Historic F-104 Lands at the Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

The iconic Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, Serial No. 56-817, arrived at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor on May 9, 2013, joining the Museum’s ever-expanding collection. The Starfighter is on long-term loan from Museum of Aviation Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, and is the 43rd aircraft to join the Museum’s collection of historical and unique aircraft. It was transported by Pasha Hawaii and will be displayed in Hangar 79.

The iconic Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, Serial No. 56-817, arrived at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor on May 9, 2013, joining the Museum’s ever-expanding collection. The Starfighter is on long-term loan from Museum of Aviation Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, and is the 43rd aircraft to join the Museum’s collection of historical and unique aircraft. It was transported by Pasha Hawaii and will be displayed in Hangar 79.

The iconic Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, Serial No. 56-817, arrived at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor on May 9, 2013, joining the Museum’s ever-expanding collection. The Starfighter is on long-term loan from Museum of Aviation Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, and is the 43rd aircraft to join the Museum’s collection of historical and unique aircraft. It was transported by Pasha Hawaii and will be displayed in Hangar 79.

“This record-breaking aircraft has quite the history and we’re pleased to give it a new home,” said Museum Executive Director Kenneth DeHoff.

The Starfighter went into production in 1956 and was the first combat aircraft capable of easily sustaining twice the speed of sound. It held simultaneous world records for speed, altitude, and rate of climb. Due to its length of 54’ 9” and wingspan of only 21’ 11,” it was dubbed the Missile with a Man in It. The Starfighter served in the USAF from 1958 through 1975, as well as with several allied air forces around the world, including Japan.

Gen. Chuck Yeager famously displayed the “right stuff” during a high-altitude, record-breaking ascent in a rocket-assisted F-104, climbing to the edge of space at more than 100,000 feet.

f-104

The Museum invites donations of historic aircraft and aviation memorabilia. Donated artifacts are professionally cared for and enjoyed by millions of visitors from all over the world. The Museum also invites monetary donations for its Restoration and Education programs, as it is a nonprofit, private Museum, which depends on members and donors. To support the Museum, call 808-441-1006 or donate online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org.

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