Lance Armstrong Kicking It in Hawaii

Well TMZ is reporting that Lance Armstrong is in Hawaii and I just checked his twitter account and it does appear that he is here now:

Despite all the recent controversy, Lance Armstrong got back on his bike and pedaled around Hawaii while on vacation. His life just seems to keep getting worse and worse, right?

[youtube=http://youtu.be/ZkXJYGwJNWk]

I wonder if he’s staying on the Big Island like he normally does?

Raw, Fermented Foods Workshop Nov. 10

Probiotic, Lacto-fermented. What’s it all mean?

Find out how tasty fermented and raw foods can contribute to wellness at a three-hour, cutting-edge workshop Saturday, Nov. 10 at Island Naturals Market and Deli-Kailua.

Benjamin Cohn, fermented and raw food specialist at Honaunau’s Dragonfly Ranch, discusses “Raw and Ferment Foods: Their Role in Healing, Health and Well-being” 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The informative program includes a raw food lunch and admission is by donation. Registration is at 9:45 a.m.; coffee and tea will be served.

The workshop is presented by the Women’s Federation for World Peace-Hawaii. WFWP is a global organization that empowers women with knowledge, skills and supportive community to learn their unique value and bring lasting peace. It is co-sponsored by The Pacific Rim Education Foundation (PREF) and Hawaiian Queen Coffee Company.

The workshop will explain the benefits of raw, “living” food and share why fermented foods can improve digestion through a balancing of bacteria and enzymes. Cole will detail the important connection between fermented foods and vitamin B12 and delve into sprouting food and the proper use of kitchen tools during food preparation. He will also demonstrate how to prepare raw and fermented foods in a tasty and appealing way so they can be easily integrated into your lifestyle.

Reservations are appreciated to Betsy, 808-987-6510 or wfwp.kona@gmail.com. Island Naturals is located at 74-5487 Kaiwi Street in the Old Industrial Area.

PREF: The Pacific Rim Education Foundation sponsors educational programs, funds charitable activities and supports practices that nurture love, wisdom and peace within individuals and families, which promote understanding and connectedness among communities, and which foster wise care for the Earth. PREF is funded by the Hawaiian Queen Coffee Company (HQC); the Unification Church, founded by the late Reverend Sun Myung Moon; and by individual donors. For information, visit www.prefpeace.org or email PrefPeace@gmail.com.

 

County of Hawai‘i Non-Profit Grants Informational Meetings

Councilmember Brittany Smart will host informational meetings for all non-profits (must be 501c3) interested in applying for a grant from the County of Hawai‘i to discuss recent Hawai‘i County Code changes and how it will affect the application process.

A representative from the Department of Finance will be available to assist in explaining the code changes from Bill 287, Draft 3 (passed October 2012). All completed applications must be submitted and received by the Department of Finance by 4:30pm on Thursday January 31, 2013.

The meetings will be November 15th at 10:00AM in Hilo at the County of Hawai‘i Council Chambers (25 Aupuni Street) and November 16th at 10:00AM in Kona at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center, Building G (74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy).

Any questions, please call Jenny at (808) 961-8536 or email district6@co.hawaii.hi.us.

 

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 47-Year-Old Puna Man

Big Island police are asking for the public’s help in locating a 47-year-old Puna man who was reported missing.

Robert Allen Park

Robert Allen Park is described as Hawaiian, about 5-foot-7, about 230 pounds with a stocky build, a bald head, brown eyes and a tan complexion. He may be in need of medical attention.

He was last seen around 2:30 p.m. on October 22 at a home on Pikake Street in Mountain View.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Commentary on Tsunami Sirens by Councilman Pete Hoffmann – “The Sounds of Silence”

Councilman Pete Hoffman

Councilman Pete Hoffmann

Last Saturday evening, we were visited once again by a frequent, if not welcomed, visitor, i.e. the threat of a tsunami. This was the third such event in the past 32 months and permitted island residents and agencies to participate in what is fast becoming an island staple, “the annual evacuation drill”. Fortunately, the threat remained exactly that. Some Saturday night festivities and events were cancelled or curtailed, many took to the roads seeking higher ground, others raced to the gas stations and local markets to ‘top off’ or stock-up (on what I’m not certain??), evacuation centers were opened, and in general residents displayed a growing non-chalance that is becoming part of the fabric of life on an island in the Pacific Ocean.

For the most part, our County first responders, Civil Defense, CERT volunteers and others performed with a degree of professionalism that comes from repeated ‘drills’. There will always be problems of some kind, and glitches will occur no matter how often the system is exercised. However, I agree with Mayor Kenoi when he notes that County personnel accomplished tasks in an outstanding fashion.

So am I the only one who remains concerned about our preparedness? In the rush to ‘pat ourselves on the back for a job well done’ I continue to question why considerable portions of our coastline with sizeable developments do not have any tsunami sirens. Why is it that after two previous tsunamis, some resort areas do not have a single siren in place? Didn’t we stress this danger last year and the year before?? Didn’t it take some legislative arm-wrestling to convince County officials that some zoning regulations need to be introduced to insure residents in those areas, most vulnerable to a tsunami have sufficient warning? Wasn’t the County supposed to follow-up with State officials to insure this situation doesn’t happen? Doesn’t this fall within the public health and safety mandates of our County government?? Despite the obvious dangers, Tsunami #3 came and there remain too many built up areas that lack a siren capability.

Do not misunderstand. A functioning siren system may not be the only or even the best warning capability. It takes, I believe, a combination of several components to provide our residents an effective early warning structure. My fear is that for some on our island, particularly along our coastlines, a siren is a critical ingredient that must be operational to provide the broad coverage so necessary for public safety. The silence along some portions of our coast is truly deafening.

Consider for a moment the timeframe involved: the February 2010 event allowed us 13+ hours lead time. The March 2011 event permitted us a seven hour warning. Last Saturday’s exercise cut that time to three hours. Does anyone see a pattern here?? My concern is that the next event may allow the County perhaps one hour or less to evacuate large numbers of people from our coastline. And knowing that our luck may finally run out, it will be in the dead of night when the visitor count is high and our snow-birds are here.

Before we “pat ourselves on the back” too much, we must return to basics. We are not as prepared as we think we are if sirens remain absent from many vulnerable areas. We are fooling ourselves if we think we are ready. We must make this deficiency a persistent and vocal objective of our County government now, not in the short-term, but immediately. Enough talk and promises. Solutions are required now and if sirens are lacking, some effective alternative must be put in place. This public health and safety shortfall cannot be permitted to exist when our next “annual tsunami drill” occurs. The sounds of silence must not continue.

Pete Hoffmann

22-Year-Old Man Arrested for Stealing Gas

A 22-year-old man has been arrested for stealing gasoline from a business.

Norton Castro

Gasoline was stolen from a warehouse in Pāpaʻikou at 5:30 p.m. Sunday (October 28). A video surveillance camera on the property caught the suspect returning at 11:37 p.m. and attempting to steal gasoline again.

Norton Castro of Pepeʻekeo was arrested Monday morning (October 29) and later charged with two counts of second-degree burglary and one count of third-degree theft. His bail was set at $4,500.

He was held at the Hilo police cellblock until his initial court appearance on Tuesday (October 30).

Police Investigating Break-Ins During Tsunami Evacuations

Big Island police are investigating several break-ins that took place in the Keaukaha area of Hilo during the tsunami evacuation Saturday night (October 27).

Eight residential burglaries were reported on Kalanianaʻole Avenue. Police are investigating each one as a “burglary of a dwelling during a civil defense emergency,” which is a Class A felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison.

Police ask that anyone with information about these burglaries (or anyone who didn’t evacuate and saw suspicious persons in the area) call Sergeant James Correa at 961-2289 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Arbor Day Events Feature Native, Non-Native Plants for Sale

Celebrate Arbor Day in Hawaii and “go green” by purchasing and planting a native plant from the Arbor Day plant sale on Friday, November 2 at Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) nurseries on the Big Island.

Planting a native plant celebrates the forests that are fundamental to our way of life. Hawaii’s native forests provide the islands’ water supply by absorbing large quantities of moisture from passing clouds and rainfall. These watershed forests reduce greenhouse gases and flooding, erosion, and siltation of reefs and fisheries. Native plants also have cultural significance, regarded as elders and ancestors, or used for medicines, offerings, or other material needs.

Learn more about these incredible and unique plants at the Big Island sale, held in two locations, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. In Hilo the plant sale is at the DOFAW baseyard at 19 E. Kawili St. (corner of Kawili St. and Kilauea Ave.). Phone 974-4221. In Kamuela, the sale is at the DOFAW Kamuela office at 66-1220A Lalamilo Road. Call 887-6061.

A few of the native species that will be available are: koa, koai‘a, ohia, hame, kokio (hibiscus), alahe‘e, pohinahina, sandalwood, and loulu. A few of the non-native species that will be available are: puakenikeni, Sugi pines, ylang ylang, gardenia, shower tree, and Podocarpus.

The cost of plant species will range from $1 each for dibble tube seedlings to $15 each for 3-gallon pots. There are no limits on quantities purchased and all sales are on a cash only basis. Plant sales will feature both native and non-native plants raised at DOFAW nurseries that are popular with gardeners and landscapers. Proceeds will be used to support nursery operations and forest management.