Army to Host Additional Meeting on Marine Study

The U.S. Army is hosting an informational meeting, March 12, for community members interested in learning about the draft sampling and analysis plan to study marine resources at Makua Beach and surrounding areas.

Site Location Map

Site Location Map

The meeting will be held at Nanaikapono Elementary School Cafetorium (89-153 Mano Ave., Waianae, HI 96792) at 6:30 p.m.  Army subject matter experts will provide an overview of the marine resources study, the draft sampling and analysis plan and will explain the next steps in the process.

“The community expressed a desire for more information on this topic during our public meeting, February 20, and we are being responsive to that request,”  said Col. Daniel Whitney, commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii. “We welcome this opportunity – the more quality community input we have, the better this plan will be.”

The draft plan is a blueprint for how the Army will conduct the supplemental marine resources study to determine whether military activities at Makua Military Reservation have contributed or will contribute to contamination of the marine resources near Makua, and whether the proposed Army training activities at MMR pose a health risk to area residents who rely on these marine resources for food or other purposes.

The Army is currently accepting comments on this draft plan through March 22.

Draft Sampling

Community can view or download the plan online at www.garrison.hawaii.army.mil/makua (Click “2013 Draft MR Study” on the left side of the page.). The plan is also available at the Waianae, Kapolei and Waialua public libraries, under the title “Draft Supplemental Marine Resources Sampling and Analysis Plan, Makua Military Reservation, Oahu, Hawaii.” In consideration of the environment, hard copies of the plan are available upon request.

For more information or to provide comments, email usaghi.pao.comrel@us.army.mil or call (808) 656-3089.

The supplemental marine resources study was ordered by the Federal District Court June 20, 2012. The Army appreciates the community’s interest and involvement in this study.

Hakalau Farmer Named in Child Sex Abuse Lawsuit

He adopted and fostered boys in Hawaii and California, then victim charges man isolated boys and abused them.  There could be dozens of victims, group says.  New law allows victims to come forward, no matter when they were abused.

Media Release:

What: At a press conference, victims of sex abuse will announce and discuss a new sex abuse lawsuit against a former Hakalau farmer. The lawsuit alleges that Jay Ram:  Sexually abused the victim and other boys for five years, Isolated the boys from family, friends and peers, and Used the boys as forced child labor to develop the land

Victims will also: Urge anyone with information about Ram or his whereabouts to report, and  Beg other victims to come forward and get help

Where: Outside of Hilo’s Third Circuit Courthouse, Hale Kaulike, 777 Kilauea Avenue in Hilo

When: Monday, March 4 at 1 pm

On Friday, a Honolulu man filed a sex abuse lawsuit against a former Hakalau farmer who, he says, adopted him and then sexually abused him for more than five years. He also says the man used him and other boys as “forced child labor” to develop his land and kept them as virtual prisoners on his farm.

Jay Ram, who is also known as Gary Winnick, is also accused of sexually abusing other boys that he fostered and adopted in California and Hawaii.

This is not the first allegation against Ram. In 1992, another foster child came forward to report that Ram had sexually abused him. A little more than a year later, Ram was indicted for child sexual abuse. The charges were dropped in 1994. There were also allegations of physical abuse launched against Ram a few years earlier. Those allegations did not result in charges.

Jay Ram

Because the boys were taken out of his custody to be questioned, Ram went on to sue the State of Hawaii, Department of Human Services for removing the boys from his custody, the case eventually settled.

According to the lawsuit, Ram adopted the victim in California in 1983, when the boy, known as John Roe 8, was 10 years old. The victim had been in foster care for five years. In 1987, Ram moved the victim and other boys to a farm in Hakalau, where, the lawsuit alleges, “Jay Ram isolated the boy and his other adopted children, prohibiting them from visiting friends’ houses, having girlfriends and playing sports.” From 1984 to 1989, the suit also charges, Ram sexually abused the victim and other boys who lived with them.

During this time, Ram was involved in agricultural research with the University of Hawaii, Hilo.

SNAP believes there may be more victims suffering in silence.

