Hawaii Department of Health Statement on First Case of Zika This Year

The Hawaii State Department of Health has confirmed the first imported case of Zika in Hawaii this year. The individual had a history of travel in the Pacific and has since recovered and is no longer infectious. The case was confirmed this week by the department’s State Laboratories Division.

Mosquito sucking blood on a human hand

Mosquito sucking blood on a human hand

The department conducted an investigation of the case and has determined there is no health risk to the public.

To protect the privacy of the individual, no other information will be made available about the case.“Because people frequently travel to areas abroad where Zika virus is present, we can expect that we may see more imported cases in the coming months,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “With Zika, and our current dengue outbreak, it’s important for everyone in the state to reduce mosquito breeding areas by getting rid of standing water, and use repellant or protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites.”

The department sent an advisory to healthcare providers statewide on Feb. 17, 2016 updating them on clinical guidance for Zika virus and urging them to be aware of areas abroad where Zika virus is circulating.

In 2015, the Department of Health reported four imported cases of Zika virus in the state.

For travel guidance go to http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information For information on symptoms, diagnosis and treatment go to: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/symptoms/index.html For information on Zika and pregnancy go to: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/index.html

Hikianalia’s Upcoming Hawaii Island Events

Hikianalia, the sister ship of Hokule’a, will be coming to the Big Island soon and the public is invited to some of the upcoming Hawaii Island events.
malama honua hawaii island visit

  • Friday, March 4 – Education Engagement Day Location: All throughout West Hawaii.  Organize and pair up schools and community organizations who malama honua for community service learning or classroom visitation.  To RSVP and for more information contact: nakalaiwaa@gmail.com
  • Saturday, March 5, 8:00-10:00 a.m. – Waa Talks: Location: Pua Ka Ilima (Kawaihae Coral Flats).  Geared for educators: E Lau Hoe Waa Teacher Training Activities.  RSVP on website.
  • Saturday, March 5, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. – Malama Honua, WW Voyage Festival.  Location: Pua Ka Ilima (Kawaihae Coral flats).  This event is free and open to all families and community members. Featuring three demonstrations: Fish Surveys, Water Safety and Waa Mele & Oli
  • Wednesday, March 9, 5:00-7:00 p.m. – Waa Talks, Location: Kona – Keauhou Shopping Center. Special Guest Speaker: Celeste Hao from Imiloa Astronomy Center sharing the Kolea Waa Tool Kit, which is soon to be available to teachers.
  • Friday, March 11, 10:00-11:30 a.m. – Special Screening for schools, Location: Kahilu Theatre.  Screening of: Te Mana o Te Moana, $2 Event Fee RSVP: pomai@kalo.org
  • Friday, March 11, 7:00-9:30 p.m. –SAIL-A-BRATION FUNDRAISER, Where: Kohala Village HUB Barn. What: Music and Entertainment. Donation at the Door, No RSVP needed.
  • Saturday, March 12, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. – Make Happy, A hui hou Hikianalia! Location: Kawaihae, Hawaii.  Community is invited to say a hui hou to Hikianalia. Potluck for community participants and Ohana Waa – bring something to share.

Video – Undercover Investigation Reveals Hawaii’s Illegal Ivory Trade

The illegal ivory trade is flourishing in Hawaii, with ivory dealers and businesses giving pointers to customers about how to skirt federal law to smuggle ivory out of the country without required permits.

elephant tusk

These were the findings of an undercover investigation by The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International that discovered ivory being sold in various venues, including jewelry stores, antique and collectibles stores – even a swap meet.

The illegal ivory trade is flourishing in Hawaii, with ivory dealers and businesses giving pointers to customers about how to skirt federal law to smuggle ivory out of the country without required permits. These were the findings of an undercover investigation by The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International that discovered ivory being sold in various venues, including jewelry stores, antique and collectible stores and a swap meet.

As shown in the undercover footage, the sellers had none of the documentation required under federal law to demonstrate the legality of the ivory items they were offering for sale. The lack of documentation provides cover for illegal ivory to be laundered into the marketplace. The investigator found ivory jewelry, figurines and tusks for sale. Some of the ivory looked as if it was newly obtained. As documented on the video, dealers are openly selling ivory of dubious origin and giving tips to customers on smuggling ivory out of the country or across state lines without required permits.

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UH Hilo Students, Faculty to Visit Japan to Share Hawaiian Culture and Language

Twenty-one students and two faculty members from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been selected to take part in a nine-day, fully-funded trip to Japan this month as part of the Tomodachi Inouye Scholars program sponsored by the United States-Japan Council.

tomodachi

The Tomodachi Inouye Scholars program, created to honor the legacy of the late Senator Daniel K. Inouye, provides UH Hilo students the opportunity to spend Spring Break (March 19-27) in Japan to interact with their peers and share their Hawaiian language and culture.

The UH Hilo contingent will visit historic and cultural sites in Tokyo and Hokkaido and participate in activities with students from Hokkaido University and Sapporo University. The students’ fluency in Hawaiian language and culture is a manifestation of and tribute to Inouye’s commitment and contributions to perpetuate indigenous cultures and languages in the U.S.

UH Hilo students include: Autumn Chong, Ursula Chong, Sophie Dolera, Dane Dudoit, Alexander Guerrero, Pomaika`i Iaea, Bridgette Ige, Micah Kealaiki, Kekaikaneolaho`ikeikonamanakalena Lindsey, Kawehi Lopez, Alohilani Maiava, Ashley Martin-Kalamau, Kelly Martin-Young, Noelle Miller, Isaac Pang, Pomaikai Ravey, Koa Rodrigues, Eric Taaca, Victoria Taylor, Tema`uonuhuhiva Teikitekahioho-Wolff, and Abcde Zoller. They will be joined by faculty members Yumiko Ohara and Kekoa Harman from Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikolani College of Hawaiian Language.

The Tomodachi Inouye Scholars program is open to undergraduate students at UH Hilo who speak, read, and write in Hawaiian, are able to participate fully in the scholars program, and once selected, speak and perform a hula or mele in Hawaiian.

For additional information, call the Center for Global Education and Exchange at 932-7489.

Double Fatality on Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway

Two men died in a traffic crash early Thursday morning (March 3) in North Kona near the 81-mile marker of Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway.
HPDBadgeResponding to a 1:02 a.m. call, police determined that the operator of a 2004 Honda van had been traveling south on Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway when it crossed the centerline and was involved in a head-on collision with a 1999 Chevrolet van, which had been traveling north.

The driver of the Chevrolet was taken to North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 3:05 a.m. He has been identified as 48-year-old Thomas Callero of Waikoloa.

The driver of the Honda was also taken to North Hawaii Community Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 5:10 a.m. He has been identified as 70-year-old Stewart Kroll of Kailua-Kona.

It was not immediately known if speed or alcohol were factors in the crash.

The Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a negligent homicide investigation and is asking for anyone who witnessed the crash to call Officer Kimo Keliipaakaua at 326-4646, extension 229. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.

These are the third and fourth traffic fatalities this year compared with five at this time last year.