Search Suspended for Fisherman Off Big Island

The Coast Guard and Hawaii County Fire Department are searching for a missing fisherman off the Big Island Saturday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A 56-year-old male was fishing from a 10-foot cliff near Mackenzie State Recreation Area Friday evening when reporting sources say he was  swept out to sea after either slipping or being washed off by a wave.

Watchstanders at the Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification from the Hawaii County Fire Department Friday at 9:40 p.m. and launched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point and diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, 110-foot patrol boat.

Hawaii County Fire Department has a rescue boat and ground team also assisting in the search.

The missing fisherman was wearing black rain gear.

For more information, contact the 14th Coast Guard District public affairs office at (808) 535-3230.

Update:

“Aerial search conducted up to 1/2 mi. offshore, dive operations conducted fronting Malama Flats area, ground search conducted from Pohoiki to Kaimu Beach. All negative findings. Search suspended till first light on Sunday June 8, 2014.”

2014 Summer Fun Programs Announced on the Big Island

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is announcing the 2014 Summer Fun Program.

Fun program will start on June 9, 2014 at the following location and hours:

summer fun

For safety reasons, use of the facilities will be limited to Summer Fun participants during program hours.

If you are interested in registering a child please call 961-8740 or 938-2012 to find out which sites are available. Program guides can also be found at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

Big Island Artist Unveils Sculpture Honoring Body Glove Founders

Big Island artist Chris Barela is unveiled his life-size statue here Thursday of the two brothers who greatly influenced the sports of surfing and diving. A bronze statue of Body Glove founders Bob and Bill Meistrell—who also invented the modern-day wetsuit—will grace the entrance to King Harbor Yacht Club at Redondo Beach’s scenic Seaside Lagoon.

Chris Barela puts the finishing touches on the life-size statue in Ventura CA

Chris Barela puts the finishing touches on the life-size statue in Ventura CA

See a mini-version of the statue on display at Barela Gallery at The Shops at Mauna Lani. For over a year, Barela sculpted the Body Glove marquette inside the Kohala Coast gallery for visiting guests to watch his techniques. After appearing at the 2014 Mavericks surf contest, the completed, 32-inch piece is back at the gallery and exhibited with photos detailing the sculpting process of the larger bronze.

To do the life-size statue, Barela built an additional studio at his Puako home where the armature, sculpt and mould were completed. The mould was packed and shipped in three different crates to Barela’s foundry in Ventura, California, where a team of skilled craftsmen used the lost wax process to complete the bronze memorial statue.

“It was like working in paradise, except for the heat and mosquitoes,” says Barela about his home studio. “It is an honor to have been chosen for this Body Glove project as the late Bob and Bill Meistrell were an inspiration to many.”

A former professional surfer who appeared on the cover of Surfing Magazine, Barela retired from the sport in the late 1980s and turned his love for the ocean into a career in sculpture, painting, photography and filmmaking.

Chris Barela with marquette of Body Glove statue in Barela Gallery

Chris Barela with marquette of Body Glove statue in Barela Gallery

“My passion is to bring awareness to the beauty of life within our oceans,” shares Barela, who is most recognized for his bronze sculpture of octopus. The Golden State native boasts public installations from the Oregon Coast to Key West, Florida, including those of Zane Grey, Hollywood Western writer; baseball great Ted Williams and the Tim Kelly statue standing sentinel at Hermosa Beach Pier. Barela was awarded first place at the 2011 Hawaii Ocean Film Festival for his short film on octopus.

For information, contact Barela Gallery at 808-885-5111 or visit www.barelagallery.com.

Hawaii Lava Flow Update

Breakouts remain active on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

Summit deflation in May resulted in a decrease in lava supply to the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, with the flow front becoming inactive and stalling. Breakouts behind the flow front, however, remain active. The thermal image on the right shows these breakouts clearly as the yellow and white regions.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning - a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning – a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

The lava pond in the northeast portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains active, and has built up a slightly elevated rim following several overflows over the past week.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

An HVO geologist shields his face from intense heat as he dips a rock hammer into an active pāhoehoe toe. After scooping out the lava it is placed in the water to quench it.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

Good views of the lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

Thin fume allowed good views of the lava lake in the Overlook crater, which is set within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at the summit of Kīlauea.

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

A view of the summit lava lake from above, using a thermal camera. The thermal images clearly show the thin crustal plates that make up the surface of the lake. The plates are separated by hot incandescent cracks.

Free Keiki Performing Arts Workshop

Students entering grades 3-6 are invited to apply to the “Keiki Performing Arts Workshop” from July 28 to August 10 at Kahilu Theatre. This is a free two-week summer musical theatre and performing arts camp from 10am to 2:30pm, Monday through Saturday.

