Federal Worker to Eat Cow Ball for Charity During Government Shutdown

The following post first appeared on the HuffPost Hawaii Site:

After moving to Hawaii in 1993, I’ve had chances to eat things many folks don’t get an opportunity to on the mainland.

Unfortunately, I have a very weak stomach and I don’t take advantage of all the great foods that Hawaii has to offer. Whether a common food, such as raw fish, or a staple such as poi, I just can’t seem to stomach them.

Cow balls getting ready to be cooked.

Cow balls getting ready to be cooked.

The last few years I’ve been invited to the Big Island of Hawaii’s premier food and agriculture event, the Mealani Taste of the Hawaiian Range at the Hilton Waikoloa Village, where I’ve been able to sample and eat every part of a cow so far, except for, well… it’s BALLS, otherwise known as Rocky Mountain Oysters.

I don’t know why I’ve been so fearful of eating this part of a steer other then the thought of it pretty much disgusts me and churns my stomach. I’m sure I’ve probably had a few cow balls mixed in to my regular hamburger meat at times… it’s just I wouldn’t have known it.

I’ve always believed that if you have a fear of something, you should tackle that fear head-on. Why continue to live in fear of something when you can get over your fear and move past it?

I asked the following question to my friends on Facebook:

1. Have you ever eaten Rocky Mountain Oysters and what did they taste like to you?
2. If you had the chance to eat them in the past…. and didn’t eat them… why didn’t you?

Most of my friends said they tasted like chicken, but then I got this one comment from Leilehua Yuen: “I’ve eaten them prepared very well – tasted a bit like a cross between sweetbreads and brain. And I’ve eaten them prepared poorly – very salty and overcooked so they were too hard to chew. Both times, they had been breaded and deep-fried. Ono (good) with beer!”

Yes, Leilehua said, “BRAIN”!

As I said before, I have to move past my fears and I figured this year at the Taste of the Hawaiian Range I would volunteer to eat a Rocky Mountain Oyster if folks would pitch in for a non-profit charity. I will videotape my tasting and put it on my website.

"Snip"

“Snip”

I didn’t know what type of response I would get but then the offers to watch me choke down a cow ball started coming in. The local automobile magazine, Hawaii Motorhead was the first to pitch in so I offered them the opportunity to pick the non-profit and they have chosen The Food Basket, Inc. (a network that provides food for low income and homeless folks here on the Big Island of Hawaii).

After just a week of posting my offer to swallow down a cow ball and through generous contributions from Hawaii Motorhead, Craig Watanabe, Lucy Denise K. Mossman, Chris Henry, Dustin Acdal, Matt and Kehau Sproat (who don’t want to see the video as it’s too gross for them), Laura Kinoshita of Kinoshita Communications, Mahealani and Kevin Dayton as well as Mark Hinshaw I have now raised over $300 for the island’s food bank.

At the 18th Annual Taste of the Hawaiian Range, between 6-8 p.m. October 4, is where I will be filmed eating this cow ball… and yes, I will have a big glass of water next to me to wash it down. Wouldn’t it be funny if I actually ended up liking the “oyster”?

Thankfully Rocky Mountain Oysters are not the only thing on the menu as the “Taste” will offer 35 restaurants preparing numerous cuts of grass-fed beef–plus lamb, mutton, goat and feral and domestic pork.

And for all you vegetarians out there who I may have completely disgusted with this post, the Taste of the Hawaiian Range is not all about meat, although to this meat lover it seems like it at times but there will also be over 40 agriculture and educational booths for folks to peruse.

So I ask… how much money would it take for you to eat a Rocky Mountain Oyster?

Want to pitch in on this challenge?????

Kona Crime Prevention Committee Honors October Officer of the Month

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Officer Caroldeen “Nalani” Freitas as “Officer of the Month” for October in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (October 2) at Huggo’s restaurant in Kailua-Kona.

Officer Caroldeen “Nalani” Freitas

Officer Caroldeen “Nalani” Freitas

Freitas, a 10-year veteran of the Hawaiʻi Police Department, was honored for her tireless off-duty work running a non-profit organization that helps people in need.

Fifteen years ago, Freitas founded Kaʻanalike, which means “sharing,” and she spends her off-duty hours providing food, clothing, furniture, money and other items to families in need. Sergeant Grad Elarionoff, who nominated Freitas for the award, said Kaʻanalike perpetuates the Spirit of Aloha.

“Nalani chooses to serve the public while on duty and she chooses to serve the public while off duty,” Elarionoff said. “Just the daily efforts of receiving donations and dispersing them to the needy can be overwhelming but for 15 years Nalani has pushed forward, growing her network and providing needed services.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Freitas will be eligible for the next “Officer of the Year” award.

Senator Brian Schatz on the Government Shutdown – “Let Them Vote”

Sen. Brian Schatz

Sen. Brian Schatz

Aloha —

Let them vote.

It has been widely reported today that a majority of the Republicans in the House would vote for a clean spending bill if it came to the floor. Of course a majority of Democrats have already pledged to support a clean bill to end the shutdown.

That means that a bill to end the shutdown right now would pass with over 300 votes in the House. America is being held hostage by a fraction of the far right of the Republican Party.

