Final Numbers Show Bernie Sanders Dominated Hawaii

33,716 ballots were cast today in Hawai‘i’s Presidential Preference Poll.

Hawaii Bernie

Unofficial Candidate totals are below:

Bernie Sanders            23,530 Ballots             70%

Hillary Clinton            10,125 Ballots             30%

Rocky De La Fuente          12 Ballots               0%

Martin O’Malley                  6 Ballots               0%

Uncommitted                     43 Ballots               0%

Based on those totals, 17 delegates were awarded to Sanders and 8 to Clinton.  Here are the totals by Congressional District and county.

Delegates (% of Vote)             Delegates (% of Vote)

Congressional District 1         3 Clinton (38%)          /           5 Sanders (62%)

Congressional District 2         2 Clinton (25%)          /           6 Sanders (75%)

At-Large Delegates                 2 Clinton                     /           4 Sanders

Pledge PLEO                         1 Clinton                     /           2 Sanders

 

“Today’s turnout is a real testament to the hard work and commitment of the Sanders and Clinton campaigns and the engagement of Hawai‘i Democrats in the presidential process,” said State Party Chair Stephanie Ohigashi.  “We saw turnout today reminiscent of 2008 when Hawai‘i Democrats broke all records in the contest between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton,” Ohigashi said.

“I would like to thank all of the volunteers who worked so hard to make to make today successful.  From Pahala to Kaumakani the Democratic Party volunteers and the Presidential campaign representatives demonstrated the very best of the Democratic Party of Hawai‘i.”

The official results will be certified by the Democratic Party of Hawai‘i State Central Committee within 20 days.

 

Hawaii Democratic Party Selects Bernie Sanders

The 2016 Hawaii Democratic Caucus results are in and Bernie Sanders has won the State of Hawaii.

Hawaii Bernie

Total ballots cast: 32,096.

Representing 88% of all precincts.

22,661 ballots were cast for Bernie Sanders, representing 71% of the partial results.

9,377 ballots were cast for Hillary Rodham Clinton, representing 29% of the partial results.

Rocky De La Fuente had 12 votes, Martin O’Malley had 6, and 40 were uncommitted. All counting for 0%.

The tabulating is continuing for the remaining 12%. These precincts are all on Oahu

Updated Lava Map Shows Lava Flow Still Advancing

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The area of the flow field on February 20 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow field as mapped on March 25 is shown in red. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. The black box shows the extent of the accompanying large scale maps.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface.

DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate potential flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent regional land cover map from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coastal Management draped over a 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM). The bathymetry is also from NOAA.

Because the flow field is changing very little at the moment, mapping of the lava flow is being conducted relatively infrequently. We will return to more frequent mapping if warranted by an increase in activity.

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the flow field on February 20 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow field as mapped on March 25 is shown in red.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The yellow lines show the active lava tube system. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at lower left.

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate potential flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over a 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

This map overlays a georeferenced thermal image mosaic onto the current map of the flow field near Puʻu ʻŌʻō to show the distribution of active and recently active breakouts.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The thermal images were collected during a helicopter overflight on March 25. The June 27th flow field as of March 25 is outlined in green for comparison. The yellow lines show the active lava tube system, as currently mapped. Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at lower left.

USGS Update – Lava Breakouts and Small Lobe Advancing Through Forest

Breakouts persist northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, with scattered activity along the north margin of the flow field at the forest boundary.

hvo326a

One narrow lobe of lava has pushed through forest over the past few weeks, and is 7.6 km (4.7 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. This photo looks southwest, and the front of the narrow lobe is in the foreground, with Puʻu ʻŌʻō near the top of the photo. The breakouts active at the forest boundary along the northern flow margin can be seen by their smoke plumes along the right side of the photo.

Another view, looking west, showing the activity along the forest boundary and northern flow margin.

hvo326b

Scattered breakouts were burning forest in this area. In the upper left portion of the image, Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen.

The altered and fractured rim of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater is prone to small collapses.

hvo326cPortions of the eastern crater rim, shown here, have collapsed onto the crater floor, covering the recent lava flows with rubble.

In the western portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater, there has been a small pit for nearly a year.

hvo326dThe pit is about 60 m (200 feet) wide, and a small circular lava pond resides beneath the overhanging west rim of this pit.

hvo326e

HVO geologists walk along the edge of the inner crater in Puʻu ʻŌʻō, making stops periodically to perform laser rangefinder measurements of crater dimensions.

Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake remains active

Last Saturday, March 19, marked the 8-year anniversary of the start of Kīlauea’s ongoing summit eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater.

hvo326f

Halemaʻumaʻu spans much of the width of this photo, and the small inner crater in the foreground is the Overlook crater, which contains the active lava lake. The gas plume at this time was originating from a spattering area in the southern portion of the lake, obscured by the crater wall from this angle.