Photography Is Not a Crime – Lawyer Threatens Me Over Today’s #WordlessWednesday Picture

Well once again I’m getting threatened by an attorney for something that seems ridiculous and I will ask this question now… Is taking photographs of cars and the signs that are on them illegal?

Earlier today, as I do on many Wednesdays, I posted a post entitled: “Wordless Wednesday – I Lost My Implants…” where I simply stated:  “I saw this truck parked at Island Naturals in Pahoa on the Big Island yesterday:” and then posted a picture of a truck that I saw parked at Island Naturals in Pahoa.

This afternoon I received an email from Honolulu Law firm WILLIAM J. NAGLE III, ESQ., Roeca Luria & Hiraoka LLP stating:

Mr. Tucker:

This firm represents Dr. ***********  in the matter of the photograph of the sign displayed on your blog dated 1/29/14.  We request that the photograph be removed from your blog (damontucker.com) as the contents of the sign are offensive to our client.  Because your blog is widely read on the Big Island, the photograph of the sign has disappointed and upset Dr. *********.
Mahalo for your kokua in this matter.

Well I don’t know what I should do really and feel that I have every right to post pictures I take in public.  I was just posting an observation I saw and really wasn’t making any statement other then it was “Wordless” in a sense.

I’ve left the blog post up… but have now removed the Doctors name from the picture.

IS PHOTOGRAPHY A CRIME?  Here is the incriminating photograph… minus the doctors name:

Dr. Who?

Dr. Who?

Big Island Police Arrest 61-Year-Old Man – Investigation of Bank Robbery Underway

Hawaiʻi Island police are investigating a bank robbery that took place Wednesday afternoon (January 29) in Hilo.

HPDBadge

At 1:42 p.m., South Hilo patrol officers responded to a report of a robbery at Central Pacific Bank on Kīlauea Avenue, where a man reportedly produced a note and fled with an undisclosed amount of cash.

The suspect, 61-year-old Lelome Kahaualoa Rogers, who has no permanent address, was located on Aupuni Street and arrested at 2:05 p.m. He is being held at the Hilo police cellblock while detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section continue the investigation.

Police ask anyone who witnessed the incident to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or contact Detective Joel Field at 961-2381 or jfield@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

The Bad Boys of Dance Returns to UH Hilo

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance performs once again at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center in one performance only on Tuesday, February 11 at 7:30 pm.

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance

“Back by popular demand, the Bad Boys of Dance is comprised of the most talented and versatile young male dancers in the world today,” said PAC Manager Lee Dombroski. “Each Bad Boy is selected based on his extraordinary physical abilities and artistry; the talent of the Bad Boys is unparalleled in the industry.”

Founded by the dance world’s very own Bad Boy Rasta Thomas, “we show the world what great male dancing looks like, and to make dancing fun, entertaining and accessible to a whole new generation.”

[youtube=http://youtu.be/BmOUdLzIYRg]

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $25 General, $20 Discount and $12 UH Students/Children. Box Office hours are Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. -1 p.m.

For more information and to purchase tickets, call 932-7490 or order online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Woman Arrested Man Sought in Robbery Incident Involving Hatchet

A Kaʻū woman has been arrested and a Kaʻū man is being sought in connection with a robbery involving a hatchet.

In response to a 9:22 a.m. call Sunday (January 26), Kaʻū patrol officers received a report that a 47-year-old Discovery Harbor woman walking near her parked car on South Point Road had been threatened with a hatchet by another woman who got out of a white Toyota sedan.

The two women scuffled and the victim was able to take the hatchet away and throw it into the brush on the side of the road. During the scuffle, the victim suffered a bite on the right forearm. A man then exited the Toyota, reached into the victim’s car and removed a bag containing a laptop, a cellular telephone and a wallet.

The male suspect fled in the Toyota after a passerby stopped to intervene. The female suspect entered the victim’s car and unsuccessfully attempted to start it. She then ran into the bushes.

Trinety Crapser

Trinety Crapser

Police investigation led to the identity of the female suspect. Monday afternoon (January 27), police arrested 25-year-old Trinety Crapser of Ocean View and took her to the Kona police cellblock while detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigations Section continued the investigation.

Tuesday (January 28), detectives charged Crapser with first-degree robbery, third-degree assault and unauthorized entry of a motor vehicle. Her bail was set at $62,000. She remained at the cellblock pending her initial court appearance Wednesday morning (January 29).

