Big Island Police Renewing Request for Information on Man Found Dead in Lower Puna

Big Island police are renewing their request for information about the location of a car belonging to a man found dead in lower Puna on January 17.

The body of 62-year-old Dennis Eugene White of Kapoho was found partially submerged near the shoreline in the vicinity of Isaac Hale Beach Park in Pohoiki. A autopsy determined that he died from a head injury.

Although police have not ruled out foul play, the case is currently classified as a coroner’s inquest. Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation.

White's Jeep

White’s car was a black or dark green 1998 Jeep Wrangler with a tan soft top with license plate HDY 926. White was last seen driving the Jeep alone in the area of Papaya Farms Road in Kapoho in the early evening hours of January 16.

Police ask that anyone with information about this case or the location of the Jeep call Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or email him at nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Looking for Man Caught on Surveilance Using Stolen Credit Card

Big Island police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man suspected of using a stolen credit card.

Wanted

A 33-year-old man reported that his wallet containing his credit cards was stolen from the Hilo area sometime between 9 p.m. September 23 and the early morning hours of September 24.

Police later recovered a video surveillance image of a man who used the credit card at various businesses in Kona on September 24.

He is described as Caucasian, possibly in his 30s, bald, approximately 6-feet tall with numerous piercings on his face. He was wearing dark shorts, no shirt and a white necklace during the transactions.

Police ask that anyone who may know his identity call Officer Donovan Kohara at the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Harvest of First Farmed Fish in U.S. Waters Off the Big Island Shows Promise of Eco-Friendly Aquaculture

Marine biologists at Kampachi Farms announced today the successful final harvest from the “Velella” Research Project, which raised fish for the first time in U.S. Federal waters. This harvest completes the grow-out cycle of sashimi-grade kampachi fish from an unanchored drifter pen that has been riding eddies in the open ocean, 3 to 75 miles offshore of the Big Island of Hawaii, since last summer.

“This final harvest far surpassed our expectations,” said Neil Anthony Sims, Co-CEO of Kampachi Farms. “The fish thrived in the research net pen far from shore, with phenomenal growth rates and superb fish health… and without any negative impact on water quality, the ocean floor, wild fish or marine mammals.”

The research project raised kampachi (a tropical yellowtail) in a single unanchored, submersible net pen tethered to a manned sailing vessel, in water up to 12,000 feet deep.

“This array proved to be very robust,” said Steve Page, President of Ocean Farm Technologies, makers of the Aquapod® pen. “It withstood even extreme conditions 75 miles offshore, with winds gusting over 40 knots and swells over 20 feet.”

The kampachi were fed a sustainable commercial diet that replaced a significant amount of fishmeal and fish oil with soy and other alternative agricultural proteins. No antibiotics, hormones or pesticides were used throughout the seven-month trial.

Sims reported that the kampachi reached an average of 5.6 lbs in six months, resulting in a first harvest a full three months ahead of schedule. The final food conversion ratio (FCR) was 1.6:1 (1.6 pounds of feed to produce 1 pound of fish). In comparison, average FCR for chicken is 1.9:1, and beef is up to 6.5:1.

Sims said that fish health was superb throughout the trial, with an overall mortality rate of less than 2%, compared with a standard aquaculture mortality rate of 15%. Sample testing showed that the kampachi had a fat content of 33%, making this an extraordinarily healthful fish for human consumption, high in heart-healthy Omega-3s with no discernible mercury or other contaminants.

“It makes perfect sense to raise fish in the ocean, where they belong,” said Sims. “This was a healthy, low-stress environment for the fish, and we think that this allowed them to channel their energy into growing faster.”

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These were the first farmed fish raised in U.S. federal waters and required a special research permit from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Sims indicated that this project represented a significant step forward in developing the open ocean aquaculture industry in the U.S.

The project garnered support from a wide variety of stakeholders from science, technology, and sustainable agriculture, including NOAA, the National Science Foundation, Lockheed-Martin, the International Copper Association, Ocean Farm Technologies, and the Illinois Soybean Association, which provided some funding from the Illinois soybean checkoff program.

“The success of the Velella research demonstrates that we can grow fish in the open ocean with no negative impact on pristine ocean ecosystems,” said Sims. “We must now apply ourselves to responsibly scale up this industry, to meet the growing global demand for high-quality seafood.”

The next phase of this research will test a single-point mooring 6 miles offshore in water 6,000 feet deep, where the pen can move freely in currents and still be within easy range of shore for supply delivery and crew rotation.

Big Island Police Searching for Man Wanted for Questioning in Connection With a Sexual Assault of Minor

Big Island police are requesting the public’s help in locating a 58-year-old Puna man wanted for an outstanding bench warrant and for questioning in connection with a recently reported sexual assault of a minor.

Sage Million

Detectives are seeking Sage Million, last known to have been living in the Ainaloa subdivision in Puna. He is described as Caucasian, 5-foot-7, 140 pounds with short brown hair balding at the front, brown eyes, a medium build and a light complexion.

Detectives with the Juvenile Aid Section are continuing this investigation.

Police ask that anyone with information on Million’s location call Detective Daylan Asuncion at 961-8843 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Pictures Released From My Zipine Trip With KapohoKine Three Months BEFORE the Death at Honoli’i Mountain Outpost

Investigators have now stated that the  platform that collapsed on the September 21st zip line accident that happened at KapohoKine’s Honoli’i Outpost killing a Maui resident who had been working on the lines, had previously collapsed two months previously before the incident.

One of the workers rides over line four back in June

The Hawaii Tribune stated:

A pair of stabilizing anchors failed to keep a zip line platform from collapsing, killing one worker and critically injuring another on Sept. 21, according to a police report.

Additionally, contractors working on the project told police that the same zip line — Line No. 8 at the Honolii Mountain Outpost course recently built for Hilo-based eco-tourism company KapohoKine Adventures — had experienced a similar collapse prior to the accident that claimed the life of 36-year-old worker Ted Callaway…

The Maui News reported that the platform previously collapsed TWO months before the accident:

A police report says the Big Island zipline tower that collapsed and sent a worker plunging to his death had experienced a similar collapse eight weeks prior...

I had previously been up to Honoli’i Mountain outpost about THREE months before the accident when I rode the first four lines.  The other lines were still being constructed.

So basically what this tells me… is that the platform collapsed the first time about a month after it was built and ready to be ridden as I was there three months before the accident and they weren’t completed yet.

I only published a few of the pictures I took three months ago on my site previously.  Now that more information is coming out… I figured I would publish the rest of the pictures from my June 16th zip line trip with KapohoKine at the Honoli’i Outpost.

Wordless Wednesday – A Weird Worm or a Hawaiian Blind Snake?

I just saw this weird looking worm crawling around.  I wonder if this is actually one of those Hawaiian blind snakes?

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