Governor Neil Abercrombie Arrives in Japan

Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood led the October 12, 2011 Worldwide Uchinanchu Festival Eve Parade in Naha, Okinawa, Japan.
Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood

Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood

The festival is the largest gathering of Okinawans in the world and many return to their home prefecture to celebrate the event with family, friends and relatives.
Governor Abercrombie meets folks in Japan

Governor Abercrombie meets folks in Japan

Hawai‘i is home to one of the largest expatriate Okinawan populations in the United States of America, thousands of whom emigrated to the islands generations ago to provide labor in sugar and pineapple plantations in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Many in Hawai‘i’s Okinawan community have retained strong cultural and business ties to the land of their ancestors.

Governor Abercrombie arrives in Japan

Governor Abercrombie arrives in Japan

Abercrombie is on the early leg of a trip through Asia to strengthen business ties, promote Hawai‘i economic opportunities, boost tourism and lay groundwork for the upcoming APEC meeting in November in Honolulu.
Governor Abercrombie arrives in Japan

Governor Abercrombie arrives in Japan

Greenwood spent last week in Vietnam helping to inaugurate the new Executive MBA class at the Shidler College of Business in Ho Chi Minh City and to participate in pre-APEC workshop panels for Vietnamese business and government officials in Hanoi and in Ho Chi Minh City.
Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood

Gov. Neil Abercrombie and University of Hawai‘i President M.R.C. Greenwood

She will receive an honorary degree from UH’s sister university, Ryukus University in Ryudai, on October 13, and along with the governor will plant an Okinawan Cherry Blossom tree at the university, close to trees planted by previous UH presidents.

Ultimate Barista Challenge Coming to the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival

For the first time, the 41st Annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival, November 4 – 14, 2011, will feature the international event Ultimate Barista Challenge® Hawaii and a Kona Barista Jam. As attendees from all over the world participate in the Festival, Island Baristi will come together for a rousing two days of barista hands on training sessions designed to increase coffee skills, share passion and increase local consumption followed by the celebrated UBC Hawaii barista competition. Both events occur at the Keauhou Beach Resort on November 9th and 10th, 1 – 6 pm.

The Kona Barista Jam 2011

The Ultimate Barista Challenge (UBC) ® Hawaii will feature two tasty bouts of espresso challenges, the popular Latte Art Challenge where baristi prepare intricate designs with espresso and steamed milk. Drinks will be judged on Visual Design and Taste. The Espresso Frappe Challenge features iced blended drinks of the baristi own creation, where balance of espresso and ingredients is important. Baristi, who win the qualifying round, face international barista champion Ultimate Barista Heather Perry in a one-on-one dueling Final Challenge of fast-paced espresso excellence. Top scoring barista becomes the Ultimate Barista! UBC certified judges are chefs within the community, coffee tasting specialists, and food writers.  Top scoring local barista will win a trip to attend the annual Specialty Coffee Association of America conference in Portland, Oregon April 2012.

WholeCup Coffee Consulting

 

Dr. Shawn Steiman, coffee scientist and consultant, Coffea Consulting, “The Kona Barista Jam and Ultimate Barista Challenge are about education and friendly competition.  What better way to unite the Hawaii coffee industry and get people excited about coffee quality?”

Participation in the Jam and UBC are $50 with all proceeds going to the Festival.

Pilot Opens Cockpit Door and Proposes to Flight Attendant Over the Hawaiian Islands

I’ll file this down under the sweet… but I’m not so sure about this file!

An airplane pilot opens the cockpit door in mid-flight and proposes to a flight attendant on board the plane over the Hawaiian Island of Lanai.

Pilot Proposes to Flight Attendant

A Pilot Proposes to Flight Attendant in Mid-Flight

I just noticed the following video and before folks jump all over any airlines here in Hawaii… I’ll be the first to confirm that it was not a Go Airline pilot that pulled this stunt in mid-air with passengers aboard the plane.

This is what the pilot says about his video:

“Flying over the Hawaiian Islands, just passing the Island of Lanai. This is how and where I proposed to my wife. Good thing she said yes!

[youtube=http://youtu.be/mAwGNoavrrM]

Of course it appears that all of this appears to be a stunt for the website Ring of Finger where couples are encouraged to send in wacky marriage proposals.  Their motto is “Videos of Heartwarming Proposals Sent in by Lovebirds across the world.

