arrangements have been made.

All waterway users should transit with caution when in the vicinity of the dredging vessel and operate at a safe speed when the potential for hazards such as dredging components are present. During operations near Barbers Point no aids will need to be moved but mariners should exercise caution around dredging operations.

The following buoys will be temporarily relocated starting March 27, 2016 through April 11, 2016. These dates may vary due to unforeseen on-site conditions, weather and other factors. See attached graphic.

Hilo Harbor Buoy 6 (LLNR 28080) relocated in approximate position 19-43-51.80N/ 155- 03-51.00W in 12ft of water.

Hilo Harbor Buoy 7 (LLNR 28085) relocated in approximate position 19-44-06.62N/ 155- 03-40.04W in 12ft of water.

Hilo Harbor Lighted Buoy 9 (LLNR 28105) relocated in approximate position 19-44- 05.10N/ 155-03-28.00W in 12ft of water.

Hilo Harbor Lighted Buoy 10 (LLNR 28110) relocated in approximate position 19-43- 44.95N/ 155-03-29.77W in 10ft of water.

Again, the relocated buoys may be in shoal water and should NOT be used for navigation.

General safety information regarding operating in the vicinity of dredging vessels can be found in Coast Guard Marine Safety Alert 14-15. This safety alert and other information about the 2016 Maintenance Dredge Project can be found on the Sector Honolulu homeport website www.homeport.uscg.mil/Honolulu under the Waterways Management page and Hawaii Commercial Harbor 2016 Maintenance Dredging tab.

Hawaii is a maritime state over 2,400 miles from the mainland and far more dependent on its harbors than most of the United States. The Hawaii state DOT claims that over 80 percent of all consumer goods – food, clothing, autos, building supplies, machinery, paper, and allied products, medical supplies, and agricultural materials – are imported into the state. Of that 80 percent, approximately 98 percent enters Hawaii though commercial harbors on the major islands.

To ensure that these vital goods continue to arrive safely in Hawaii, the Essayons crew will dredge approximately 290,000 cubic yards from the five key harbors. The dredge-material will be safely disposed of at EPA-designated ocean disposal sites.

For questions about the dredging operations specifically please contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Honolulu District Public Affairs office at CEPOH-PA@usace.army.mil or 808-835-4004.

Hawaii Department of Health Investigates Travel Related Cases of Mosquito Borne Illnesses on Oahu

The Hawaii State Department of Health is investigating four cases of travel related mosquito borne viruses on Oahu. The cases include an individual who traveled to Latin America, returned ill, and is being tested for dengue and Zika virus, as well as individuals who are being tested for dengue fever and chikungunya and have a history of travel to the Pacific Islands and Latin America. All of the individuals have recovered.

Mosquito Bite

Initial lab tests for the first individual referenced above conducted by the State Laboratories Division were not conclusive, and further testing will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The department’s Vector Control teams have been assessing residential and other areas in urban Honolulu and along the North Shore this week to determine if mosquito control measure such as eliminating mosquito breeding sites or spraying to reduce adult mosquitos activity will be necessary.

Dengue fever, Zika, and chikungunya are all mosquito borne viruses that are spread when a sick person is bitten by a mosquito, which later bites another person. Evidence suggests that Zika can also be transmitted through unprotected sexual contact with someone who has been infected. The best way to prevent all these viruses is to take mosquito control measures and to avoid getting bitten. Some who carry Zika do not show symptoms, and in others, illness may last from several days to over a week. There is currently no cure for these viruses.

“The department expects to see more of these travel related cases as outbreaks of all these diseases continue in other countries,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “The department is working closely with the counties and taking precautionary measures to respond to all suspected and confirmed cases. We ask for the public’s help in reducing mosquito breeding areas around homes and workplaces and preventing mosquito bites by using repellant or protective clothing.”

Department of Health staff will continue to conduct site visits in various areas on Oahu in the coming week to assess problem areas for mosquito breeding and inform residents of the need to take precautions against mosquito-borne viruses. Residents who are not at home when a Vector Control team visits their neighborhood will receive a flyer or letter from the Department of Health and are advised to read the information carefully.

The public is advised that anyone who has traveled outside the country and has mild to severe symptoms such as fever, joint pain, rash, or red/pink eyes within 2 weeks after returning from travel should see their healthcare provider. All residents and visitors should avoid getting mosquito bites by using repellent and wearing light-colored clothing with long sleeves, pants, shoes and socks when outdoors. Residents should fix broken window and door screens at home, and get rid of standing water in the yard. Old tires, buckets, toys and plants, especially bromeliads, can become breeding sites for mosquitos.

For more tips on how to prevent the spread of mosquito-borne viruses, visit health.hawaii.gov.

Hawaii Residents Can Spot the International Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).

International Space Station

It will be visible beginning tonight, Monday, March 28, at 7:37 PM. It will be visible for approximately 6 minutes at a Maximum Height of 51 degrees. It will appear 10 degrees above the Southwest part of the sky and disappear 11 degrees above the North Northeast part of the sky.