Little Fire Ants Invade Hawaii – State Wasting Money Trying to Eradicate Them

Well the Little Fire Ants have now spread statewide here in Hawaii… don’t expect the State to protect you or your pets.

little fire antThe amount of money that the State of Hawaii is wasting on Little Fire Ants and attempting to control them is amazing.  Those of us that live in Puna know that you can’t get rid of them once you get them.

The state needs to look at other options like us Puna residents do now and educate folks how to keep them out of your house and away from your pets.

Take action now and do things like use ant insecticide chalk and other measures such as keeping your house clean of food items they could access to keep them out of your house.

Yes, the pain from a Little Fire Ant hurts like a bitch! Keeping them outside of your house is the best recommendation I can make.

VIDEO: NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Recovered

First video of NASA’s saucer-shaped test vehicle, the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) after it was recovered from the ocean and returned to Port Allen, Kauai, on June 29, 2014.

The LDSD Test Vehicle recovered

The LDSD Test Vehicle recovered

The LDSD vehicle had completed its first test flight from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai one day earlier.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/PnR5umhGDy0]

DLNR Closing Three Parks Early on Fourth of July

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of State Parks will conduct early closures of three parks on the Fourth of July holiday.

Hapuna Beach

Hapuna Beach State Park

Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area (including the Waialea Bay section), Kekaha Kai State Park (including the Maniniowali Beach / Kua Bay and Mahaiula Beach sections) and Kiholo State Park reserve will close at 5 p.m. July 4, 2014.

“We are closing these facilities early to discourage use of fireworks, which is prohibited in state parks, and to protect the public and natural resources of the areas,”said DLNR Chairperson William J. Aila, Jr.

Kiholo Bay

Kiholo Bay

Normal park hours will resume on Saturday, July 5, 2014, as follows:

  • Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area –7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Kekaha Kai State Park –9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Kiholo State Park reserve –7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

As a reminder, tents may not be set up at Wailoa River State Park in Hilo without a permit.

Kona Man Dies Following Assault

A 52-year-old man found badly injured in Kailua-Kona on Tuesday morning has died of his injuries.

HPDBadgeWalter Kamana of Kailua-Kona was pronounced dead at The Queen’s Medical Center on Oahu at 9:16 a.m. Wednesday (July 2). The Honolulu Medical Examiner’s office is scheduled to conduct an autopsy Thursday (July 3) to determine the exact cause of death.

The case was initially classified as an assault. Detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigations Section are awaiting results of the autopsy before reclassifying it. They continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding the death.

At 5:55 a.m. Tuesday (July 1), patrol officers conducting routine checks near the Kailua pier observed an unconscious local male, later identified as Kamana, lying face down on the makai sidewalk of Aliʻi Drive by the sea wall.

He was taken to Kona Community Hospital with a head injury and later moved to Queen’s in critical condition.

Police are looking for witnesses, including canoe paddlers observed in the area, who may have seen the incident. They ask anyone with any information about this case to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or contact Detective Shawn Tingle at 326-4646, extension 277, or [email protected].

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Training International Volcano Scientists and Saving Lives Worldwide

Scientists and technicians who work at volcano observatories in 11 countries are visiting the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory this week to learn techniques for monitoring active volcanoes.

Mike Poland (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows Marcellin Kasereka  (Goma Volcanological Survey, Democratic Republic of Congo, red jacket) how to adjust the leg of a tripod, while Patricia Ponce (Colombia Geological Survey, white hat) keeps the GPS antenna rod steady.

Mike Poland (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows Marcellin Kasereka (Goma Volcanological Survey, Democratic Republic of Congo, red jacket) how to adjust the leg of a tripod, while Patricia Ponce (Colombia Geological Survey, white hat) keeps the GPS antenna rod steady.

