Decision Making on PLDC Bills to Come on Monday

The Committees on Water & Land (WAL) and Finance (FIN) heard 6 bills relating to the Public Land Development Corporation (PLDC). There was a large turnout for the hearing, with testimony being heard well into the afternoon. The Committees will reconvene for Decision Making Monday at 1:30pm in Conference Room 325.

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Following today’s public hearing, WAL Chair Cindy Evans (North Kona, North Kohala, South Kohala) said, “the public, in oral and written testimony, voiced its displeasure with the PLDC with an overwhelming number of people calling for repeal of the act. We will have our recommendation on the best way to move forward on Monday afternoon.”

A bill relating to public school redevelopment, which Governor Abercrombie personally delivered testimony on, was also heard at this morning’s hearing. WAL and FIN were joined by the Committee on Education to hear HB865. Decision Making on the bill was also deferred to Monday at 1:30pm.

Full Transcript of Manifesto Christopher Dorner Wrote Before His Rampage

Just posting the following so folks can see what was actually said on Christopher Dorner’s Manifesto instead of all the bits and pieces I’ve been hearing:

I know most of you who personally know me are in disbelief to hear from media reports that I am suspected of committing such horrendous murders and have taken drastic and shocking actions in the last couple of days. You are saying to yourself that this is completely out of character of the man you knew who always wore a smile wherever he was seen. I know I will be villified by the LAPD and the media. Unfortunately, this is a necessary evil that I do not enjoy but must partake and complete for substantial change to occur within the LAPD and reclaim my name. The department has not changed since the Rampart and Rodney King days. It has gotten worse. The consent decree should never have been lifted. The only thing that has evolved from the consent decree is those officers involved in the Rampart scandal and Rodney King incidents have since promoted to supervisor, commanders, and command staff, and executive positions.The question is, what would you do to clear your name?
Name;
A word or set of words by which a person, animal, place, or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.
Name Synonyms;
reputation, title, appellation, denomination, repute.
A name is more than just a noun, verb, or adjective. It’s your life, your legacy, your journey, sacrifices, and everything you’ve worked hard for every day of your life as and adolescent,young adult and adult. Don’t let anybody tarnish it when you know you’ve live up to your own set of ethics and personal ethos.
In 8/07 I reported an officer (Ofcr. Teresa Evans/now a Sergeant), for kicking a suspect (excessive force) during a Use of Force while I was assigned as a patrol officer at LAPD’s Harbor Division. While cuffing the suspect, (Christopher Gettler), Evans kicked the suspect twice in the chest and once in the face. The kick to the face left a visible injury on the left cheek below the eye. Unfortunately after reporting it to supervisors and investigated by PSB (internal affairs investigator Det. Villanueva/Gallegos), nothing was done. I had broken their supposed “Blue Line”. Unfortunately, It’s not JUST US, it’s JUSTICE!!! In fact, 10 months later on 6/25/08, after already successfully completing probation, acquiring a basic Post Certificate, and Intermediate Post Certificate, I was relieved of duty by the LAPD while assigned to patrol at Southwest division. It is clear as day that the department retaliated toward me for reporting Evans for kicking Mr. Christopher Gettler. The department stated that I had lied and made up the report that Evans had kicked the suspect. I later went to a Board of Rights (department hearing for decision of continued employment) from 10/08 to 1/09. During this BOR hearing a video was played for the BOR panel where Christopher Gettler stated that he was indeed kicked by Officer Evans (video sent to multiple news agencies). In addition to Christopher Gettler stating he was kicked, his father Richard Gettler, also stated that his son had stated he was kicked by an officer when he was arrested after being released from custody. This was all presented for the department at the BOR hearing. They still found me guilty and terminated me. What they didn’t mention was that the BOR panel made up of Capt. Phil Tingirides, Capt. Justin Eisenberg, and City Attorney Martella had a signigicant problem from the time the board was assembled. Capt. Phil Tingirides was a personal friend of Teresa Evans from when he was her supervisor at Harbor station. That is a clear conflict of interest and I made my argument for his removal early and was denied. The advocate for the LAPD BOR was Sgt. Anderson. Anderson also had a conflict of interest as she was Evans friend and former partner from Harbor division where they both worked patrol together. I made my argument for her removal when I discovered her relation to Evans and it was denied.
During the BOR, the department attempted to label me unsuccessfully as a bully. They stated that I had bullied a recruit, Abraham Schefres, in the academy when in reality and unfounded disposition from the official 1.28 formal complaint investigation found that I was the one who stood up for Abraham Schefres when other recruits sang nazi hitler youth songs about burning Jewish ghettos in WWII Germany where his father was a survivor of a concentration camp. How fucking dare you attempt to label me with such a nasty vile word. I ask that all earnest journalist investigating this story ask Ofcr. Abraham Schefres about the incident when Ofcr. Burdios began singing a nazi youth song about burning jewish ghettos.The internal affairs investigation in the academy involving Schefres was spurned by a complaint that I had initiated toward two fellow recruit/offifcers. While on a assigned patrol footbeat in Hollywood Division, Officers Hermilio Buridios IV and Marlon Magana (both current LAPD officers) decided that they would voice their personal