Coming Up – 6th Annual Moku O Keawe International Festival Cultural Workshops Celebrate Hula and the Arts

The 6th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival comes to life at Waikoloa Beach Resort, November 3-5, with international hula competition, a Made-in-Hawai‘i Marketplace and more. One of Hawaii’s biggest hula events, Moku O Keawe offers an educational, entertaining and engaging experience for everyone.

Moku O Keawe

International hula competition, Thursday-Saturday, November 3-5, Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens.   Moku O Keawe brings together hālau from Hawai‘i, Japan, and the U.S. Mainland with top caliber hula competition in the areas of Hula Kahiko and Hula ‘Auana.

  • Kahiko competition, Thursday, November 3, 5:30 p.m.
  • Kupuna competition and awards, Friday, November 4, 5:30 p.m.
  • ‘Auana competition and awards, Saturday, November 5, 5:30 p.m.

Affordable for everyone, Moku O Keawe tickets are only $5 Lawn seating, $15 Reserved. (Beach chairs and mats welcomed!)

Hawai‘i Marketplace.  Friday and Saturday November 4 and 5, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa.  The Made-In-Hawaii Marketplace features some of the best products from the Island of Hawaii.  Hula implements, fresh lei, silk-screened clothing, woven lauhala hats and purses and jewelry, are some of the offerings at the special marketplace.

Moku O Keawe

Cultural Workshops, November 3-5.  The competition judges are asked to share their knowledge through workshops.  As masters, their insights and experiences are offered on a personal basis, allowing participants an opportunity to learn about hula kahiko and hula ‘auana, as the various lineages of the kumu hula are unique forms in style, repertoire, and interpretation.  Registration is limited and students are urged to register early by visiting www.MOKIF.org.

2011 Workshops

  • Workshop #1:  “Ko Ma‘i Ho‘eu‘eu” – Hula Ipu Heke Ole/Hula ‘Auana:  Nalani Kanakaole, Competition Judge.  Thursday, November 4, 9 a.m.–12 p.m.  “Ko Ma‘i Ho’eu‘eu” was composed for King Kalākaua.  The mele ma‘i honors the King and one of his popular mottos: “Ho‘ulu Lāhui” or “Increase the Race.”  The use of the ipu in choreography adds percussion by the dancer.  As a hula teacher for over fifty years, she is widely known as a difficult choreographer, affording the student of hula ‘auana with many challenges.  This three-hour class is limited to 50 students, with a donation of $50 for the three-hour hula workshop.
  • Workshop #2:  Hula Workshop: Leialoha Amina, Competition Judge.  Friday, November 4, 9 a.m.–12 p.m.  Limited to 50 participants.  Information will be provided soon.  A donation of $50.00 includes class instruction.
  • Workshop #3:  “Manu ‘O‘o” – Hula ‘Auana:  Iwalani Kalima, Competition Judge.  Saturday, November 5, 9 a.m.–12 p.m.  A favored love song, this hula speaks of Hilo Hanakahi, the kanilehua rain, and the lehua clusters.  Harry Na‘ope, grandfather of George Na‘ope, penned this mele hooipoipo. Iwalani Kalima comes from the very talented Kalima ‘ohana, known for their leo nahenahe.  In addition to “Manu ‘O‘o,” the student will learn “Ka Manu,” as the kai and hoi for the stage performance. A donation of $50 includes instructions for the three-hour hula workshop.
  • Workshop #4:  “Palisa” – Hula ‘Auana Workshop: Nani Lim Yap, Kumu Hula.  Thursday, November 3, 9 a.m.–12 p.m.   Nani, a gifted singer, hula dancer, ‘ukulele player and one of the Kumu Hula of the award-winning Hula Hālau Nā Lei O Kaholoku, is one of the “sweet angelic voices” of the popular musical family – the Lim Family of Kohala. “Palisa,” a song written by Kuana Torres, is a contemporary hula, as the song has just been released this year. The three-hour class is limited to 50 students. A donation of $50 includes instructions for the three-hour hula workshop.
  • Workshop #5:  Wahi Pana: Kalahuipua‘a – Huaka‘i to South Kohala:  Kaniela and Anna Akaka.  Friday, November 4.  Departure: 10 a.m., Return: approximately 2 p.m.  The Kalahuipua‘a Fishponds are the spiritual center of Mauna Lani Resort.  The seven ponds—Kalahuipua‘a, Kahinawao, Waipuhi, Waipuhi Iki, Hope‘ala, Milokukahi and Manoku—were used to raise fish and supplement ocean fishing. Daniel Akaka and his wife Anna, ambassadors of aloha, will direct the excursion of the famed site.  This excursion begins at Waikoloa Beach Marriott with a bus shuttle departure at 10 a.m.  A donation of $45.00 includes tour, historical facts, bus fees and box lunch.
  • Workshop #6:  Pa‘u La‘i – Ti Leaf Skirt: Kika Nohara.  Friday, November 4, 1-4 p.m.  In hula, only the green ti plant is used in making lei, skirts, and in ritual. Kika Nohara, a dancer with Hālau O Kekuhi and is ranked a kumu through ‘uniki rites, will teach the hālau style of making the fresh green skirt. The three-hour hands-on workshop will share techniques and the preparation of the leaves. A kit will be provided to each participant.  A donation of $50 includes instruction and all supplies including all ti leaves.
  • Workshop #7:  Ipu Heke ‘Ole – Hula Gourd Instrument:  Kalim and Kuuleialoha Smith.  Thursday, November 3; 1-4 p.m.  Implements are extensions of the body.  In ‘auana, the ipu heke ‘ole (single gourd), is held in one hand and tapped, swirled, and positioned within the choreography to enhance and illustrate the story lines. Kalim and Kuuleialoha Smith grow the ipu on lands of their forefathers.  Select an ipu and create a percussion instrument that will last a lifetime! Class size is limited due to the number of gourds available.  Only 25 students will have a selection of ipu.  A donation of $75 includes a complete ipu heke kit and classroom instructions.  (A hula workshop with the ipu heke ‘ole will be taught by Nalani Kanakaole the following day.)
  • Workshop #8:  Ipu Heke – Hula Gourd Instrument:  Kalim and Kuuleialoha Smith.  Thursday and Friday, November 3 and 4.  9 a.m.-12 p.m. both days.  The ipu heke is one of the percussion instruments of the hula kahiko.  Kalim and Kuuleialoha Smith grow the ipu on lands of their forefathers.  They have grown and made some of the most perfect instruments in modern times. Class size is limited due to the number of gourds available.  Only 25 students will have a selection of ipu.  A donation of $135 includes a complete ipu heke kit and classroom instructions.

