Farm to Table Benefit for Kahilu Theatre and PA‘I Foundation

Farm to table will take on new meaning at the Farm to Table benefit event for Kahilu Theatre and PA‘I Foundation on June 1st: all the food – meats, dairy products and produce – will come from the farm literally footsteps away from the table.

The Kahilu Theatre photo by Jane Sibbett

The Kahilu Theatre photo by Jane Sibbett

Real Farm at Waikii Ranch, the home of Tim Bostock and Melanie Holt and their family, is the venue for this special meal. Bostock is the director of Kahilu Theatre in Waimea; Holt is the organic farmer who is overseeing all the provisions for the afternoon meal that will be prepared by Honolulu chef Mark Noguchi.

Lamb, turkey and pork are on the menu, all raised on the farm. An extensive array of vegetables will be harvested including artichokes, asparagus, fennel, tomatoes, fava beans, mange-tout peas, cabbages, brussel sprouts, kale, sweet potato, carrot, lettuce, celery, Swiss chard, cucumber and eggplant. No doubt Meyer lemons, basil, rosemary, lavender, nasturtiums and borage will also make an appearance on the plate.

Daughter Jasmine “Jazzy” Bostock will be displaying cheeses made from fresh milk provided by Buttercup, the Jersey cow. Feta will likely be paired with beets in a salad and fresh eggs from the hens will also be incorporated into the meal.

Noguchi will be checking on the harvest the week before the event. Formerly with Kona Village, “Gooch” is known for his commitment to using locally grown food products in his menus.

In addition to the fine spread of fresh and tasty food, there will be entertainment by Komakakino and Hamajang. Guests will be seated on the lawn under a tent with outstanding views of Mauna Kea and the Kohala Coast. VIP tickets include special seating, a champagne and chef’s selected pupu menu, meet and greet with Chef “Gooch, ” personal farm tour with Tim and Mel, and intimate reception with Robert Cazimero at the piano. Tables of 10 can be reserved

The event will benefit Kahilu Theatre, Waimea town’s premier performing arts venue, and PA‘I Foundation, dedicated to the preservation and perpetuation of Hawaiian cultural traditions.

Kahilu Farm to Table

Tickets are $150 per person, $250 for VIP Early Admission. The event begins at 1pm for VIP and 2pm for all others at Waikii Ranch. For tickets go to: http://kahilutheatre.org/Showinfo/Farm-to-Table.

Portia Doubleday Receives Golden Honu Award at Big Island Film Festival

Last night at the Big Island Film Festival, there was a celebrity salute and reception for actress Portia Doubleday.

Big Island Film Festival Founder & Executive Leo Sears presents Doubleday with a Golden Honu Award

Big Island Film Festival Founder & Executive Leo Sears presents Doubleday with a Golden Honu Award

Portia was awarded a “Golden Honu” award for being a “Star to Watch”.   She answered questions from folks attending the Festival and then afterwards people got to meet with her and have a reception that was sponsored by Kenwood Wines and the Fairmont Orchid.

The reception sponsored by Kenwood Wines and the Fairmont Orchid

The reception sponsored by Kenwood Wines and the Fairmont Orchid

Portia most recently co-starred opposite Chloe Moretz in CARRIE as bad girl Chris Hargensen and has a cameo opposite Joaquin Phoenix as the sex surrogate in Spike Jonze critically acclaimed film HER.

A star to watch!

A star to watch!

Portia also co-starred alongside Martin Lawrence and Brandon T. Jackson in 20th Century Fox’s BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON.  She starred in her first leading role opposite Michael Cera in Miguel Artera’s film YOUTH IN REVOLT, which was named one of the ten best films of the year by the National Board of Review.

Portia with Photographer Kirk Aeder

Portia with Photographer Kirk Aeder

I had an opportunity to have a one-on-one interview with Portia and here are some of the things she shared with me:

Deep Thoughts with Doubleday!

Deep Thoughts with Doubleday!

Aloha Portia welcome to Hawaii… have you been here before?

The first time I came to Hawaii was six months ago and I stayed in Maui but I love the Big Island, I went “Snubaing” today on a boat and supposedly went to one of the ten most beautiful places in the world… It’s paradise here, I love it!

So you’re here for the Big Island Film Festival, can you tell me about some of the projects you are working on?

I just got finished with a movie called “Act of All” filmed in Montreal where I play a girl and a boy and that movie should be coming out in about six months or so… I literally just got through filming it about 7 days ago so this is a really nice little vacation for me.

Where are you from in California and what High School did you go to?

I grew up in Hancock Park and went to Laces on 18th street which was a college-prep school where I did drama, choir and dance there.

What got you into acting?

I come from an acting family as both my parents were actors, my plan was that I would go to school and get my degree and then when I was trained when I was like 30 I would start acting around then… I hadn’t planned on acting as young as I am at all… it just kind of happened that way.

I went to a program at Cal Arts and Academy of Dramatic Arts and studied while I was in school and to me auditioning was just for fun as a I was a psychology major… and I just kind of jumped into the game. I’m still in school, I have been now for 6 years and I’m determined to get my degree.