feelings about the black community. While traveling back to the station in a 12 passenger van I heard Magana refer to another individual as a nigger. I wasn’t sure if I heard correctly as there were many conversations in the van that was compiled of at least 8 officers and he was sitting in the very rear and me in the very front. Even with the multiple conversations and ambient noise I heard Officer Magana call an indivdual a nigger again. Now that I had confirmed it, I told Magana not to use that word again. I explained that it was a well known offensive word that should not be used by anyone. He replied, “I’ll say it when I want”. Officer Burdios, a friend of his, also stated that he would say nigger when he wanted. At that point I jumped over my front passenger seat and two other officers where I placed my hands around Burdios’ neck and squeezed. I stated to Burdios, “Don’t fucking say that”. At that point there was pushing and shoving and we were separated by several other officers. What I should have done, was put a Winchester Ranger SXT 9mm 147 grain bullet in his skull and Officer Magana’s skull. The Situation would have been resolved effective, immediately. The sad thing about this incident was that when Detective Ty from internal affairs investigated this incident only (1) officer (unknown) in the van other than myself had statements constistent with what actually happened. The other six officers (John Carey, Gary Parker, Jacob Waks, Abraham Schefres and names I have forgotten) all stated they heard nothing and saw nothing. Shame on every one of you. Shame on Detective Ty (same ethnicity as Burdios) for creating a separate 1.28 formal complaint against me (Schefres complaint) in retaliation for initiating the complaint against Burdios and Magana. Don’t retaliate against honest officers for breaking your so called blue line. I hope your son Ryan Ty, who I knew, is a better officer than you, Detective Ty.The saddest part of this ordeal was that Officer Burdios and Magana were only given 22 day suspensions and are still LAPD officers to this day. That day, the LAPD stated that it is acceptable for fellow officers to call black officers niggers to their face and you will receive a slap on the wrist. Even sadder is that during that 22 day suspension Buridios and Magana received is that the LAPPL (Los Angeles Police Protective League) paid the officers their salaries while they were suspended. When I took a two day suspension for an accidental discharge, I took my suspension and never applied for a league salary. Its called integrity.
Journalist, I want you to investigate every location I resided in growing up. Find any incidents where I was ever accused of being a bully. You won’t, because it doesn’t exist. It’s not in my DNA. Never was. I was the only black kid in each of my elementary school classes from first grade to seventh grade in junior high and any instances where I was disciplined for fighting was in response to fellow students provoking common childhood schoolyard fights, or calling me a nigger or other derogatory racial names. I grew up in neighborhoods where blacks make up less than 1%. My first recollection of racism was in the first grade at Norwalk Christian elementary school in Norwalk, CA. A fellow student, Jim Armstrong if I can recall, called me a nigger on the playground. My response was swift and non-lethal. I struck him fast and hard with a punch an kick. He cried and reported it to a teacher. The teacher reported it to the principal. The principal swatted Jim for using a derogatory word toward me. He then for some unknown reason swatted me for striking Jim in response to him calling me a nigger. He stated as good Christians we are to turn the other cheek as Jesus did. Problem is, I’m not a fucking Christian and that old book, made of fiction and limited non-fiction, called the bible, never once stated Jesus was called a nigger. How dare you swat me for standing up for my rights for demanding that I be treated as a equal human being. That day I made a life decision that i will not tolerate racial derogatory terms spoken to me. Unfortunately I was swatted multiple times for the same exact reason up until junior high. Terminating me for telling the truth of a caucasian officer kicking a mentally ill man is disgusting. Don’t ever call me a fucking bully. I want all journalist to utilize every source you have that specializes in collections for your reports. With the discovery and evidence available you will see the truth. Unfortunately, I will not be alive to see my name cleared. That’s what this is about, my name. A man is nothing without his name. Below is a list of locations where I resided from childhood to adulthood.
Cerritos, CA.
Pico Rivera, CA.
La Palma, CA.
Thousand Oaks, CA.
Cedar City, UT.
Pensacola, FL.
Enid, OK.
Yorba Linda, CA.
Las Vegas, NV.
During the BOR an officer named, Sgt. Hernandez, from Los Angeles Port Police testified on behalf of the LAPD. Hernandez stated for the BOR that he arrived at the location of the UOF shortly before I cuffed the suspect. He also stated that he assisted in cuffing the suspect and that’s old the BOR he told me to fix my tie. All of those statements were LIES!!! Hernandez, you arrived at the UOF location up to 30 seconds after I had cuffed Mr. Gettler. All you did was help me lift the suspect to his feet as it was difficult for me to do by myself because of his heavy weight. You did not tell me to fix my tie as the BOR members and everyone else in the room know you lied because the photographic evidence from the UOF scene where Gettler’s injuries were photographed clearly shows me wearing a class B uniform on that day. A class B uniform is a short sleeved uniform blouse. A short sleeved uniform blouse for the LAPD does not have a tie included. This is not Super Troopers uniform, you jackass. Why did you feel the need to embellish and lie about your involvement in the UOF? Are you ashamed that you could not get hired on by any other department other than port police? Do you have delusions of grandeur? What you did was perjury, exactly what Evans did when she stated she did not kick Christopher Gettler…