Kainoa Kahele-Bishop

Kainoa Kahele-Bishop

Police also want to question 23-year-old Kainoa Kahele-Bishop of Ocean View about this case. He is described as 5-foot-8, 160 pounds with black hair and brown eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or contact Detective Sean Smith at 326-4646, extension 262, or ssmith@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hawaiian Electric Industries Contributes $250,000 for Hokulea’s Historic Voyage

The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) and its related companies American Savings Bank,  Hawaiian Electric, Hawaii Electric Light and Maui Electric to support its historic voyage, Malama Honua (care for the Earth), a five-year, around-the-world odyssey by long-distance canoes Hokulea and Hikianalia.

PVS has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) to support Hokulea. Standing left to right are: Jenna Ishii (PVS), Nainoa Thompson (PVS), Rich Wacker (American Savings Bank), Connie Lau (HEI), Dick Rosenblum (Hawaiian Electric) and Clyde Namuo (PVS). Photo credit: Oiwi TV.

PVS has been awarded a five-year, $250,000 grant from Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) to support Hokulea. Standing left to right are: Jenna Ishii (PVS), Nainoa Thompson (PVS), Rich Wacker (American Savings Bank), Connie Lau (HEI), Dick Rosenblum (Hawaiian Electric) and Clyde Namuo (PVS). Photo credit: Oiwi TV.

HEI’s grant will help to document the voyage and collect, interpret and share scientific and cultural data for a global audience. While Hokulea is the traditionally navigated voyaging canoe using ancestral knowledge and signs of nature to navigate the ocean, Hikianalia is the ecologically friendly and high-tech support canoe powered by photovoltaic panels, electric motors and sails with satellite communications capability. The two vessels will bridge culture, tradition and indigenous knowledge with modern technology while they serve as platforms for exploration, communication and connection.

“We are proud to be a part of this extraordinary journey which will build relationships across the globe,” said Connie Lau, HEI president and CEO. “We applaud PVS for their efforts to foster culture, education, exploration and sustainability as we share the same commitment to make Hawaii and the world a better place for our children and generations to follow.”

American Savings Bank plans to further support Hokulea awareness and fundraising efforts in their marketing and public relations activities, as well as tie in to their Bank for Education program which promotes excellence in education. The Hawaiian Electric Companies also are partnering with PVS to raise awareness. The Companies are interested in the efforts of the solar- and wind-powered vessel Hikianalia which will capture and use data to provide curricula and lesson plans directly from the voyaging canoes to classrooms in Hawaii.

“We are grateful for the strong partnerships with individuals, businesses and organizations like Hawaiian Electric Industries who share our values and vision for the Worldwide Voyage,” said Nainoa Thompson, PVS president.  “HEI’s contribution will help assure a sustainable future that honors the health and well-being of our islands, oceans, culture and people.”

“Hokulea’s historic voyage reminds us of our host culture’s courage and knowledge as well as our willingness to embrace the future,” added Alan Oshima, president of HEI’s Charitable Foundation. “We think the attention that will be given to the two canoes and their crews will inspire us to overcome challenges, hopefully inspiring new leaders.  For these reasons, we are proud to support Malama Honua.”

Narissa Spies Identifies Rare Species of Coral Found Off The Big Island

A coral species new to the main Hawaiian Islands has been discovered in West Hawaii by a research team of the state Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Aquatic Resources divers, under the leadership of senior biologist Dr. Bill Walsh.

Table coral Acropora cytherea

Table coral Acropora cytherea

While doing reconnaissance SCUBA dives along the Kona coast of the Island of Hawaii, the dive team came across a large number of coral colonies, which none of the researchers had ever seen before. These robust finger-like colonies didn’t even look like they were related to any other corals in the vicinity of the main islands.

After returning the next day and photographically documenting the colonies, the coral was tentatively identified as Acropora gemmifera. Not only is this the first record of Acropora gemmifera in the main Hawaiian Islands, it’s the first record of any Acropora species occurring around the island of Hawaii.

table coral Acropora cytherea

Narrissa Spies of the Richmond Lab at the Kewalo Marine Laboratory identified it

Visual identification of the coral was subsequently confirmed by genetic sequencing done by Narrissa Spies of the Richmond Lab at the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, Pacific Biomedical Research Center in Honolulu.

