Hawaii Lava Flow Update

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow front

View is toward the southwest. Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater and the Northeast spatter cone.

View is toward the southwest.

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow remains active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Yesterday, its most distant tip, in the foreground of this photo, was burning into the forest 7.0 km (4.3 miles) from its source at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater and the Northeast spatter cone

Lava reaches the surface at that point and flows directly into a lava tube, which feeds the active flows downslope. View is toward the west.

Lava reaches the surface at that point and flows directly into a lava tube, which feeds the active flows downslope. View is toward the west.

The fuming spatter cone near the center of the photo is informally called the “Northeast spatter cone”, and is the source of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow.

This has happened several times over the past year, and is likely a temporary situation. View is toward the northwest.

This has happened several times over the past year, and is likely a temporary situation. View is toward the northwest.

Right: While the top of the Northeast spatter cone is often open, revealing a small lava pond (see photo from June 6, 2014), today its top was sealed shut.

Halemaʻumaʻu and the Overlook Crater lava lake

The mostly destroyed visitor overlook is at the left side of the photo, on the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu. View is toward the west.

The mostly destroyed visitor overlook is at the left side of the photo, on the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu. View is toward the west.

The summit lava lake, its surface composed of solidified plates separated by incandescent seams, was about 42 m (138 ft) below the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu today.

Spattering like this is common, can occur anywhere around the lake margin (though it most often occurs at the southeast edge), and repeatedly starts and stops. View is toward the southeast.

Spattering like this is common, can occur anywhere around the lake margin (though it most often occurs at the southeast edge), and repeatedly starts and stops. View is toward the southeast.

Spattering was occurring at three locations along the edge of the lava lake during today’s overflight.

Announcement of Department of the Interior Hearings Raises Questions About Nation-Building Process

The United States Department of the Interior has announced its intention to hold hearings in Hawaii on a proposed rule that would establish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community. The hearings, which will begin on Monday in Honolulu are intended to solicit public comment on a number of questions surrounding the establishment of a Native Hawaiian government, including what role the federal government should take in organizing that government and drafting its constitution.

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign
The move comes even as various groups have called for a delay in OHA’s proposed election and Constitutional convention, citing practical questions about the impact of a Hawaiian nation on the state and the Native Hawaiian people. Though the DOI announcement of the hearings referenced the support of the state government and Congressional delegation in its decision to move forward with its rulemaking process, observers continue to question the way in which the advocates of nation-building appear determined to ignore the widespread lack of support for the process.

Also in question is the agency’s authority to recognize a Native Hawaiian government via executive action–an unprecedented step that could result in a legal challenge. In 2013, four members of the US Commission on Civil Rights wrote a letter to President Obama, urging him not to attempt to create a Native Hawaiian tribe in this matter, calling it, “unwise and unconstitutional.”

“Such precipitous action from the federal government begs the question of who it is that benefits from this rush to create a Native Hawaiian tribe,” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D. President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. “The low enrollment in the Native Hawaiian Roll and calls for delay from Native Hawaiians have shown that the Hawaiian community does not support these actions, a sentiment strongly echoed by the majority of those who live in our state.”

Dr. Akina continued: “The most astounding thing is that we are continuing with this process despite the fact that no one can or will explain so many key questions involved. Questions like: What shape would a Native Hawaiian government take? How would it affect all of those who live in the state? How would it change our legal process? Affect our economy? Change the face of Hawaii’s culture and society?”

“OHA and the Department of the Interior are treating the creation of an unconstitutional race-based nation as a done deal, despite all of the questions and objections that have been raised thus far. It appears that there is no real tribe to benefit from federal recognition of a native Hawaiian government — only narrow interests who stand to gain from potential land acquisition and power. I urge all Hawaiians who care about the future of our state to take the time to come to one of the DOI hearings and make their voice heard on this reckless and divisive proposal,” he concluded.

Interior Considers Procedures to Reestablish a Government-to-Government Relationship with the Native Hawaiian Community

In response to requests from the Native Hawaiian community, Hawaii’s congressional delegation and state leaders, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced today a first step to consider reestablishing a government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Native Hawaiian community.

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign
The purpose of such a relationship would be to more effectively implement the special political and trust relationship that currently exists between the Federal government and the Native Hawaiian community. Today’s action, known as an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), provides for an extensive series of public meetings and consultations in Hawaii and Indian Country to solicit comments that could help determine whether the Department develops a formal, administrative procedure for reestablishing an official government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community and if so, what that procedure should be.

“When I met with members of the Native Hawaiian community last year during my visit to the state, I learned first-hand about Hawaii’s unique history and the importance of the special trust relationship that exists between the Federal government and the Native Hawaiian community,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Through this step, the Department is responding to requests from not only the Native Hawaiian community but also state and local leaders and interested parties who recognize that we need to begin a conversation of diverse voices to help determine the best path forward for honoring the trust relationship that Congress has created specifically to benefit Native Hawaiians.”

Over many decades, Congress has enacted more than 150 statutes that specifically recognize and implement this trust relationship with the Native Hawaiian community, including the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, the Native Hawaiian Education Act, and the Native Hawaiian Health Care Act. The Native Hawaiian community, however, has not had a formal governing entity since the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1893. In 1993, Congress enacted the Apology Resolution which offered an apology to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the United States for its role in the overthrow and committed the U.S. government to a process of reconciliation. In 2000, the Department of the Interior and the Department of Justice jointly issued a report on the reconciliation process that identified self-determination for Native Hawaiians under Federal law as their leading recommendation.