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Fire Training at the Kona International Airport with Geoff Mackley

Video blog of yesterday’s activities at the Kona International Airport via the Kona Fire Rescue team starting with a point of view response to a code 3 of 5000 liters of aviation fuel on fire and finishing with a return drive to the station up the main runway of Kona International Airport yesterday, February 8th, 2013.

Off The Fence Productions for the Weather Channel series “Masters of Nature”.  Be sure to watch it !

 

Community Mobilized to Help Fight Serious Coffee Pest

Community support is being asked for the fight against the coffee berry borer (CBB), the worst production risk faced by coffee growers in Hawai‘i today. CBB was first discovered in South Kona in August 2010 and has since spread rapidly. At present all of Kona is considered infested, and the pest has also been found in the neighboring Ka‛u coffee-growing areas. As with many other invasive species, it may be only a matter of time before all Hawai‘i coffee-growing regions become infested by this beetle. Some growers have reported near-100% losses due to CBB, and the industry will not survive if this pest cannot be controlled.
Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei)

Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei)

This past January, twenty-four agricultural professionals met for a two-day “Ag Professionals Coffee Berry Borer Summit: CBB Integrated Pest Management Methods and Protocols for Hawai‘i” at the USDA Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC) in Hilo and UH Mānoa’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) Kona Cooperative Extension Service.

Participants included researchers, entomologists, extension specialists and agents from CTAHR, PBARC, and the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture (HDOA); coffee industry leaders; and those teaching or advising coffee farmers. The goal of the summit was to organize a standard protocol or management strategy based on best available information to present to those in the industry, targeting better control to reduce infestation levels. The event was organized by Andrea Kawabata and Stuart T. Nakamoto of  CTAHR’s Risk Management Hawaiʻi (RMH) and Local and Immigrant Farmer Training (LIFE) programs.

The goal of the summit was for scientists and the industry to establish an agreed-upon and updated protocol to help reduce growers’ confusion about more efficiently combating CBB in Hawai‘i. The standard protocol for growers to manage CBB emphasizes field sanitation, sampling and monitoring, timely harvesting, effective processing, strict quarantine procedures, and spraying of HDOA-approved fungal biocontrol Beauveria bassiana products. Although many of these recommendations have been provided to Hawai‘i coffee growers since 2010, new information is continuously forthcoming from researchers, growers, and external sources. Updated recommendations will be made available to the industry, including coffee growers and processors, and to the public.

Growers are encouraged to be proactive by staying informed, responsive, and connected. It is suggested they join a local coffee organization. To join the CTAHR extension coffee contact list and receive information about the CBB Integrated Pest Management Methods and Protocols for Hawai‘i and other coffee-related events, contact Gina Bagarino at 808-322-4892 or email ginab@hawaii.edu. When the new CBB Integrated Pest Management Protocol becomes available in the coming weeks, growers should implement its recommendations.

Processors can support growers who are controlling CBB by implementing a sliding scale payment system, so that those who actively manage their coffee farms are rewarded for their good husbandry with top dollar. Summit participants suggest processors avoid paying for coffee cherry with cash—according to law enforcement officials, cash payments of agricultural products may promote thievery.

