New Satellite Image Shows Where Lava is at Now

This satellite image was captured on March 2 by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA’s Earth Observing 1 satellite. The image is provided courtesy of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Although this is a false-color image, the color map has been chosen to mimic what the human eye would expect to see. Bright red pixels depict areas of very high temperatures and show active lava. White areas are clouds. Black lines are roads.

An HVO geologist carefully approaches a skylight on the June 27th lava tube. The skylight provided a view into the lava tube, and revealed a swiftly moving lava stream

An HVO geologist carefully approaches a skylight on the June 27th lava tube. The skylight provided a view into the lava tube, and revealed a swiftly moving lava stream

The image shows that scattered breakouts remain active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Many of these breakouts are active along the northern flow field margin, at the forest boundary. A small portion of these flows at the forest boundary have migrated north, slightly closer to subdivisions.

Small vents in the southern portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been active recently, and erupting new lava flows onto the floor of the crater. The light-colored flow in the center of the photograph was active this morning, and slowly spreading across the crater floor.

Small vents in the southern portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been active recently, and erupting new lava flows onto the floor of the crater. The light-colored flow in the center of the photograph was active this morning, and slowly spreading across the crater floor.

The overall ground slope, however, is towards the northeast, and other recent flows that have been active in this area have all eventually migrated along the direction of the arrow on the map – maintaining a safe distance from the subdivisions towards the north.

A vent in the southern portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater contained a small lava pond and was throwing spatter a short distance. The accumulated spatter has built a small cone around the opening. A thick layer of Pele's hair covers the far side of the cone.

A vent in the southern portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater contained a small lava pond and was throwing spatter a short distance. The accumulated spatter has built a small cone around the opening. A thick layer of Pele’s hair covers the far side of the cone.

A bright thermal anomaly in Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater results from an active flow that was covering the crater floor at the time of the satellite overpass.

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