Organic Chemical Found in Kauai Water Tank – State Officials Taking Action to Protect Purity of Water

An oily sheen containing a chemical contaminant has been found in a drinking water reservoir in Princeville on Kauai. Results from extensive laboratory testing have determined water distributed from the drinking water system does not pose a health threat and continues to be safe. The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) and the Princeville Utilities Company Inc. (PUCI) are taking immediate action to protect the purity of the water and the health of residents who depend on it.

Princeville

On Oct. 16, following routine sampling of drinking water systems across the state, DOH found that minute trace amounts of the organic chemical Aroclor 1254, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), may have been present in a Princeville water system tank on Kauai. The water system tank serves a population of about 1,700 people.

The DOH directed PUCI, owner and operator of the Princeville water system, to conduct testing to determine if PCBs were present and to identify the possible source of contamination.

PUCI sent water samples collected on Oct. 23 and 24 to CalScience Laboratory in California for testing. PCBs were not detected at the tank’s compliance sampling point where water exits at the bottom of the tank, nor at the two wellheads that supply the tank. The DOH collected and tested weekly samples at the compliance sampling point and throughout the distribution system Nov. 14, 19 and 27 and Dec. 4. No PCBs were detected in the samples analyzed by the state Laboratories Division.

“Fortunately, our follow up testing indicates that PCBs are not found in the water that reaches people’s homes,” said Gary Gill, Deputy Director for Environmental Health. “Our Safe Drinking Water Branch is maintaining active surveillance of the distribution system and will continue to monitor and test the water being served to consumers to ensure that the public is protected.”

While PCBs were not detected in the two wellheads, at the tank’s compliance sampling point, nor within the distribution system, the DOH on Nov. 8 learned that PCBs were detected in an oily sheen sample skimmed from the surface of the tank water at 18 parts per billion (ppb). Since water exits from the bottom of the tank and PCBs do not dissolve well in water, this does not represent a health threat. As a precaution, additional water testing is continuing and PUCI is removing the oily sheen from the tank water surface. On Nov. 30, subsequent sampling and testing confirmed the presence of PCBs in the surface sheen at 1.38 ppb. Sampling on Dec. 6 revealed the concentration of PCBs in a skim sample was 1.4 ppb. For more information on PUCI’s mitigation measures, contact Mike Loo at (808) 826-6100.

The source of the oily sheen is still undetermined. Upon findings of PCBs in the oily sheen sample, PUCI immediately took Well #1, an oil-lubed well, out of service. PUCI tested previously used and currently used pre-lube oils used to lubricate Well #1. On Nov. 30, PUCI confirmed that neither of these oils contains PCBs. Well #2 is water-lubed and therefore was not at issue.

The federal and state Maximum Contaminant Level for PCBs is 0.5 ppb at the compliance sampling point. The standard is set to avoid health risks based on a lifetime of consuming water containing that level of contaminant. PCBs are a group of organic chemicals formerly used in the United States in hydraulic fluids, plasticizers, adhesives, fire retardants, and de-dusting agents. PCBs do not dissolve well in water. To date, the Princeville water system is in compliance with federal and state PCB standards for drinking water.

Mayor Kenoi Mourns the Passing of Senator Daniel K. Inouye

Mayor Billy Kenoi and the people of the County of Hawai‘i mourn the passing of United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye, a war hero, distinguished president pro-tempore of the United States Senate, and an effective advocate for the people of Hawai‘i for more than five decades.

Hawai‘i County Mass Transit Agency Director Tom Brown, left, and Mayor Billy Kenoi, accept a Federal Transit Agency check representing $7.2 million from U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye to fund mass transit improvements in the County of Hawai‘i.

Hawai‘i County Mass Transit Agency Director Tom Brown, left, and Mayor Billy Kenoi, accept a Federal Transit Agency check representing $7.2 million from U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye to fund mass transit improvements in the County of Hawai‘i.

“Beyond the titles, beyond the power and the influence, what most stands out is his thoughtfulness, his kindness and how he treated everyone with respect and aloha,” Mayor Kenoi said. “I will never forget that lesson.”

Many of Hawai‘i’s leaders walked through Senator Inouye’s office – including Mayor Kenoi, who worked as an intern in Inouye’s office in the summer of 1992. “He gave me opportunity, and he supported me every step of the way,” Mayor Kenoi said. “I look to him with the same respect, honor and love that I feel for my parents.”

“Senator Inouye was a friend and a mentor to generations of public servants. He always encouraged all of us to fight for what we believe in, to stand up for what is right, and most importantly, to give everything we have to serve the people of Hawai‘i,” Mayor Kenoi said. “He taught all of us how to conduct ourselves as public servants.”

Senator Inouye was a leader who embodied the best of yesterday, who served our community the best he could every day, and who was always mindful of tomorrow, of future generations, Mayor Kenoi said.

“He was a tireless advocate for the people of Hawai‘i. Takako and I, our family, and our community are honored and privileged to have had him as a part of our lives.”

