VOG “Tasting Party” at the Lyman Museum

As Kīlauea’s current eruption continues to produce enough lava to fill a football stadium every week or so, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases, which are converted in the atmosphere to the vog (volcanic smog) that impacts our island environment.

Photo courtesy of Andrew J. Sutton showing volcanic gases boil out of the lava lake within Kilauea’s summit     “Overlook Vent,” to form the visible vog plume being carried to the southwest and up the Kona coast by trade winds in this 2008 USGS-HVO photograph.

Photo courtesy of Andrew J. Sutton showing volcanic gases boil out of the lava lake within Kilauea’s summit
“Overlook Vent,” to form the visible vog plume being carried to the southwest and up the Kona coast by trade winds in this 2008 USGS-HVO photograph.

On Monday, January 18, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Jeff Sutton, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemist, tells us everything we always wanted to know about volcanic gases, vog, and how they affect people, land, and our island infrastructure. Jeff will also host a “volcanic gas tasting party” at which you can identify specific volcanic gases using your sense of smell!

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Admission to this program is free to Museum members, $3 for nonmembers. For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

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