Scattered Lava Breakouts and Clear Views of Pu’u O’o Crater

Scattered breakouts remain active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, with the farthest active lava yesterday at 5.9 km (3.7 miles) distance from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Click images to enlarge

Click images to enlarge

Much of the activity is at or near the forest boundary, creating numerous areas of burning. This view looks southwest, with Puʻu ʻŌʻō visible in the upper left portion of the image.

A closer view of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, just above the center point of the photograph.

hvo159View is towards the southwest. In the foreground, the circular lava pond that was active in July 2014 is visible. The lava tube feeding the active flows on the June 27th lava flow is evident by the line of white fume sources extending off the right side of the photograph.

Viewing conditions into Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater were exceptional today, providing clear views of the crater floor.

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This view is towards the northwest. The inner, deeper crater formed in mid-2014 following the opening of the June 27th vent, and occasional small flows on the crater floor are evident by their dark color. The smaller, circular pit in the west portion of the crater has contained a small, active lava pond in recent months. Very little of the original cone, formed in the early part of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption in the mid-1980s, remains visible on the surface. The tan colored area in the foreground, and the brown sections of the crater rim in the upper part of the photograph, are the original portions of the cone and consist of cinder and scoria.

This photograph was taken from the western pit at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and shows the small lava pond (roughly 20 m in diameter) contained within the pit.

This photograph was taken from the western pit at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and shows the small lava pond (roughly 20 m in diameter) contained within the pit.

Incandescence was visible in the small pit that formed recently on the upper northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

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Colorful sulfur deposits have formed recently around one of the cracks on the floor of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater.

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A view of the western portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater, with the small circular pit that contains the active lava pond.

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HVO’s cameras are on the rim at the right side of the photograph.

hvo165A hornito has recently formed over the lava tube on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, at the spot of the breakout that occurred on November 25.

An HVO geologist collects spatter deposited around the base of the hornito for geochemical analysis.

An HVO geologist collects spatter deposited around the base of the hornito for geochemical analysis.

 

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