Kayakers in Distress Rescued Off the Big Island

The Hawaii Fire Department and the United States Coast Guard rescued two kayakers that were in distress off the Big Island this afternoon:

Billy Pugh Net

Billy Pugh Net

Location:

Offshore, approx. 9mm Akoni Pule Hwy

Situation found at scene:

Upon arrival on scene met with the father of kayakers and spotted them with C-2.  Winds were coming from N.E. direction approx. 20-30 mph with  heavy white caps.

Cause:

Very strong offshore trade winds and lack of good judgement of strong wind and currents.

Remarks:

Two kayakers in distress were found by C-2.  Deployed one rescue swimmer to assist with billy pugh rescue.  USCG Cutter Kiska which was in the area doing training arrived on scene and rescued 2 people who were brought to Kawaihae Pier 1and no EMS was needed.

8 Hikers Rescued From Waipio Valley

The Hawaii Fire Department rescued eight hikers today that found themselves stuck in Waipio Valley because of bad weather and they were unable to pass over flowing rivers and streams.

About.Com Travel Writer John Fischer and Deston Nokes (www.destonnokes.com) hike Waipio Valley while Becky Ryan follows up the pack in a hike into Waipio we did back a few years ago.

About.Com Travel Writer John Fischer and Deston Nokes (www.destonnokes.com) hike Waipio Valley while Becky Ryan follows up the pack in a hike into Waipio we did back a few years ago.

HFD responded to 8 overdue hikers in Waipio Valley.  The hikers were unable to hike out due to worsening weather conditions and rapidly rising rivers and streams.  The hikers stayed overnight and was located and extricated out of Waipio Valley by HFD personnel the next day.  All 8 Hikers were not injured and denied any emergency medical services.

 

Big Island Lady Goes Ballistic Test Driving Car – Video Goes Viral

This Big Island Lady went ballistic yesterday test driving a car.  The car salesman simply asked her to drive the speed limit and she totally lost it.  A friend of mine said “this happened yesterday (3/22/14) at my car lot. The guy on the test drive is my co-worker. He posted this video to youtube this morning and is going viral all over the internet.”

WARNING VIDEO CONTAINS VIOLENT AND RACIAL LANGUAGE:
[youtube=http://youtu.be/EQTmOMlaxpM]

My friend went on to say, “We know the lady is a former customer of ours and has bought several cars from us prior. We are 95% sure we know her identity, but the salesman working the sale failed to obtain a copy of her driver’s license, so we’re not 100% positive.

Hawaiian Electric Companies Share Daily Solar and Wind Power Data

The Hawaiian Electric Companies are now sharing “Renewable Watch” for Oahu, Maui and Hawaii Island, online displays that show the daily contribution of solar and wind generation on each island and how energy from these resources changes throughout the day.

The orange line measures the amount of energy produced by PV throughout Hawaii Island. The green line measures the wind energy production from wind facilities on Hawaii Island. The blue line represents the net system load, which is the amount of energy met by utility generation. The light blue line is the gross system load, which is the total demand, or the total amount of electricity used by customers, on the system. This demand is met by a combination of what is served by the utility and what is provided by local distributed systems, such as PV on rooftops. The difference between the blue and light blue lines represents the estimated aggregated distributed generation produced by local PV generation. This estimate provides a good estimate of how much energy is being produced by rooftop PV systems without our having to meter every rooftop PV system. This perspective provided operations and planning personnel with the information to gauge the impact of rooftop PV on system load and helped explain the decrease in mid-day load. (Click to Enlarge)

The orange line measures the amount of energy produced by PV throughout Hawaii Island.
The green line measures the wind energy production from wind facilities on Hawaii Island.
The blue line represents the net system load, which is the amount of energy met by utility generation.
The light blue line is the gross system load, which is the total demand, or the total amount of electricity used by customers, on the system. This demand is met by a combination of what is served by the utility and what is provided by local distributed systems, such as PV on rooftops.
The difference between the blue and light blue lines represents the estimated aggregated distributed generation produced by local PV generation. This estimate provides a good estimate of how much energy is being produced by rooftop PV systems without our having to meter every rooftop PV system. This perspective provided operations and planning personnel with the information to gauge the impact of rooftop PV on system load and helped explain the decrease in mid-day load.
(Click to Enlarge)

Displays for each island can be found on the homepage under Clean Energy Future at www.hawaiianelectric.com for Oahu, on www.mauielectric.com for Maui Island and www.hawaiielectriclight.com for the Island of Hawaii.

Each island’s display shows the measured output from large wind and solar facilities combined with the estimated output from residential rooftop PV systems. These sites graphically show how renewable energy resources can vary significantly by region, day, and time of day due to changes in weather, such as wind strength and cloud cover. (Non-variable renewable energy generation — such as geothermal on Hawaii Island, bagasse-fired generation from HC&S on Maui and HPOWER on Oahu — are not shown.)

“Hawaii is blessed with abundant sunshine and strong winds. With the ‘Renewable Watch’ displays, anyone can see at a glance that these are extremely productive resources with output that varies throughout the day,” said Scott Seu, Hawaiian Electric vice president for energy resources and operations. “With the help of these resources and others, we reached a record 18% renewable energy percentage in 2013.”