The International Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring is designed to assist scientists from other nations in attaining self-sufficiency in monitoring volcanoes and reducing the risks from eruptions. Field exercises on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes allow students to observe and operate a variety of instruments, and classroom instruction at the Observatory provides students the opportunity to interpret data, as well as plan a monitoring network for their home volcanoes. U.S. scientists are providing training on monitoring methods, data analysis and interpretation, and volcanic hazard assessment, and participants are taught about the use and maintenance of volcano monitoring instruments. Participants learn about forecasting events, responding rapidly during volcanic crises, and how to work with governing officials and the news media to save lives and property.

Organized by the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, with support from the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa and the joint USGS-U.S. Agency for International Development Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, the annual program has been training foreign scientists for 24 years. This year’s class includes 16 volcano scientists from Chile, Colombia Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Italy, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano's vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea’s east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano’s vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

“Hawaiian volcanoes offer an excellent teaching opportunity because our volcanoes are relatively accessible, they’re active, and USGS staff scientists can teach while actually monitoring volcanic activity,” said the USGS’s HVO Scientist-in-Charge, Jim Kauahikaua. “The small investment we make in training international scientists now goes a long way toward mitigating large volcanic disasters in the future.”

“Providing training in volcano hazards assessment and monitoring is by far the most cost effective strategy for reducing losses and saving lives for those developing nations exposed to high volcanic hazards risks,” said CSAV Director Donald Thomas. “The goal of our course is to provide our trainees with an understanding of the technologies that can be applied to an assessment of volcanic threats as well as how to interface with their respective communities to increase awareness of how to respond to those threats.”

“The training program directly benefits the United States, through international exchange of knowledge concerning volcanic eruptions, and it serves as an important element in our country’s humanitarian assistance and science diplomacy programs around the world,” said the USGS’s VDAP Chief, John Pallister.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano's vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea’s east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano’s vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

The international participants are learning to use both traditional geological tools and the latest technology. To anticipate the future behavior of a volcano, basic geologic mapping brings an understanding of what a volcano is capable of doing, how frequently it has erupted in the past, and what kind of rocks, and ash it produces. Using Geographic Information Systems, the students learn to predict lava flow paths, conduct a vulnerability assessment, and tabulate the predicted costs associated with the damage from a lava flow. Participants are trained in the emerging field of infrasound monitoring, which is critical for rapidly detecting volcanic explosions and/or rift zone eruptions, as well as basic seismological fundamentals, and a survey of pre-eruptive seismic swarms at various volcanoes around the world. Monitoring and modeling deformation of a volcano focuses on different techniques from traditional leveling methods to GPS and satellite-based radar.

Providing critical training to international scientists began at HVO, leading to the creation of CSAV to continue the legacy. Since 1990, almost 200 scientists and civil workers from 29 countries have received training in volcano monitoring methods through CSAV. USGS’s HVO continues to provide instructors and field experiences for the courses, and VDAP has a long-term partnership with CSAV, providing instructors and co-sponsoring participants from countries around the world.

Officer Nahale Recognized as “Officer of the Month”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Officer Wyattlane Nahale as “Officer of the Month” for July in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (July 2) at Huggo’s restaurant in Kailua-Kona.

Officer Wyattlane Nahale

Officer Wyattlane Nahale

Nahale was honored for his diligence and hard work in organizing the 2014 Dare Day event on May 1 in Kailua-Kona.

Nahale, who is the School Resource Officer for Konawaena Middle school, reached out to other schools in the area to assist and teach the DARE curriculum. Approximately 1,000 students from schools in the Kona, Ka‘ū, South Kohala, North Kohala and Hāmākua Districts competed the program and attended the DARE Day celebration.

During the time Nahale organized and directed DARE Day, he continued to perform his assigned duties and effectively handled both, said Sergeant Floyd Richards.

Sergeant Richards described the DARE Day event as “a huge success,” noting that local celebrities, such as Augie “T” and Brittany Pawai participated. The event generated a front-page story in a local newspaper.

As “Officer of the Month,” Nahale is eligible to become “Officer of the Year.”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee is an organization that encourages community involvement in aiding and supporting police in West Hawaiʻi.