Courtesy of Steve Campbell of a young actor at a recent Kahilu Theatre Family Fun Day

Courtesy of Steve Campbell of a young actor at a recent Kahilu Theatre Family Fun Day

Founded in 2011, KPAW introduces children to different aspects of the performing arts. As schools have been forced to cut arts education, Kahilu Theatre is filling this gap by providing diverse arts education for youth.

After a physical warm-up, KPAW students participate in numerous acting games that involve physical awareness, improvisation and quick thinking. They rehearse music numbers each day, learning lyrics, tunes and choreography for the numbers. Students also explore theatre related arts and crafts, including costuming and set design. The final performance will be on Sunday, August 10th as part of Kahilu Theatre’s Family Fun Day.

Keiki Performing Arts Workshop was founded by Marena Dunnington and the teens of the Teen Theatre Troupe, now the Kahilu Youth Theatre Troupe. From Waimea, Marena is now a junior at Muhlenberg College, studying theatre and education. Performing since age three, Marena’s greatest joy is working with kids in a theatrical setting. Marena says “Art is so important to childhood development and to the well-being of a community, and our hope is to expose children in our community to as much art as we can so that they can learn and grow from it.”

All of the KPAW teachers are college students pursuing performing art careers. KPAW will also be assisted by high school students from Waimea. Students only need to bring lunch, everything else will be provided by Kahilu Theatre.

Applications for KPAW are available at http://kahilutheatre.org/Education/Youth and due by June 11. Applicants will be notified of acceptance by June 17, 2014. KPAW is supported in part by the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts through appropriations from the Legislature of the State of Hawaii and by the National Endowment of the Arts.

Infectious Diseases Among Top Conditions for Hawaii’s Waitlist

Nearly one in five of Hawaii’s waitlisted patients—that is, those remaining in a hospital after the need for acute care ceases—have an infectious disease, according to discharge data analyzed by the Hawaii Health Information Corporation (HHIC), the state’s premier healthcare data collector and analyzer.

Hawaii Health Information Corporation (HHIC)Waitlist patients are those needing treatment, but not at the severity level that requires inpatient care.  These patients often continue to stay in a hospital because there are limited available community placement options that meet the patient’s needs.

According to 2011 data, infectious diseases, including septicemia, parasitic diseases and cellulitis, are the most costly conditions among waitlist patients in our state.  Septicemia (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure or death) is the most common and most expensive of these conditions, costing hospitals $4.7 million annually.  The number of waitlist patients with this life-threatening disease increased 163 percent between 2006 and 2011.    Waitlist patients with infectious diseases are the most difficult to place and result in a patient being waitlisted for an extended period.

The second most expensive waitlist patients are those with a tracheostomy, a surgically created opening in the neck leading directly to the trachea (windpipe), which allows a person to breathe without the use of his or her nose or mouth.  In Hawaii, this group costs hospitals $3.5 million annually.  Tracheostomy is also among the longest-stay conditions for waitlisted patients.

Also among the top 12 most costly conditions are: cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries and the leading cause of heart attacks), amputation of lower limbs, hip and femur procedures for trauma, major respiratory infections, renal failure, head trauma with coma for less than an hour, and back and neck disorders.  Combined, the top 12 waitlisted conditions cost $25.6 million, representing 37 percent of the $62.7 million annual waitlist cost to hospitals in 2011.

HHIC also found that mental illness is a common underlying and complicating condition, affecting 49 percent of waitlisted patients.  Four of the top 12 longest-stay waitlisted conditions—drug and alcohol abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and depression—are mental health-related.

Between 2006 and 2011, heart failure, kidney and urinary tract infections and pneumonia received much focus in quality assurance programs and have fallen off the list of the top 12 most costly waitlist conditions.

The key barriers to community placement of waitlisted patients include insufficient staff with higher skill-mix in nursing homes and other placement alternatives to meet the needs of those with complex conditions, a lack of specialty equipment to provide appropriate care, the cost of multiple or high-cost antibiotics, and lack of community-based resources to support patients with underlying mentally illness in managing their other medical conditions.

“Meeting the complex medical and behavioral needs of waitlisted patients is a key challenge in reducing the hospital waitlist,” said Peter Sybinsky, Ph.D., president and CEO of HHIC.  “Solutions will require development of appropriate community and institutional resources and the funding sources to maintain them.  As a community, we need to take aggressive efforts to address both.”

About the Data
Findings are based on data collected from all hospitals across the state, except Tripler Army Medical Center.  The report was prepared based on funding provided by Hawaii Medical Service Association, Kaiser-Permanente, AlohaCare, Ohana Healthcare and United Healthcare, in an attempt to provide a clear description of Hawaii’s waitlist population and estimate the financial impact on Hawaii’s hospitals.