The Solar Electric Power Association ranks Hawaii number one in the nation for solar watts per customer. At the end of 2013, over 40,000 solar installations across the three companies’ service territories had a combined capacity of about 300 megawatts.

To maintain reliable electric service for all customers, utility engineers must adjust the output of firm sources of generation up or down as the output from variable sources like solar and wind rises and falls throughout the day. The Hawaiian Electric Companies developed “Renewable Watch” to help system operators and engineers obtain information about the contribution of energy from the variable solar and wind resources.

“This information can help us integrate higher levels of renewable energy more effectively. Solar and wind power are increasingly important to our energy mix, so we need to understand when and how these resources affect our system,” Seu said.

Data from wind facilities and utility-scale solar facilities for “Renewable Watch” comes from utility system-monitoring equipment. Data for customer-sited solar power comes from regional estimates using solar sensors strategically placed throughout the islands and other sources.  Solar sensors monitor irradiance (the rate at which solar energy falls onto a surface) to help estimate the energy generated by thousands of PV systems across the island.

Displays of additional renewable resources will be added to “Renewable Watch” screens as they come online.

Counterfeit Bills Being Circulated in Puna – Bogus

Last night I went into the 7-11 store to take out cash from the cash machine and all of a sudden I hear the clerk saying really loud… “That’s a counterfeit bill… I can’t take that!”

Would you be able to tell this is a fake bill?

Would you be able to tell this is a fake bill?

I got up to the cash register and asked the clerk what just happened and she said someone tried to pass off another counterfeit $5.00 bill onto the store.  I said “another” and she turned to the other clerk on duty and he said it was like the second one that has been tried to be passed onto the store in the last week.  They also mentioned that even $1.00 bills were being counterfeited.

I asked the clerk if they called the police and she said no… the company doesn’t call the police as there is just too much paperwork to be filled out every time someone tries to pass one off.

I thought about this and then went to Paul’s Gas Station at the end of Pahoa Town and while I was paying for my gas there… I noticed they had a $5.00 bill taped to the wall.  I asked the lady at Paul’s Gas Station if they had also had any counterfeit bills being passed onto them… and she said yes.  Recently they have had quite a few people trying to pass on bogus bills and one even got through.

The clerk uses a pen to mark the bill to see if it is a fake bill.

The clerk uses a pen to mark the bill to see if it is a fake bill.

So if stores like 7-11 and Paul’s Gas Station are being targeted… I can only imagine what might be going on elsewhere.  I can only imagine a place like the Maku’u Farmers Market being a prime place for these folks to pass on these bogus bills to unsuspecting folks… and then perfectly innocent folks get caught up in trying to purchase something with them legally.

You can purchase pens that detect counterfeit bills online.

You can purchase pens that detect counterfeit bills online.

Be vigilant and realize that folks are passing $5.00 bills and $1.00 bills that are bogus around Pahoa right now and if you are a merchant… you may want to invest in a pen that can detect bogus bills.

 

Big Island Student Wins 2014 Hawaii State Spelling Bee… “P-L-A-N-G-E-N-C-Y””

Christianne Abella, an eighth grader at Konawaena Middle School on Hawaii Island, emerged as the 2014 champion of the aio Hawaii State Spelling Bee at PBS Hawaii Saturday night.

Christianne Abella

Christianne Abella

Christianne will represent Hawaii in the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. May 25-31. The national bee is televised live on ESPN.

Christianne’s winning word was “plangency” – the quality of a loud, resounding sound.

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO; Christianne Abella, 2014 aio Hawaii State Spelling Bee Champion; Susan Eichor, aio President and Chief Operating Officer

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO; Christianne Abella, 2014 aio Hawaii State Spelling Bee Champion; Susan Eichor, aio President and Chief Operating Officer

Runner-up Hope Kudo, another eighth grader from Hawaii Island, represented Kealakehe Intermediate School. She and Christianne were this year’s Hawaii Island co-champions.

The other 12 contestants were:

  1. Fred Adella of Waimea Canyon Middle School, Grade 6 – Kauai
  2. Kelly Brown of Ewa Makai Middle School, Grade 8 – Leeward Oahu
  3. John Griffin of Our Savior Lutheran School, Grade 6 – Central Oahu
  4. Susan Hasegawa of Iolani School, Grade 8 – Honolulu
  5. Katherine Hui of Iolani School, Grade 8 – Honolulu
  6. Reanna Inafuku of Hawaii Baptist Academy, Grade 7 – Windward Oahu
  7. Alisha Maake of Iroquois Point Elementary School, Grade 5 – Leeward Oahu
  8. Leila Nelson of Kapaa Middle School, Grade 7 – Kauai
  9. Nic Sarji of Aikahi Elementary School, Grade 5 – Windward Oahu
  10. Ameera Waterford of Emmanuel Lutheran School, Grade 6 – Maui
  11. Amalie Yach of Holy Family Catholic Academy, Grade 8 – Central Oahu
  12. Paul Yamane of Kamalii Elementary School, Grade 4 – Maui