Out of all the projects that you have worked on what was your favorite?

It’s really hard to say because I have a different taste in my mouth for all of them… I love what I do so I’m most comfortable on the set… I love all the projects for different reasons but I really loved doing “Carrie”.

So for all single guys out there… are you married or are you in a relationship?

Not married… I am single…. (laughs)

What do you plan on doing after you leave the Big Island?

Crying… because I’m going to miss it here… tomorrow I’ll be swimming with the dolphins.

How can fans follow you in the future?

Well I’m on Instagram at @PortiaDD. I have a twitter account but I don’t know how to use it. I think the last tweet I sent out said “I don’t know how to use Twitter”…. But I know how to use instagram.

Portia and some dude!

Portia and some dude!

Big Island Film Festival Workshop – “Adding Fiction to the Truth in Your Writing”

This morning at the Big Island Film Festival at the Fairmont Orchid, a Filmmaker Workshop was held with Story/Career Consultant Jen Grisanti about “Adding Fiction to the Truth in Your Writing”.

Jen Grisanti leading a filmmaker workshop at the 2014 Big Island Film Festival.

Jen Grisanti leading a filmmaker workshop at the 2014 Big Island Film Festival.

When you come from a place of emotional truth in your writing and add fiction to it in your story, you connect with your audience.  Grisanti spoke about how to take inventory of your history and identify your universal life moments through looking at your dilemmas, your failures and your successes.  After taking the time to mine your creative well, you will find your gold.

Celebrity Portia Doubleday and Jen Grisanti

Celebrity Portia Doubleday and Jen Grisanti

International speaker Grisanti is an acclaimed Story/Career Consultant at her company Jen Grisanti Consultancy Inc., Writing Instructor for Writers on the Verge at NBC, former 12-year studio executive, including VP of Current Programming at CBS/Paramount, blogger for the Huffington Post and author of the books, Story Line: Finding Gold In Your Life Story and TV Writing Tool Kit: How To Write a Script That Sells and the upcoming book, Change Your Story, Changer Your Life: A Path To Your Success.

Thousands Attend Honoka’a Western Week

Herds of people filled the streets of Honoka‘a town Friday, celebrating what was officially proclaimed by Governor Neil Abercrombie as “Honoka‘a Western Week” in Hawai‘i. Kahu and paniolo Larry Ignacio, dressed the part with chaps and six-shooter, read the proclamation to open Friday’s festivities, attended by over 2,000 people.

Big crowd fills Mamane Street in Honoka'a Friday, for stick horse races, talent show, music and dancing in the street. Photo by Sarah Anderson

Big crowd fills Mamane Street in Honoka’a Friday, for stick horse races, talent show, music and dancing in the street. Photo by Sarah Anderson

Mamane Street closed at 2 p.m., to prep for the Paniolo Parade and set up food and vendor booths, a stage for live country music, crowning of the Rodeo Queens by visiting Miss Rodeo Colorado Rhianna Russell, and exciting Stick Horse Races for keiki, emceed by Dominic Yagong. At 3 p.m., more than 40 horses and riders paraded through town, including Mayor Billy Kenoi and Councilwoman Valerie Poindexter, styling authentic garb.

The new 1,200-seat Rose Andrade Correia Stadium at the Honoka‘a Rodeo Arena replaces old bleachers that were exposed to the elements.

The new 1,200-seat Rose Andrade Correia Stadium at the Honoka‘a Rodeo Arena replaces old bleachers that were exposed to the elements.

Earlier in the week, the Andrade Building in town hosted a gala re-opening of the ʻŌhiʻa Lanai, celebrating its 90th anniversary. The refurbished rodeo arena opened on Monday, named the “Rose Andrade Correia Stadium,” in honor of the Andrade family matriarch and benefactor who donated her land to the County of Hawai‘i in support of Hawai‘i Saddle Club and Hawaii’s paniolo.

"Sheriff" Eddie Castillo and Larry Ignacio with "jailed" saloon girls.  Prisoners were released after purchasing their Honoka'a Western Week buttons for $3.  Photo by Sarah Anderson

“Sheriff” Eddie Castillo and Larry Ignacio with “jailed” saloon girls. Prisoners were released after purchasing their Honoka’a Western Week buttons for $3. Photo by Sarah Anderson

The Hawai‘i Saddle Club Scholarship Rodeo continues through Monday, May 26.

Honoka‘a Western Week is a volunteer-driven project of the Honokaa Business Association, The Hāmākua Farm Bureau and the Hāmākua Lion’s Club celebrating Hamakua’s paniolo heritage and unique cultural blend. Sponsors include Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, County of Hawaiʻi CPEP, Councilwoman Valerie Poindexter, Kamehameha Schools, Mayor Billy Kenoi, Ramos Ranch, Steinlager, Paradise Beverages, Big Island Toyota, DeLuz Trucking, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Andrade Building, Hapai Enterprises, and many other generous supporters.

Palace Event to Remember King Kamehameha

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 8 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Inside Hulihee Palace

Inside Hulihe’e Palace

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu; he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe'e Palace

Hulihe’e Palace

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays- Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.