Reports Show Dengue Fever CAN Be Transmitted to the Larvae and Eggs

I’ve had many concerns on whether Dengue Fever can be transmitted from the female mosquito to their larvae and on to the eggs and it appears that it can happen!

Mosquito Laying Eggs
Big Island Video News posted the following video which showed the Hawaii State Department of Health Representative basically stating that they can’t confirm whether Dengue Fever can be spread to the eggs and larvae.

Thanks to the Hawaii Dengue Fever Awareness Facebook page, I’ve learned of more recent research that has been going on that shows that Dengue Fever can be passed on to the larvae and eggs:

Carey Yost posted some links she came across regarding this subject:

“…some of the more recent tropical information states that it can & does happen in some locations naturally (it has been known to happen in lab inoculations for a time:

Factors that influence mosquito competence for viral transmission:
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/…/1633/463.short

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/…/j.1365-2915…/abstract

There have been some isolated findings of naturally infected A. aegypti larva with DEN- 2 & 4, suggesting that transovarial transmission can occur (this testing is fairly new, prior methods of testing were fairly prohibitive on large scale natural larval pools):
http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/6859404

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/6542323

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/…/j.1948-7134.2011…/full

https://www.researchgate.net/…/0deec53b2381fc325d000000…

and in lab inoculated mosquitoes:
http://www.ajtmh.org/content/67/2/158.short

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/6625066

Yost said: “It is not real common, in the pools tested there are very very very few naturally occurring cases, and this has only been found in very few locations, though there have been samplings in most Dengue regions…so not at all a very common thing, but there is a slight chance, so everyone should be very diligent to eliminate larvae breeding areas…that is: any standing water: from things like; old tires, catchment tanks with breeding covers or that are not in use, even shells from coconuts, avocados, & lilikoi can provide adequate breeding area foe a slew of mosquitoes.”

Yost continued, “It is not the NORMAL way of transmission & until the recent advent of fairly inexpensive DNA testing, was not something anyone would test for (old methods were very expensive & time consuming)”

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