 

Pahoa Man Arrested in Connection with Nanawale Estates Murder

Police arrested a 36-year-old Pāhoa man in connection with a murder in the Nanawale Estates Subdivision in Puna.

HPDBadgeMonday morning (December 17) at 10:35 a.m., Jason Russell Jump was arrested without incident in Pāhoa. He is being held in the Hilo police cellblock on suspicion of second-degree murder.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending notification of next of kin.

An autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday morning (December 18) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information on this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

RIP Senator Daniel Inouye

Senator Daniel Inouye has passed away at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, his office confirms.

Senator Daniel Inouye passed away this morning

Senator Daniel Inouye passed away this morning

United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye, World War II veteran, Medal of Honor recipient and Hawaii’s senior Senator, passed away from respiratory complications at 5:01 p.m. Eastern Standard Time today at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

His wife Irene and his son Ken were at his side. Last rites were performed by Senate Chaplain Dr. Barry Black.

He is survived by his wife, Irene Hirano Inouye, his son Daniel Ken Inouye Jr., Ken’s wife Jessica, and granddaughter Maggie and step-daughter Jennifer Hirano. He was preceded in death his first wife, Maggie Awamura.

Senator Inouye’s family would like to thank the doctors, nurses and staff at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for the extraordinary care he received.

The story of Dan Inouye is the story of modern Hawaii. During his eight decades of public service, Dan Inouye helped build and shape Hawaii.

Senator Inouye began his career in public service at the age of 17 when he enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after Imperial Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He served with ‘E’ company of the 442 Regimental Combat Team, a group consisting entirely of Americans of Japanese ancestry. Senator Inouye lost his arm charging a series of machine gun nests on a hill in San Terenzo, Italy on April 21, 1945. His actions during that battle earned him the Medal of Honor.

Following the war he returned to Hawaii and married Margaret “Maggie” Awamura, and graduated from the University of Hawaii and the George Washington University School of Law.

After receiving his law degree, Dan Inouye, returned to Hawaii and worked as a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for the City and County of Honolulu. He recognized the social and racial inequities of post-war Hawaii, and in 1954 was part of a Democratic revolution that took control of the Territorial Legislature.

Following statehood in 1959, Dan Inouye was privileged to serve as Hawaii’s first Congressman. He ran for the Senate in 1962 where he served for nearly nine consecutive terms.

Dan Inouye spent his career building an enduring federal presence in Hawaii to ensure that the state would receive its fair share of federal resources. He worked to expand the military’s presence on all major islands, stabilizing Pearl Harbor, building up the Pacific Missile Range and constructing a headquarters for the United States Pacific Command.

He has worked to build critical roads, expanded bus services statewide and secured the federal funds for the Honolulu Rail Transit project. He championed the indigenous rights of Native Hawaiians and the return of Kahoolawe.

He fought for the rights and benefits for veterans. Senator Inouye has left an indelible mark at the University of Hawaii, including support for major facilities and research assets. He has long supported local agriculture and alternative energy initiatives.

Dan Inouye was always among the first to speak out against injustice whether interned Japanese Americans, Filipino World War II veterans, Native Americans and Native Hawaiians.

A prominent player on the national stage, Senator Inouye served as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, the Senate Commerce Committee and was the first Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

After developing a reputation as a bipartisan workhorse, who always would put country above party, he was asked by the Senate leadership to chair the special committee investigating the Iran Contra Affair. This was after a successful tenure as a member of the Watergate Committee.

When asked in recent days how he wanted to be remembered, Dan said, very simply, “I represented the people of Hawaii and this nation honestly and to the best of my ability. I think I did OK.”

His last words were, “Aloha.”

Big Island Police Searching for 17-Year-Old Hilo Boy Missing Since October

Hawaiʻi County police are searching for a 17-year-old Hilo boy reported as missing from Hilo since October 13.

Pat Enos

Pat Enos

Pat Enos is described as Hispanic, 5-foot-6, 150 pounds with short black hair and brown eyes.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona.

 

Big Island Police Looking for Man With “Jesus” Tattoo Across Forehead

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating a 36-year-old Puna man wanted for questioning following the discovery of a body in a residence in Nanawale Estates.
HPDBadge
Jason Russell Jump is described as an African American, about 6-foot-1 to 6-foot-2 with brown eyes, shoulder-length black dreadlocks, and a tattoo saying “Jesus” across his forehead.

Detectives would like to speak with Jump in connection with this incident.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending positive identification and notification of next of kin.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation, which is classified as a second-degree murder, and have not identified Jump as a suspect at this time.

An autopsy is scheduled for Monday morning (December 17) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information on this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

Big Island Police Open Murder Investigation Following Body Found in Puna

Police have opened a murder investigation following the discovery of a body in Puna.

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Sunday (December 16) at about 5:08 p.m., police responded to a call of a male victim with an apparent head injury in the Nanawale Estates subdivision. Officers discovered the deceased victim in his residence and secured the scene for detectives.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending positive identification and notification of next of kin.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation, which is classified as a second-degree murder.

An autopsy is scheduled for Monday morning (December 17) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information about this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.