“Jay Ram adopted vulnerable boys and used them for his sexual pleasure,” said Joelle Casteix, SNAP Western Regional Director. “Since the boys were so isolated, they had nowhere to go for help and were prisoners in a cycle of abuse they could not escape.”

The group also believes there may be witnesses, including researchers from UH who spent a great deal of time on the farm.

The victim in this case was able to come forward and expose Ram in the civil courts because of a landmark new state law that allows all Hawaii victims of child sexual abuse to come forward and seek justice in the courts, no matter when the abuse occurred.

Ram’s last known address was in Saipan. However, reports claim he may in India

The victims are represented by attorneys Mike Reck (714) 742-6593 mreck@andersonadvocates.com and Mark Gallagher (808) 779-5012 mgallagher@hawaiiantel.net. Copies of the lawsuit will be available at the event.

Contact:

IN HAWAII-Joelle Casteix of Newport Beach, CA (IN HONOLULU), SNAP Western Regional Director, (949) 322-7434 cell, jcasteix@gmail.com

Barbara Blaine of Chicago, IL, SNAP President, (312) 399-4747 cell, SNAPBlaine@gmail.com

Tim Lennon of San Francisco, CA, SNAP Bay Area Director, (415) 312-5820 cell, survivorsnetworksf@gmail.com

 

 

Translocation of Hawaiian Monk Seals From the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands to the Main Islands, Deferred

The Hawaiian monk seal research program permit application for conducting activities implementing the monk seal recovery program was published yesterday in the Federal Register.

Monk Seal Institute

The application has deferred for up to 5 years, the proposed translocation of juvenile monk seals from the NWHI to the main islands; the permit application specifically states “no seals would be moved from the NWHI to the MHI.” The merits of the translocation proposal have been debated for the last several years among marine scientists, ocean users and conservationists. (See: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/permits/monkseal16632.htm).

According to Trisha Kehaulani Watson, who represents the Marine Conservation Institute in Hawai‘i, the deferral was the appropriate move at this time but should be reconsidered for future permit applications based on the seal’s recovery progress over the next five years:

“Translocation of a few seals to the main islands, and then returning them to the NWHI as adults, was something NMFS wanted to try as an experiment to see if it could build up the subpopulation of seals in the NWHI which is currently declining.  It was a novel idea, and not everyone agreed it would work. But NMFS deserves credit for considering it as one measure to maintain the monk seal as part of Hawai‘i’s ‘ohana.  Translocations of individual seals within the main islands are allowed under the permit application, and we support these as necessary to protect their important role in Hawai‘i’s ecology and culture.  Moving seals within the MHI to appropriate locations where they can thrive will be an increasingly important tool as the population of monk seals continues to naturally increase in the main islands.”

“Frankly,” said Watson, “the Hawai‘i office of NMFS is in no position to finance an expensive translocation project right now because the agency’s budget for the monk seal recovery program has been cut by NOAA’s managers from around $5. 5 million in 2010 to roughly $3.5 million in 2012, and further cuts may be in the offing.  NMFS Hawai‘i cannot even pay for things it should be doing now like mounting effective outreach and volunteer programs, responding to the growing number of harmful human actions toward monk seals, and financing its scientific research projects, including its summer research camp in the NWHI.  The focus of the limited funds available needs to be on activities in Papahānaumokuākea and on managing the seal population currently in the main Hawaiian Islands.”

“If the people of Hawai‘i and across the United States want to see the monk seal properly managed and recovered,” she said, “they are going to have to ask their congressional delegation to intervene on the NOAA budget when it comes before the Congress this spring.” Watson noted that 30% of the seals seen alive today are alive because of interventions made by seal managers in Hawai‘i. “That’s a terrific record achieved by NMFS,” she said.

See our Monk Seal Fact Sheet for further information.

About Marine Conservation Institute

Marine Conservation Institute is a U.S. nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting marine ecosystems. We work with scientists, politicians, government officials and other organizations in the United States and around the world to fashion solutions to problems affecting marine ecosystems which are long lasting and compatible with sustainable ocean use. Honua Consulting represents Marine Conservation Institute in Hawai`i.