So let’s let them vote.

Every member of Congress, Republican or Democrat, deserves the opportunity to vote so that their constituents know exactly where they stand. In the Senate we have already voted to pass a clean bill to end this shutdown, but Speaker Boehner won’t let the House vote on it.

So, on behalf of my colleagues in the House, I am starting a petition to tell Speaker Boehner to let them vote.

Everyday that this shutdown continues is hurting our economy, and putting hard working families at risk. Representatives in the House deserve the opportunity to show their constituents where they stand.

Sign your name to tell Speaker Boehner: Let them vote!

It’s past time to move forward. The House needs to vote, but they need to hear it from you. Join me today to tell Speaker Boehner: Let them vote!

Brian Schatz
U.S. Senator

Big Island Police Charge Kona Man (Again) With Theft of Pickup Truck From Kona Airport

A Kona man has been charged with two offenses in connection with the theft of a pickup truck from Kona International Airport at Keāhole.

Colvin Gaspar

Colvin Gaspar

Sometime over the weekend (September 28-29), a 2004 Toyota Tacoma was removed from a parking area at the airport.

Kona patrol officers located the truck Monday (September 30) down an embankment off Koloko Drive. Investigation led to the arrest of 21-year-old Colvin Gaspar of Kailua-Kona. He was taken to the Kona police cellblock while detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigations Section continued the investigation.

On Tuesday (October 1), detectives charged Gaspar with unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle and second-degree theft. His bail was set at $20,000. He remained at the cellblock until his initial court appearance Wednesday (October 2).

Big Island Police Searching for Couple Wanted for Questioning in Connection With a Robbery

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a couple wanted for questioning in connection with a robbery.

At 3 a.m. on August 6, a 26-year-old Hilo man was reportedly assaulted in the parking lot of Coconut Island and had his pickup truck stolen. The truck, a white 2006 Toyota Tacoma (license plate KYM 755) has not been located.

John Curtis K. Kuhia

John Curtis K. Kuhia

Police want to question 30-year-old John Curtis K. Kuhia and his wife, 36-year-old Shanna Y. L. Carvalho-Kuhia. Kuhia is described as 5-foot-9, 188 pounds with brown eyes and black hair. Carvalho-Kuhia is described as 5-foot-9, 300 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. Their last known address was in Mountain View.

Police ask anyone with information on there whereabouts or the location of the truck to contact Detective Robert Almeida at 961-2386 or ralmeida@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

DLNR Plans Lottery For Special Access Feral Cattle Control In Pu‘u ‘O‘o Area Of Hilo Restricted Watershed

The Department of Land and Natural Resources’ (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will be opening special access to Pu‘u ‘O‘o area of the Hilo Restricted Watershed for the control of feral cattle.

DLNR

Special access will be granted to one hunter group per Saturday beginning Nov. 16, 2013, and running through the end of March 2014. Hunters will be selected through a random lottery drawing to be held on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, at the East Hawai‘i DOFAW office at 19 E. Kawili St., in Hilo.

The deadline for applications is Friday, Oct. 18, 2013.

Applications may be obtained at both the East and West Hawai‘i DOFAW offices or online at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw.

These actions are pursuant to Hawai‘i Administrative Rules 13-124-7, Indigenous, Endangered, Threatened, and Injurious Wildlife, and Introduced Wild Birds, and as authorized by Hawai‘i Revised Statutes; 183-19 Exclusion of Livestock from Forest Reserves, Game Management Areas, and Public Hunting Areas and Title 13, Chapter 123, Unit D, Rules Regulating Game Mammal Hunting. Feral pigs and sheep may be hunted as usual. No dogs are allowed.

Special access will be temporarily granted into the Pu‘u ‘O‘o area of the Hilo Restricted Watershed BY PERMIT ONLY on the following dates:

  • Nov. 16, 23 and 30
  • Dec. 7, 14, 21 and 28
  • Jan. 4, 11, 18 and 25
  • Feb. 1, 8, 15 and 22
  • March 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29

Applications must consist of a minimum of five and maximum of 10 licensed hunters as a group. Applicants may only submit their name on a single application. Duplicate entries will be discarded. Results of the random lottery drawing will be made available at both the East and West Hawai‘i DOFAW offices, as well as online at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dofaw.

Selected applicants must confirm acceptance of their assigned hunt period by calling the East Hawai‘i DOFAW office at (808) 974-4221 no later than noon Wednesday preceding their assignment. Permits will be issued and/or validated at the entrance gate into Pu‘u ‘O‘o near the 22 mile marker along Daniel K. Inouye Highway (formerly Saddle Road) on the Saturday morning of the assigned hunt. If selected applicants decline or do not call to confirm by the deadline, then a stand-by group will be chosen from the original list of applicants who were not previously selected. Stand-bys will be notified by phone. No stand-bys waiting at the gates will be allowed.

Access to the Hilo Restricted Watershed will be provided at Pu‘u ‘O‘o and a 4×4 vehicle is required. ATVs will be allowed on the access roads and parking area. There will be a bag limit of two cattle of either sex per licensed hunter.

Interested persons wanting additional details regarding the feral cattle control program, application process and/or special accommodations, may contact Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221.