June 27th Lava Flow Update – Scattered Breakouts Persist

This photo looks west towards the upper East Rift Zone of Kīlauea. The fume-filled crater at Puʻu ʻŌʻō is in the foreground, and the vent for the June 27th lava flow is just out of view of the lower right corner of the photo.

Mauna Loa is visible in the upper right.  (Click to enlarge)

Mauna Loa is visible in the upper right. (Click to enlarge)

A hornito was active in the upper portion of the June 27th flow, with hissing and jetting sounds coming from a small opening at the top. The hornito here was about 2.5 m (8 feet) tall.

One side of the hornito has a small solidified flow of lava that oozed from the top, with the remainder consisting of spatter and Pele's hair. (Click to enlarge)

One side of the hornito has a small solidified flow of lava that oozed from the top, with the remainder consisting of spatter and Pele’s hair. (Click to enlarge)

A hornito is formed by gas and lava forced through a small opening in the roof of a lava tube.

The lava is quenched with water in the metal bucket.  (Click to enlarge)

The lava is quenched with water in the metal bucket. (Click to enlarge)

An HVO geologist collects a sample of active lava for chemical analysis.

A small channel feeds a lobe of pāhoehoe lava on the eastern margin of the June 27th flow.

Scattered breakouts like these were active on the flow field today, with the farthest active lava about 6.4 km (4 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. (Click to enlarge)

Scattered breakouts like these were active on the flow field today, with the farthest active lava about 6.4 km (4 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. (Click to enlarge)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

I do this to keep the spammers away * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.