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts. For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com

Wordless Wednesday – My Son is Awarded the Hāweo Award

My son was selected for the Hāweo award for the the month of September and today was his Hāweo Luncheon at Kamehameha Schools.

Student of the Month

Student of the Month

Hāweo ~ Distinguished, honored, placed in  a position of glittering honor

Plane Ditched in Ocean Off the Big Island Was to Be Sold

The rescued pilot of a Cessna 310 twin-engine aircraft ditched in the ocean near Hawaii on Friday was attempting to deliver the plane for an aircraft broker, federal aviation records show.

Cessna 310

A Cessna 310 ditches in the ocean off the Big Island of Hawaii

Officials offered no explanation Monday as to why the aircraft may have run out of fuel.

Charles Brian Mellor, 65, of Spain, was an experienced airman, licensed in the U.S. as an instructor and commercial pilot, according to FAA records.

Monterey Regional Airport Operations Manager Ken Griggs said Mellor purchased 151.8 gallons of fuel at the airport before departing for Hawaii on Friday morning…

More here: Plane ditched near Hawaii was to be sold.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/TJadOjAQq8A]

It’s not often that a video camera is handy at the exact moment a pilot has to ditch, but that was the case when a pilot ferrying a Cessna 310 to Hawaii from California ran out of fuel on Friday. Charles Mellor, 65, told controllers he was running low on fuel when he was about 500 miles from Hilo, about 11 hours after his departure from Monterey. The Coast Guard sent an HC-130 Hercules from Air Station Barbers Point in Honolulu to escort the airplane. Coast Guard pilots maintained communications with Mellor for more than an hour until his engines quit, about 13 miles from land. After splashing down, Mellor climbed from the cockpit onto the wing. A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew assisted in the rescue, sending a rescue swimmer to fetch Mellor and help hoist him into the helicopter. Mellor was taken to a hospital in Hilo and later released. He suffered no significant injuries, the Coast Guard said.