“The presence of these coral colonies is a significant contribution to our understanding of local reef diversity and opens up speculation about what other rare corals may be found on the reefs of Hawaii island,” Walsh said.

Several Acropora species have been identified in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands; previously, several small colonies of the table coral Acropora cytherea have been reported from Kauai, and a single colony was recently sighted off Oahu.

table coral Acropora cytherea

The discovery of this rare species in the main Hawaiian Islands emphasizes the need for local marine and land-use conservation practices. Members of this genus have a low resistance and low tolerance to bleaching and disease, which can be made worse by pollution, overfishing, and climate change. They are also a coral species preferred by Acanthaster planci, the crown-of-thorns starfish, which is a coral predator.

Acropora gemmifera is common in shallow, tropical reef environments in the Red Sea, Australia, the Indo-Pacific, and central and western Pacific, but there are few records from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It does occur at Johnston Atoll, approximately 900 miles southwest of Hawaii.

There have been no historical reports of any Acropora species occurring around the Island of Hawaii nor were any observed in more than 4,500 DAR coral reef monitoring/research dives over the past 15 years.

Typically, this species is found intertidally and subtidally from 1 to 15 meters. The colonies can vary in color from tan/brown to green, blues and even purples. The Kona population is located in waters 4 to 10 meters deep and consists of tan/brown colonies ranging from young encrusting forms to mature colonies estimated to be at least 80 years old. A total of 75 A. gemmifera colonies were found at the Kona site along a 50-meter stretch of reef.

This finding was recently published online in the journal Coral Reefs.

Sixty-One Youths Participate in HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Hoops Clinic

Sixty-one youths participated in the HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Hoops Clinic for Elementary and Intermediate students held at the Panaʻewa play courts on January 11.

“We want to remind our youth and their parents to use their seat belts,” said Community Policing Officer Matt Kaaihue. “Each participant signed a pledge that they would always use their seat belt.”

Players were provided with instruction on basketball skills and placed on teams for competitive play. As part of the clinic, Officer Kaaihue also provided a presentation on attitude. “It all starts with your attitude, ” Kaaihue said. “Like an airplane, if our ‘nose’ is pointed up, we are taking off; if it is pointed down, we may be headed for a crash.”

Elementary Division(left to right) Row 1: Kamille Febo-Santiago, Keawe Silva, Jayla Tadeo-Jose, Guyson Ogata, Kayla Iwata, Shesley Martinez, Kiaʻi Apele. Row 2: Kaupena Yasso, Kelsie Imai, Makana Credo, Izayah Chartrand, Chance Simeona.

Elementary Division(left to right) Row 1: Kamille Febo-Santiago, Keawe Silva, Jayla Tadeo-Jose, Guyson Ogata, Kayla Iwata, Shesley Martinez, Kiaʻi Apele. Row 2: Kaupena Yasso, Kelsie Imai, Makana Credo, Izayah Chartrand, Chance Simeona.

Recognized for their outstanding performance, attitude and teamwork in the Elementary Division for fourth through sixth graders were Kamille Febo-Santiago, Keawe Silva, Jayla Tadeo-Jose, Guyson Ogata, Kayla Iwata, Shesley Martinez, Kia’i Apele, Kaupena Yasso, Kelsie Imai, Makana Credo, Izayah Chartrand and Chance Simeona.

Intermediate Division (left to right): Makana Kanehailua, Branden Pagala, Jerek Prudencio, Randon Arima, Maddy Jwang, Gabriel Braun, Dabney Uchima, Jordyn Mantz.

Intermediate Division (left to right): Makana Kanehailua, Branden Pagala, Jerek Prudencio, Randon Arima, Maddy Jwang, Gabriel Braun, Dabney Uchima, Jordyn Mantz.

Recognized for their outstanding performance, attitude and teamwork, in the Intermediate Division, seventh and eighth graders, were Makana Kanehailua, Branden Pagala, Jerek Prudencio, Randon Arima, Maddy Jwang, Gabriel Braun, Dabney Uchima and Jordyn Mantz.

For additional information on any Click It or Ticket or HI-PAL event, please call Lieutenant Darren Horio at 961-8121 or Officer Randy Morris at 326-4646, extension 258.

Wordless Wednesday – “I Lost My Implants…”

I saw this truck parked at Island Naturals in Pahoa on the Big Island yesterday:

Implants