Consumers can support the local coffee industry and sustainable agriculture by purchasing coffee grown and processed in Hawai‘i and by visiting coffee farms and estates to learn from the farmers about their dedication and commitment to growing Hawai‘i’s superb, world-renowned coffee.

To learn more about RMH/LIFE and events provided by Team LIFE, please visit http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/life/.

 

UH Hilo Professor – “Too Much Love at Kamilo”

Commentary by UH Hilo Professor Jonathan Price:

Petroglyphs speak of the people who once made this their home. Nohu and Nehe decorate the shoreline, and it is the only place where Naio Pāpā is found at all. Today Kamilo in the Ka‘ū district of the Big Island stands as one of few remote coastlines that have been spared the toll of our modern society… until last month, that is.

Burned Naupaka patch (last year). Photo by M. Lamson.

Burned Naupaka patch (last year). Photo by M. Lamson.

The Rainbow Family of Living Light”, despite calling themselves a “non-organization”, coordinated a gathering using a website, a Facebook page, and a clearly-organized effort. People flew in from the mainland and knew precisely where to go, even at this remote site, which is only accessible by four-wheel drive. A complex of campsites was set up for well over a week, culminating on the night of the most recent full moon, where hundreds gathered. It is difficult to say how many showed up, but their Facebook page listed over 200 as attending, and it is certainly possible that additional “unplugged” people added to the mix. This is also not the first time that a gathering has occurred here. Being state land, of course there are rules that apply, and yet the Rainbow Family cites the U.S. constitution’s freedom to assemble and their own professed love of nature as reasons why the rules do not apply to them. In any event, the public has a right to know what occurred, in the interest of determining whether this is how we want our public lands to be treated.

Camp materials left behind (last year). Photo by M Lamson

Camp materials left behind (last year). Photo by M Lamson

First, the natural splendor of the site has undoubtedly been compromised. The most comfortable camping spots are within a stand of Milo trees near the shoreline (hence the name Kamilo), but in order to make room for hundreds of people, the undergrowth was heavily cut using chainsaws. Fire is a popular ingredient at these gatherings, and so massive amounts of wood were collected to feed these. However fire is difficult to control: at last year’s gathering a fire spread through a field of Naupaka, badly damaging the native vegetation. A huge input of nutrients from hundreds of people’s feces and urine (even when buried) will surely make its way into the shallow waters nearby and threaten the health of an otherwise high-quality coral reef ecosystem. Large amounts of rubbish further degrade the austere beauty of the area. Generally, a week with this kind of population density would wreak havoc in just about any natural area.

A living Milo tree that was cut (this year). Photo by C Spina

A living Milo tree that was cut (this year). Photo by C Spina

More disturbing however, is a general absence of understanding about the cultural history of this place. Like many coastal areas, it abounds in cultural artifacts and archaeological sites. An enormous pit to dispose of human waste may seem like the logical and sanitary thing to do, but it really just demonstrates an utter vacuum of awareness or respect. I can’t say what may lie beneath the soil, but neither can they, and it is best not to disturb such places. Other documented impacts include moving coral “white rocks” to mark paths so everyone can see the petroglyphs, shuffling stones around to mark fire pits and campsites, and generally disturbing the area.

Trampled native vegetation (this year). Photo by C. Spina.

Trampled native vegetation (this year). Photo by C. Spina.

Unfortunately, after several Rainbow Family events, the State has demonstrated little ability to enforce the rules that prohibit gatherings of more than 25 people and altering the natural character of the land (http://www.hawaiistateparks.org/pdf/administrative_rules/13-7.pdf). To be fair, this was organized with little warning, resulting in a quickly swelling crowd; DOCARE, DLNR’s enforcement arm that is charged with regulating hunting, fishing, and all other activities on State lands, has merely a handful of officers for the entire island. Nonetheless, better coordination among DOCARE, DLNR’s Land Division, and private landowners (whose land is traversed to access the area) could prevent such a gathering from happening here or any other comparably sensitive area.

Lua for the masses (this year). Photo by M Lamson.


Lua (bathroom) for the masses (this year). Photo by M Lamson.

The answer is not to prevent anyone from accessing Kamilo; fishermen and others access the site in small numbers with far less impact, and a group of dedicated volunteers working through the Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund have regularly organized coastal cleanups. But as the Rainbow Family has shown time and again around the country, too many people can simply “love a place to death”.

Jonathan Price
Dept. of Geography and Environmental Studies
University of Hawai’i at Hilo