The ANPRM, available tomorrow on the Federal Register, outlines the following five threshold questions that will be the subject of the forthcoming public meetings regarding whether the Federal Government should reestablish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community:

  • Should the Secretary propose an administrative rule that would facilitate the reestablishment of a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community?
  • Should the Secretary assist the Native Hawaiian community in reorganizing its government, with which the United States could reestablish a government-to-government relationship?
  • If so, what process should be established for drafting and ratifying a reorganized Native Hawaiian government’s constitution or other governing document?
  • Should the Secretary instead rely on the reorganization of a Native Hawaiian government through a process established by the Native Hawaiian community and facilitated by the State of Hawaii, to the extent such a process is consistent with Federal law?
  • If so, what conditions should the Secretary establish as prerequisites to Federal acknowledgment of a government-to-government relationship with the reorganized Native Hawaiian government?

The Department will be engaging in an extensive series of public meetings throughout the State of Hawaii and in Indian Country to solicit comments and feedback on whether and how the process of reestablishing a government-to-government relationship should move forward. These meetings will be held in Hawaii and the continental United States as follows:

Public Meetings in Hawaii – June 23 through July 8

Oahu

Monday, June 23 — Honolulu – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium

Monday, June 23 — Waimanalo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimanalo Elementary and Intermediate School

Tuesday, June 24 — Waianae Coast – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Nanaikapono Elementary School

Wednesday, June 25 — Kaneohe – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Heeia Elementary School

Thursday, June 26 — Kapolei – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Makakilo Elementary School

Lanai

Friday, June 27 — Lanai City – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Lanai Senior Center

Molokai

Saturday, June 28 — Kaunakakai – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Kaunakakai Elementary School

Kauai

Monday, June 30 — Waimea – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimea Neighborhood Center

Tuesday, July 1 — Kapaa – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kapaa Elementary School

Hawaii Island

Wednesday, July 2 — Hilo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Keaukaha Elementary School

Thursday, July 3 — Waimea – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Waimea Community Center

Thursday, July 3 — Kona – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kealakehe High School

Maui

Saturday, July 5 — Hana – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Hana High and Elementary School

Monday, July 7 — Lahaina – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
King Kamehameha III Elementary School

Tuesday, July 8 — Kahului – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Pomaikai Elementary School

UH Hilo Alumnus Wins National Software Competition

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo student Mike Purvis won first place in the 2013 Pearson Coding Contest and was awarded $10,000.

Purvis

The software competition is open to undergraduate students in the United States. Contestants develop relevant, innovative, creative, functional and original applications that integrate with the Pearson LearningStudio Learning Management System and/or utilize the LearningStudio application programming interfaces (API).

Purvis developed a module that integrates with existing Drupal university websites and brings in information about Pearson courses. He utilized a Twilio API to allow students to receive text messages when new course announcements or exams are created. Students can also set goals for their classes and professors can see how the class is doing at reaching their goals.

Go to the Pearson Coding Contest website for more on Purvis’ entry.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/RdfexL0u7fo]

Pearson is a learning company that partners with faculty and institutions to create innovative solutions to improve student achievement and institutional effectiveness.

Purvis was also part of the UH Hilo team that won the 2013 Microsoft Imagine Cup U.S. Finals. The team created an app called Help Me Help, which allows users to share photos and information about hazards they may encounter in emergency situations such as fires, floods or roadblocks.

Chancellor Don Straney honored Purvis at UH Hilo’s Fall 2013 commencement with the Community Spirit Award, which includes a $500 cash prize. The award recognizes students who demonstrate excellence in applied research, learning and innovation in their respective fields of study.

Governor’s Statement on U.S. Interior Department’s Proposal to Reestablish Government-to-Government Relationship with Native Hawaiian Community

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today released the following statement regarding the U.S. Department of the Interior’s procedures to reestablish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community:

“We look forward to welcoming representatives of the U.S. Departments of the Interior and Justice to discuss ideas for updating federal policy on Native Hawaiian self-determination.

“I commend the Obama Administration for recognizing and supporting Native Hawaiians as it works to reconcile its relationship with Native Hawaiians at the federal level.”

Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Events for July

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in July. All programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Making lei at last year's Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Making lei at last year’s Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Ulana Lauhala. Learn to weave a decorative star from leaves of the pandanus tree. Lau hala are used to create a wide array of attractive, useful, and traditional Hawaiian arts and crafts. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., July 9, from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Cultural Festival in Kahuku. The 34th annual Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival will be held in Kahuku this year.  Enjoy hula kāhiko and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. Taste traditional, ono Hawaiian foods. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair, plus sunscreen and a hat. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This is a family-friendly, drug- and alcohol-free event. The Kahuku unit is the southernmost section of the national park, and is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5. Free entry and free parking. Sponsors include Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Ka‘ū Hawaiian Civic Club, Kīlauea Military Camp, and our sister parks in West Hawai‘i. Call 808-985-6011 or email havo_interpretation@nps.gov for more information.
When: Sat., July 12, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Kahuku

Hula Performance. Visiting from Honolulu, the ladies of Hālau Hula Kamamolikolehua, under the direction of kumu hula Pōhai Souza, share hula ‘auana (modern hula) at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Also sharing the stage are Hālau Hula Kalehuapuakea, with kumu hula Keu Ostrem, and Hālau Hula Kamaluokukui, under the direction of kumu hula Malina Kaulukukui. Music performed by Kualoa, featuring Kula Abiva and Pokiʻi Vaughan. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 15, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Untold Story

The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i. While the story of the 1942 mass round-up, eviction and imprisonment of Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington has been well documented, very little is known about the Hawai‘i internees and their unique experience during World War II. This is the first full-length documentary to chronicle this untold story in Hawai‘i’s history. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 29, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium