Big Island Magazine “Ke Ola” Tapped Among Statewide Fastest 50 Businesses

Ke Ola magazine has achieved lucky position #13 on the 2012 Hawaii’s Fastest 50 list, presented by Pacific Business News. The list is compiled by percentage of growth from 2009 to 2011 and the Hawai‘i Island publication comes in at 179% growth. Since it’s December 2008 launch, the 100-page, four-color glossy magazine has nearly tripled in size. It comes out bi-monthly, with six issues per year.

“We are very proud to have earned this benchmark and to be in the upper quadrant of the list is amazing,” says Publisher Barbara Garcia. “It would not have been possible without the support of Hawai‘i Island businesses, who understood our vision from the beginning.”Garcia adds that she knew the Big Island was ready for its own arts, culture and lifestyle magazine. Ke Ola, meaning “The Life,” is organized into sections with articles featuring The Life of the Land, Culture, People, Art, Home, Music and Business. Topics are geared for island residents and those worldwide that have a special connection to Hawai‘i Island. Writers, artists, photographers and authors all live on the Big Island. The publication is distributed free at over 300 locations on the island, and subscriptions are available via First Class mail worldwide and on their website, www.keolamagazine.com.

Ke Ola is honored to be counted among the other 49 Fastest 50 businesses, including the following Hawai‘i Island-owned businesses: Akamai Pest Solutions, Aloha Coast Realty, Fleming & Associates, Hula Moon Boutique, K&G Architects, Kona Mountain Coffee, Lipps & Son Construction, ProVision Solar, and Tropical Dreams Ice Cream. Also on the list this year are Hawaii Life Real Estate and Sleep Center Hawaii, which have satellite offices on Hawaii Island.

 

Rep. Clift Tsuji on Waiakea High School Improvement Project

Governor Neil Abercrombie today announced the release of Capital Improvement Project funding for projects throughout the state, including $3 million for Waiakea High School.

Satellite picture of Waiakea High School

Rep. Clift Tsuji issued the following statement in response:

“I want to thank the Governor for releasing these funds for Waiakea High School,” said Rep. Clift Tsuji (District 3 – South Hilo, Panaewa, Puna, Keaau, Kurtistown).  “This project would not have been possible without the leadership of the Waiakea High School administration, the Department of Education, and especially the foresight of former Representative Eric Hamakawa, who started the effort for the campus track.”

The appropriation covers the design and construction of an all-weather track and drainage improvements.  This facility will be shared with Hilo High School.  Rep. Tsuji has included the funding in his funding requests for the district since 2007.

“Due to the challenging economy, funding for public school improvements has been very competitive,” continued Rep. Tsuji.  “This past week, we have all been inspired by the Olympic Games.  I am so pleased for the Waiakea High School students who will soon have a new track and facility for their running and field events.”

Big Island Police Charge 53-Year-Old Man in Connection with Hilo Burglary

Big Island police have charged a 53-year-old Hilo man in connection with a home burglary in Hilo.

At 2 p.m. Friday (August 10), after conferring with prosecutors, Brian Wade Pacheco was charged with one count of first-degree burglary and one count of second-degree theft. His bail was set at $35,000. He is being held at the Hilo police cellblock and is scheduled to make his initial court appearance Monday (August 13).

On June 14, shortly after noon, police responded to a call from a 67-year-old Hilo man who reported that upon returning to his Hilo area home, he discovered someone had broken into the house and removed several items with a total estimated value of $1,200.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section arrested Pacheco at 2 a.m. Friday. Police have recovered a portion of the items allegedly stolen.

Police ask that anyone with information on recent burglary activities contact either Detective John Rodrigues Jr. by phone at 961-2384 or by email at jrodrigues@co.hawaii.hi.us or Detective Royce Serrao at 961-8810 or rpserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Investigating Theft of 23 Michigan Tech Tables

Big Island police are investigating a theft that occurred between July 7 and August 3 in the Keaʻau area.


Michigan Tech University officials reported that someone removed 23 custom aluminum tables from Shipman lands off Highway 130 near the 3-mile marker in Keaʻau.

Police ask that anyone who may have witnessed the incident or who may have information on the identity of the person or persons responsible call Officer Shawn Tingle at 965-2716.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hawaii Sections of the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Project

There are so many rumors going around so many websites about geothermal in Hawaii, I thought I would put this out there for folks to actually look at!

The Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap is a structured representation of the many decisions, documents and regulations involved in the permitting process for geothermal exploration and development.

Below is a list of all sections that have been developed so far for the HAWAII geothermal regulatory roadmap project:

Big Island Police Looking for Japanese Man With Cartoon on Abdomen

Big Island police are asking for the public’s help in locating a 28-year-old Hilo man wanted on an outstanding warrant.

Justin Satoru Okazaki-Shimahara

Justin Satoru Okazaki-Shimahara is described as Japanese, about 5-foot-10, about 330 pounds with brown eyes and short black hair. He has a tattoo of a cartoon character on his left abdomen area.

Okazaki-Shimahara is wanted for a warrant for contempt of court. He is also wanted for questioning in connection with an unrelated investigation.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call Detective Ernest Matsumoto Jr. at 961-2379 or email him at ematsumoto@co.hawaii.hi.us. Callers may also call the Police Department’s non emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Searching for 60-Year-Old Pahoa Man Reported Missing in May

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating a 60-year-old Pāhoa man who was reported missing.

Richard Dayle Ainslie

Richard Dayle Ainslie is described as Caucasian, about 6-feet tall, 160 pounds with blue eyes and neck- length brown hair.

He was last seen on or about May 25 at his home in Pāhoa.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call Detective Ernest Matsumoto Jr. at 961-2379 or email him at ematsumoto@co.hawaii.hi.us. Callers may also call the Police Department’s non emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Public Land Development Corporation To Hold Public Hearings On Proposed New Administrative Rules

The Public Land Development Corporation (PLDC) will hold statewide public hearings, starting Monday August 20, for adoption of new Hawai‘i Administrative Rules (HAR) for the PLDC. Some provisions may affect small business.

Lloyd Haraguchi, Executive Director for the PLDC, stated: “The upcoming public hearings are an opportunity to inform the public about the PLDC’s mission, objectives and priorities. We welcome public participation and encourage individuals to utilize this opportunity.”

The proposed adoption of a new Chapter 13-301, HAR, Practice and Procedure establishes operating procedures for the PLDC. It contains general provisions relating to the office location and hours, board meetings, and delegation of authority to the Executive Director; and sets forth procedures for proceedings before the board, contested case hearings, declaratory rulings, and petitions for amendment, adoption, or repeal of administrative rules.

Proposed adoption of a new Chapter13-302, HAR, Public Land Development Program sets forth a procedure for the PLDC to initiate, by itself or with qualified persons, or enter into cooperative agreements with qualified persons for the development or financing of projects that make optimal use of public land for the economic, environmental, and social benefit of the people of Hawai‘i.

Proposed adoption of a new Chapter 13-303, HAR, Project Facility Program establishes a procedure for undertaking and financing any project facility as part of a project. Project facilities include improvements, roads and streets, utility and service corridors, utility lines, water and irrigation systems, lighting systems, security systems, sanitary sewerage systems, and other community facilities where applicable.

Public hearings will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the following times and locations:

  • HILO: Monday, August 20, at Waiakea High School Cafeteria, 155 West Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720
  • KONA: Tuesday, August 21, at Konawaena High School Cafeteria, 81-1043 Konawaena School Rd., Kealakekua, HI 96750
  • MAUI: Friday, August 24, at Maui Waena Intermediate School Cafeteria, 795 Onehe‘e St., Kahului, HI 96732
  • MOLOKA‘I: Monday, August 27, at Mitchell Pau‘ole Community Center, 90 Ainoa St., Kaunakakai, HI 96748
  • O‘AHU: Wednesday, August 29, at Dept. of Land and Natural Resources, Kalanimoku Building, Land Board Conference Room132, 1151 Punchbowl St., Honolulu, HI 96813
  • KAUA‘I: Friday, August 31, at Elsie H. Wilcox Elementary School, 4319 Hardy St., Lihu‘e, HI 96766.

All interested persons are urged to attend the public hearing to present relevant information and individual opinion for PLDC to consider. Persons unable to attend or wishing to present additional comments may email comments to randal.y.ikeda@hawaii.gov or postmark written testimony by Friday, September 14, 2012 to: PLDC, PO Box 2359, Honolulu, HI 96804.

More information on the PLDC is available at http://www.hawaii.gov/dlnr/pldc Copies of the proposed rules change are available on-line at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/pldc/rules.

Copies for public review are available Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at No. 1 Capitol District, 250 S. Hotel St., Room 501, Honolulu, HI 96813. The public may make written request for a mailed copy by indicating mailing address in correspondence sent to the PLDC address in the preceding paragraph.

Any person requiring a special accommodation (i.e. large print materials, sign language interpreters) should make a request in writing to the PLDC address in the preceding paragraph or by calling 587-0393 (V/T). The request will need to be received at least seven days before the hearing date.

ABOUT PLDC: The Public Land Development Corporation is a state entity created by the Legislature in 2011 to develop state lands and generate revenues for the Department of Land and Natural Resources. Through public-private partnerships, the corporation aims to attract private companies as joint partners in development opportunities.

The corporation was formed after the Legislature passed Senate Bill 1555 which was signed into law as Act 55 by Governor Neil Abercrombie. The corporation is governed by a five-member board of directors. Executive director is Lloyd Haraguchi. Three state agencies are represented on the board either by its director or their designee. The agencies include the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism; the Department of Budget and Finance; and the Department of Land and Natural Resources. One member is appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives, and one member is appointed by the Senate president.

40th Annual Ho`oku`ikahi Hawaiian Cultural Festival

The 40th Annual Ho`oku`ikahi Hawaiian Cultural Festival is taking place this week and is free and open to the public:

Big Island Police Participating in “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” Campaign

Big Island police will increase enforcement of drunk driving as part of a national campaign called “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over,” which runs August 19 through September 5.

To help bring awareness to the upcoming campaign, the Police Department’s Traffic Services Section plans a sign-waving event on Kamehameha Avenue in Hilo from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday (August 14). Volunteers are encouraged to participate.

Impaired driving presents a potential danger to every motorist, passenger and pedestrian the driver encounters. Already this year, Big Island police have made more than 800 DUI arrests, and 12 of the 24 traffic fatalities this year involved drugs, alcohol or both.

Police remind the public that the County of Hawaiʻi Mass Transit Agency maintains a Shared-Ride Taxi program year round. Every individual is entitled to buy subsidized taxi coupons for as low as $2 each and use them with participating taxi companies. For details, call 961-8744 or visit www.heleonbus.org/shared-ride-taxi-program.

Harvesting and Processing Fresh Awa

Last week, my father-in-law Jerry Konanui and some of his friends, got together to harvest and process two Awa plants.  They started early in the morning out at Jerry’s friend Ed’s farm where Ed talked to them a bit about the plant and culture of growing it over six years.

Some plants in his yard

They then dug up the plants by being very careful not to cut into the roots of the plants.

After digging up the plants they hosed excess dirt and soil from the plant before taking it back to where it would be processed.

“Preliminary wash so we can see what needs to be done.” said Adil “Pono” Ghiasi

Once the root was transported back home…  dad busted out the power washer for the initial cleaning of the dirt off the surface of the roots and corm.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/GbdfSE-vk5A]

Once the roots and corm get power washed, they are then meticulously hand cleaned.

Even my son got into it!

After it’s cleaned outside of the house, the roots are moved inside the house where they are then cleaned even more thoroughly.

After it has been thoroughly cleaned, it then gets chopped up into smaller pieces for the final quality control inspection as well as prepping for the high capacity grinder.

Primo and Dad have bionic arms!

The Awa is then put into large bags and then put into large freezers so that the root can freeze for a few days before grinding it.

Getting ready to put the Awa in the freezer

After freezing in the freezer for a few days, the awa is ready to be ground in high capacity grinder.

After it has been ground to a very smooth consistent texture the awa is removed from the grinder and ready for packaging.

It’s then weighed into one pound packages and flattened and sealed to get out any remaining air that may be in the package.

The frozen Awa remains very cold throughout the grinding, bagging and refreeze process… this is to prevent fermentation (souring).

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It’s very important to have space between the racks of Awa so that the freezer air can get an even circulation and that the packages all freeze at the same time.

Some folks often ask why the price of fresh frozen ground Awa is so high/expensive… well I can tell you that it’s due to the  hard work and lots of loving care that goes into it.

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The coconut shells used for drinking awa are called “apu” and the bowl is called a “tanoa”

Dad used to sell his Awa all over the State of Hawaii and at the time on the mainland too, but has now cut back to just helping to educate others on being able to provide for themselves and to have a little stock on hand for himself, his friends and family.

If you are interested in purchasing Awa, I recommend Adil “Pono” Ghiasi’s company “Paradise Kava” if you are interested in picking some up online.

“Last cups are poured and the tanoa is drained. And that is how kava is harvested, processed and enjoyed” says Adil Ghiasi

Dad would like to thank all those that have helped him with this Awa harvest and would like to especially thank Ed J. for providing the plants and the opportunity.