Albizia-Control Training Workshops in Puna

Invasive albizia trees pose imminent danger to homes, powerlines, emergency access routes, and native forests. As the fastest-growing tree in the world, its brittle branches and shallow roots make it an impending threat to public safety. As part of the “Albizia Demonstration Project,” the Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC) is providing community training workshops on albizia control on the second Saturday of April and May, in Black Sands, Puna.

Albizia

 

When:        Saturday, April 12th & May 10th, 8:30am-12:00pm

Where:       Meet at the Corner of Ocean View Parkway and Aloha Road, in Black Sands (map).

Directions from Highway 130: Turn right onto One Ele`ele Road. Take the first left onto Ocean View Parkway. Park on the side of the road near the BIISC tent at the corner of Ocean View Parkway and Aloha Rd (12 minutes from Pahoa Town).

What:         Participants will learn how to estimate tree height and the “Incision Point Application” control method, developed by the University of Hawaii and the U.S. Forest Service. Through hands-on training, volunteers will apply their skills to trees endangering the Keauohana Forest, roads, homes and power lines in Black Sands Subdivision.

Who:          Anyone interested in learning about Albizia control. Volunteers under 18 years old must have parental consent.

Sign-up:     Space is limited, please sign-up by emailing biisc@hawaii.edu your name and phone number by Wednesday, April 9th (for April workshop) and Wednesday, May 7th (for May).

What you should bring:

Volunteers are asked to wear sturdy shoes, pants, a long-sleeved shirt, hat, bug repellent, and sunscreen. Gloves, hatchets, herbicide, safety gear, hand-washing stations, and refreshments will be provided.

Why in Black Sands?

BIISC identified the Black Sands area of Puna as a case study to showcase the wide range of issues in albizia control, develop best management practices, and empower communities to limit the spread of these menacing trees in their own neighborhoods. The 500-acre “Albizia Demonstration Project” area in Puna includes trees overhanging homes and roads, as well as in native lowland Keauohana forest.

Why use herbicide?

The “Incision Point Application” control method has proven most effective and efficient at killing non-hazard albizia trees in natural areas (at least 100 ft. away from homes or roads). This method involves making one angled cut every 6-10’’ around the tree trunk, then carefully applying 0.5-1mL (10-20 drops) of Milestone Specialty Herbicide into each cut. The herbicide is then taken into the tree’s circulatory system, killing the tree. The tree will drop its leaves within two weeks and crumble over the next two years. This method does not disturb the surrounding foliage, allowing a natural shield from more albizia seeds taking root. More information about Milestone and how to ensure environmental and human safety will be available at the training workshops.

What is BIISC?

The Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC) is a voluntary partnership of private citizens, community organizations, businesses, and government agencies working to address invasive species issues on the island of Hawaii. The mission of BIISC is to prevent, detect, and control the spread of the highest risk invasive species threats to the Big Island environment, economy, and way of life. BIISC’s guiding principle is to serve the land and people of Hawaii. BIISC is a project of the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit of the University of Hawaii.  Projects are funded by a combination of public and private service contracts and competitive grants.

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